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2k games says everyone in family should buy Bioshock.

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Posts

  • urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    If you are making a PC game, especially a single player one, you have to do anything in your power to stop easy piracy, otherwise your game just won't fucking sell. One of my old roomates was a primary pc gamer and the last fucking game he bought was Quake. Ridiculous.

    I'm in the same boat. My roommate just recently bought Bioshock because he couldn't pirate it, and before that it was Might and Magic: Dark Messiah... Before that... I'm not quite sure. He usually pirates every game, and if he can't pirate it, he doesn't even play the game.

    The thing is, he makes twice as much as I do at his job. So there's no reason for him to do this, except to be called a pirate.

    Saturday Oct 4th @ 3pm EST I will be hosting a Game Night with a bunch of friends. We plan to stream everything to the following twitch account, so please join us!
    Twitch.tv account: GameNightGoesll
    Direct Link
  • stranger678stranger678 Registered User
    edited September 2007
    urahonky wrote: »
    If you are making a PC game, especially a single player one, you have to do anything in your power to stop easy piracy, otherwise your game just won't fucking sell. One of my old roomates was a primary pc gamer and the last fucking game he bought was Quake. Ridiculous.

    I'm in the same boat. My roommate just recently bought Bioshock because he couldn't pirate it, and before that it was Might and Magic: Dark Messiah... Before that... I'm not quite sure. He usually pirates every game, and if he can't pirate it, he doesn't even play the game.

    The thing is, he makes twice as much as I do at his job. So there's no reason for him to do this, except to be called a pirate.

    So your saying that since it had obscene copy protection, he couldn't pirate it, so he bought it. Resulting in a sale for 2K games.....what a wild concept.

    PASig.jpg
  • Xenogears of BoreXenogears of Bore Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    LewieP wrote: »
    Daedalus wrote: »
    If you are making a PC game, especially a single player one, you have to do anything in your power to stop easy piracy, otherwise your game just won't fucking sell. One of my old roomates was a primary pc gamer and the last fucking game he bought was Quake. Ridiculous.

    But if none of the protections actually stop piracy, and in fact annoy the shit out of paying customers (and don't bother pirates at all, since they don't need to deal with them), then does it actually help? Again, GalCiv2 had no copy protection and sold gangbusters, while contemporary games with the obnoxious fucking Starforce3 protection sold in the shitter (and were just as easily pirated).

    Every sale counts when it comes to PC gaming. Unless its the Sims/WoW. Just think how many people must pirate the Sims, it boggles the mind.

    but 'The Sims' has copy protection, how could anyone possibly pirate it?

    I realize this. I used the Sims because besides MMO's (which are almost un piratable unless you like playing them ten years later/on a shitty private server) its a game that has actually done really well.

    In fact, I'm almost positive that companies getting sick and tired of piracy is what will finally drive online distribution foward. It's quite a bit tougher to pirate your average online distributed game, and you can force checks for online connectivity. I know that right now you can shut that off in Steam, but I guarantee that in the future they may make an internet connection a requirement for all games.

    3DS CODE: 3093-7068-3576
  • subediisubedii Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    urahonky wrote: »
    No one should be uninstalling this game right now anyway. In 2 - 3 years time if they don't have that application out to give you back your activation... Then I can see everyone's gripe.

    But for now: Keep the game installed anyway. Play through it again, and again... and again.

    It's a big game, I need the space on my relatively small HDD. I've already completed it and uninstalled it now because I have no intention of doing a second runthrough immediately after my first.

    I'm sorry, but NO. If this is the way they're going to play it, if this eats one of my installs for no good reason, then that application shouldn't even be coming out tomorrow, it should have been included WITH the game on release. I don't care about 2-3 years time, there are plenty of people who'll burn through those installs in a very short space of time through any number of factors.

    Realsitically, I doubt that there's going to be an issue, but the idea that I should refrain from uninstalling it because "No one should be uninstalling this game right now" is ridiculous.

  • urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    urahonky wrote: »
    If you are making a PC game, especially a single player one, you have to do anything in your power to stop easy piracy, otherwise your game just won't fucking sell. One of my old roomates was a primary pc gamer and the last fucking game he bought was Quake. Ridiculous.

    I'm in the same boat. My roommate just recently bought Bioshock because he couldn't pirate it, and before that it was Might and Magic: Dark Messiah... Before that... I'm not quite sure. He usually pirates every game, and if he can't pirate it, he doesn't even play the game.

    The thing is, he makes twice as much as I do at his job. So there's no reason for him to do this, except to be called a pirate.

    So your saying that since it had obscene copy protection, he couldn't pirate it, so he bought it. Resulting in a sale for 2K games.....what a wild concept.

    Well, he didn't buy it first. He logged into my Steam account from his computer and tried to get it to run on his computer. But everytime I logged into Steam it kicked him out of Bioshock.

    So I reset my password and basically forced him to buy the damn game.

    Normally if he can't get a good copy of a game online, he just won't buy the game unless people tell him it's worth the money.

    Saturday Oct 4th @ 3pm EST I will be hosting a Game Night with a bunch of friends. We plan to stream everything to the following twitch account, so please join us!
    Twitch.tv account: GameNightGoesll
    Direct Link
  • Phoenix-DPhoenix-D Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    Daedalus wrote: »
    If you are making a PC game, especially a single player one, you have to do anything in your power to stop easy piracy, otherwise your game just won't fucking sell. One of my old roomates was a primary pc gamer and the last fucking game he bought was Quake. Ridiculous.

    But if none of the protections actually stop piracy, and in fact annoy the shit out of paying customers (and don't bother pirates at all, since they don't need to deal with them), then does it actually help? Again, GalCiv2 had no copy protection and sold gangbusters, while contemporary games with the obnoxious fucking Starforce3 protection sold in the shitter (and were just as easily pirated).

    Every sale counts when it comes to PC gaming. Unless its the Sims/WoW. Just think how many people must pirate the Sims, it boggles the mind.

    If the profit per sale times the number of sales lost to piracy is LESS than the cost of copy protection, then you've wasted money. End of story.

    And the quicker the protection is cracked, the less money its worth.

  • MumblyfishMumblyfish Registered User
    edited September 2007
    urahonky wrote: »
    My roommate just recently bought Bioshock because he couldn't pirate it[...]
    Then he did not look very hard. A cursory Google search reveals that Bioshock's copy protection did little more than stall the pirating community, and "Better than Original" DVD images are readily available to anyone with a working Internet connection.

    The copy protection on Bioshock did not work.

  • urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    subedii wrote: »
    urahonky wrote: »
    No one should be uninstalling this game right now anyway. In 2 - 3 years time if they don't have that application out to give you back your activation... Then I can see everyone's gripe.

    But for now: Keep the game installed anyway. Play through it again, and again... and again.

    It's a big game, I need the space on my relatively small HDD. I've already completed it and uninstalled it now because I have no intention of doing a second runthrough immediately after my first.

    I'm sorry, but NO. If this is the way they're going to play it, if this eats one of my installs for no good reason, then that application shouldn't even be coming out tomorrow, it should have been included WITH the game on release. I don't care about 2-3 years time, there are plenty of people who'll burn through those installs in a very short space of time through any number of factors.

    Realsitically, I doubt that there's going to be an issue, but the idea that I should refrain from uninstalling it because "No one should be uninstalling this game right now" is ridiculous.

    I was joking sir, relax. :)

    Saturday Oct 4th @ 3pm EST I will be hosting a Game Night with a bunch of friends. We plan to stream everything to the following twitch account, so please join us!
    Twitch.tv account: GameNightGoesll
    Direct Link
  • DarkWarriorDarkWarrior __BANNED USERS
    edited September 2007
    Mumblyfish wrote: »
    urahonky wrote: »
    My roommate just recently bought Bioshock because he couldn't pirate it[...]
    Then he did not look very hard. A cursory Google search reveals that Bioshock's copy protection did little more than stall the pirating community, and "Better than Original" DVD images are readily available to anyone with a working Internet connection.

    The copy protection on Bioshock did not work.

    Copy protection never works, on any console. It only delays the inevitable. Seriously, I don't understand why companies waste their money paying jerkoffs like Securom for fallible security. At least they seem to have kicked Starforce to the kerb.

    ...it's in the shape of a giant c**k.
  • Xenogears of BoreXenogears of Bore Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    Phoenix-D wrote: »
    Daedalus wrote: »
    If you are making a PC game, especially a single player one, you have to do anything in your power to stop easy piracy, otherwise your game just won't fucking sell. One of my old roomates was a primary pc gamer and the last fucking game he bought was Quake. Ridiculous.

    But if none of the protections actually stop piracy, and in fact annoy the shit out of paying customers (and don't bother pirates at all, since they don't need to deal with them), then does it actually help? Again, GalCiv2 had no copy protection and sold gangbusters, while contemporary games with the obnoxious fucking Starforce3 protection sold in the shitter (and were just as easily pirated).

    Every sale counts when it comes to PC gaming. Unless its the Sims/WoW. Just think how many people must pirate the Sims, it boggles the mind.

    If the profit per sale times the number of sales lost to piracy is LESS than the cost of copy protection, then you've wasted money. End of story.

    And the quicker the protection is cracked, the less money its worth.

    That's another interesting thing about this discussion; no one has anywhere near accurate numbers on piracy, for obvious reasons. There could be 100 million pirated copies of The Sims out there, or maybe 20 million. Who the fuck knows? All I do know is that companies have to try something in the PC world. Piracy is a big reason why a lot of development time and dollars have moved over to consoles, besides standarized hardware and lower costs.

    A lot of the bigger software pirates I know identify themselves as hardcore PC gamers. Spending thousands of dollars a year to keep their rigs up. Yet they don't realize that they are killing the market for such games with their behavior.

    3DS CODE: 3093-7068-3576
  • urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    Which is why people should worry about the future of PC gaming. It's getting easier and easier to download a pirated copy of a PC game (not to mention console games), and the companies are losing money to it.

    Pretty soon (hopefully not, but I like to remain pessimistic) they will eventually work on Console games, and port them (shitty ports, no doubt) to the PC down the road.

    Saturday Oct 4th @ 3pm EST I will be hosting a Game Night with a bunch of friends. We plan to stream everything to the following twitch account, so please join us!
    Twitch.tv account: GameNightGoesll
    Direct Link
  • subediisubedii Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    urahonky wrote: »
    subedii wrote: »
    urahonky wrote: »
    No one should be uninstalling this game right now anyway. In 2 - 3 years time if they don't have that application out to give you back your activation... Then I can see everyone's gripe.

    But for now: Keep the game installed anyway. Play through it again, and again... and again.

    It's a big game, I need the space on my relatively small HDD. I've already completed it and uninstalled it now because I have no intention of doing a second runthrough immediately after my first.

    I'm sorry, but NO. If this is the way they're going to play it, if this eats one of my installs for no good reason, then that application shouldn't even be coming out tomorrow, it should have been included WITH the game on release. I don't care about 2-3 years time, there are plenty of people who'll burn through those installs in a very short space of time through any number of factors.

    Realsitically, I doubt that there's going to be an issue, but the idea that I should refrain from uninstalling it because "No one should be uninstalling this game right now" is ridiculous.

    I was joking sir, relax. :)

    *Removes batteries from sarcasm detector and places them in the Duracell bunny. Nothing happens*

    Crap.

  • DarkWarriorDarkWarrior __BANNED USERS
    edited September 2007
    Consoles don't mean no piracy though. I think it was clever of MS to create an almost essential online service because it does help quash piracy since they can do checks on a system to detect certain work arounds and I imagine Sony can do the same if they when they manage to crack it. But I did say WHEN. If you don't care about online then cracking isn't much of a problem. I think the Wii is meant to be easy as pie to crack but its still making money. Crap games will get copied but I fail to see how piracy can be associated with losing money.

    If they're willing to wait sometimes 2 weeks for a copy work around, they were unlikely to ever buy a hard copy. Same with movies. Sales lost is a made up number.

    Luckily for PC gaming, since its apparently easy to port between 360 and PC, there will still be games appearing on it.

    ...it's in the shape of a giant c**k.
  • urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    subedii wrote: »
    urahonky wrote: »
    subedii wrote: »
    urahonky wrote: »
    No one should be uninstalling this game right now anyway. In 2 - 3 years time if they don't have that application out to give you back your activation... Then I can see everyone's gripe.

    But for now: Keep the game installed anyway. Play through it again, and again... and again.

    It's a big game, I need the space on my relatively small HDD. I've already completed it and uninstalled it now because I have no intention of doing a second runthrough immediately after my first.

    I'm sorry, but NO. If this is the way they're going to play it, if this eats one of my installs for no good reason, then that application shouldn't even be coming out tomorrow, it should have been included WITH the game on release. I don't care about 2-3 years time, there are plenty of people who'll burn through those installs in a very short space of time through any number of factors.

    Realsitically, I doubt that there's going to be an issue, but the idea that I should refrain from uninstalling it because "No one should be uninstalling this game right now" is ridiculous.

    I was joking sir, relax. :)

    *Removes batteries from sarcasm detector and places them in the Duracell bunny. Nothing happens*

    Crap.

    It happens, sorry :P I didn't add my tags in my post.

    Saturday Oct 4th @ 3pm EST I will be hosting a Game Night with a bunch of friends. We plan to stream everything to the following twitch account, so please join us!
    Twitch.tv account: GameNightGoesll
    Direct Link
  • urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    Consoles don't mean no piracy though. I think it was clever of MS to create an almost essential online service because it does help quash piracy since they can do checks on a system to detect certain work arounds and I imagine Sony can do the same if they when they manage to crack it. But I did say WHEN. If you don't care about online then cracking isn't much of a problem. I think the Wii is meant to be easy as pie to crack but its still making money. Crap games will get copied but I fail to see how piracy can be associated with losing money.

    If they're willing to wait sometimes 2 weeks for a copy work around, they were unlikely to ever buy a hard copy. Same with movies. Sales lost is a made up number.

    Luckily for PC gaming, since its apparently easy to port between 360 and PC, there will still be games appearing on it.

    I hope you're right sir. I'm tired of my PC being used for only MMO games, and Blizzard games. (I do have Bioshock as noted before, but its been a long time since a good game has come out for it)

    Saturday Oct 4th @ 3pm EST I will be hosting a Game Night with a bunch of friends. We plan to stream everything to the following twitch account, so please join us!
    Twitch.tv account: GameNightGoesll
    Direct Link
  • Xenogears of BoreXenogears of Bore Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    Consoles don't mean no piracy though. I think it was clever of MS to create an almost essential online service because it does help quash piracy since they can do checks on a system to detect certain work arounds and I imagine Sony can do the same if they when they manage to crack it. But I did say WHEN. If you don't care about online then cracking isn't much of a problem. I think the Wii is meant to be easy as pie to crack but its still making money. Crap games will get copied but I fail to see how piracy can be associated with losing money.

    If they're willing to wait sometimes 2 weeks for a copy work around, they were unlikely to ever buy a hard copy. Same with movies. Sales lost is a made up number.

    Luckily for PC gaming, since its apparently easy to port between 360 and PC, there will still be games appearing on it.

    The Wii has also been cracking down on modchips via online distributed firmware updates.

    Piracy must cost them some money. It's impossible to calculate how much exactly, of course. A lot of people who couldn't get it for free might not ever get it, but some might.

    3DS CODE: 3093-7068-3576
  • DarkWarriorDarkWarrior __BANNED USERS
    edited September 2007
    urahonky wrote: »
    Consoles don't mean no piracy though. I think it was clever of MS to create an almost essential online service because it does help quash piracy since they can do checks on a system to detect certain work arounds and I imagine Sony can do the same if they when they manage to crack it. But I did say WHEN. If you don't care about online then cracking isn't much of a problem. I think the Wii is meant to be easy as pie to crack but its still making money. Crap games will get copied but I fail to see how piracy can be associated with losing money.

    If they're willing to wait sometimes 2 weeks for a copy work around, they were unlikely to ever buy a hard copy. Same with movies. Sales lost is a made up number.

    Luckily for PC gaming, since its apparently easy to port between 360 and PC, there will still be games appearing on it.

    I hope you're right sir. I'm tired of my PC being used for only MMO games, and Blizzard games. (I do have Bioshock as noted before, but its been a long time since a good game has come out for it)

    I'm the opposite. I've got a PS3 and am waiting for games to come on that. I just hope Fable 2 goes PC because some games should just not be played on a console.

    ...it's in the shape of a giant c**k.
  • DiannaoChongDiannaoChong Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    if you cant get your credits back, then it dosent matter if you install it in 5 different places, or the same machine 5 times, youve lost all your credits. theres currently no way to get your credits back, besides calling for more. A tool is being created at this moment, but noone has an ETA, and noone knows if itill even come out.

    And in 2k's defense, usually its whoever is publishing the games/disc manufacturers contract to have to have some sort of protection. (as far as im aware)

    Edit: and im sick of people saying "dur dont uninstall it"(I did notice you were joking, but people keep saying it) considering for alot of people, more then just me on these boards in fact, the game just did_not_work. It took me 3-4 installs to get the game barely running. And then after those two days of troubleshooting a game I bought im told that if I install it once more and rmeove it, im going to have to call up a security company and explain to them why im not a theif and deserve more installs. On the steam version. the program that does its own verification checks. the software that will only allow me to play the game while logged in. In one location at a time.

    After all my trouble, if I waited 10 days or so, I could of played the game for free, without limited installs, without securom up my ass. Im not buying another 2k game and Ive let them know that. To me all these issues, a buggy as hell release, problems with the extra 3rd party auth servers for the steam version, the whole widescreen fiasco, tell me that they got really fucking lazy, and they still dont care.

    steam_sig.png
  • GrimReaperGrimReaper Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    I'm a pirate.







    I sail the high seas seeking booty.
    Ahem.

    PSN | Steam
    ---
    I've got a spare copy of Portal, if anyone wants it message me.
  • DarkWarriorDarkWarrior __BANNED USERS
    edited September 2007
    Consoles don't mean no piracy though. I think it was clever of MS to create an almost essential online service because it does help quash piracy since they can do checks on a system to detect certain work arounds and I imagine Sony can do the same if they when they manage to crack it. But I did say WHEN. If you don't care about online then cracking isn't much of a problem. I think the Wii is meant to be easy as pie to crack but its still making money. Crap games will get copied but I fail to see how piracy can be associated with losing money.

    If they're willing to wait sometimes 2 weeks for a copy work around, they were unlikely to ever buy a hard copy. Same with movies. Sales lost is a made up number.

    Luckily for PC gaming, since its apparently easy to port between 360 and PC, there will still be games appearing on it.

    The Wii has also been cracking down on modchips via online distributed firmware updates.

    Piracy must cost them some money. It's impossible to calculate how much exactly, of course. A lot of people who couldn't get it for free might not ever get it, but some might.

    My friend has a chipped Wii and I can assure you, the games hes copied, he'd never have bought. But he did buy stuff like Zelda. Pirates basically copy the games they wouldn't buy unless they hit £4.99 or less. And even then...

    I on the other hand only buy games I really want coz I don't have time to play shit I don't want. So GTA's, MGS's and the like I buy launch day. A £400 console isn't worth damaging by cracking it. No way would I risk the warranty on this baby.

    ...it's in the shape of a giant c**k.
  • urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    urahonky wrote: »
    Consoles don't mean no piracy though. I think it was clever of MS to create an almost essential online service because it does help quash piracy since they can do checks on a system to detect certain work arounds and I imagine Sony can do the same if they when they manage to crack it. But I did say WHEN. If you don't care about online then cracking isn't much of a problem. I think the Wii is meant to be easy as pie to crack but its still making money. Crap games will get copied but I fail to see how piracy can be associated with losing money.

    If they're willing to wait sometimes 2 weeks for a copy work around, they were unlikely to ever buy a hard copy. Same with movies. Sales lost is a made up number.

    Luckily for PC gaming, since its apparently easy to port between 360 and PC, there will still be games appearing on it.

    I hope you're right sir. I'm tired of my PC being used for only MMO games, and Blizzard games. (I do have Bioshock as noted before, but its been a long time since a good game has come out for it)

    I'm the opposite. I've got a PS3 and am waiting for games to come on that. I just hope Fable 2 goes PC because some games should just not be played on a console.

    Oh I agree. If I have a choice between the console version and PC version I'll usually pick up the PC version because I prefer KB/M.

    But there have been a number of terrible console ports to PC (Halo 1/2 for example, and RE:4) and I wish they would actually put some effort into it.

    Saturday Oct 4th @ 3pm EST I will be hosting a Game Night with a bunch of friends. We plan to stream everything to the following twitch account, so please join us!
    Twitch.tv account: GameNightGoesll
    Direct Link
  • Xenogears of BoreXenogears of Bore Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    Consoles don't mean no piracy though. I think it was clever of MS to create an almost essential online service because it does help quash piracy since they can do checks on a system to detect certain work arounds and I imagine Sony can do the same if they when they manage to crack it. But I did say WHEN. If you don't care about online then cracking isn't much of a problem. I think the Wii is meant to be easy as pie to crack but its still making money. Crap games will get copied but I fail to see how piracy can be associated with losing money.

    If they're willing to wait sometimes 2 weeks for a copy work around, they were unlikely to ever buy a hard copy. Same with movies. Sales lost is a made up number.

    Luckily for PC gaming, since its apparently easy to port between 360 and PC, there will still be games appearing on it.

    The Wii has also been cracking down on modchips via online distributed firmware updates.

    Piracy must cost them some money. It's impossible to calculate how much exactly, of course. A lot of people who couldn't get it for free might not ever get it, but some might.

    My friend has a chipped Wii and I can assure you, the games hes copied, he'd never have bought. But he did buy stuff like Zelda. Pirates basically copy the games they wouldn't buy unless they hit £4.99 or less. And even then...

    I on the other hand only buy games I really want coz I don't have time to play shit I don't want. So GTA's, MGS's and the like I buy launch day. A £400 console isn't worth damaging by cracking it. No way would I risk the warranty on this baby.

    I hear that. The other nice thing about a console's hardware control is that they can and will (since the days of the NES no less) update hardware and software to kill piracy.

    Later model NES can do it.

    Earthbound has some hilarious anti piracy measures.

    There was a famous stink about FF VIII and anti piracy.

    Some very late model Gamecubes stopped the various "soft-mod" approaches.


    The PSP is the one system availible right now that is losing the fight to piracy. Even then, it seems that the newer slimmed down version might have a few tricks up its sleeve.

    3DS CODE: 3093-7068-3576
  • MumblyfishMumblyfish Registered User
    edited September 2007
    The PSP is the one system availible right now that is losing the fight to piracy.
    Where did you pull this factoid from? It is easy to pirate commercial software for the PSP, but no easier than it is for any other system. In fact, the PSP's rival, the DS, is hands-down the easiest current generation platform to pirate software on. It is perhaps worth noting that despite the almost comical ease of software piracy on the DS, the software sales charts are cluttered with titles for the security-lax dual-screened pirate's haven.

  • SnorkSnork Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    PiptheFair wrote: »
    Phanman wrote: »
    Well think about it like this. What if Paramount Pictures only allowed you to watch your movie on DVD five times, and they counted other people in the room watching it with you as one of your viewings. .

    you mean like a fucking movie theatre?

    you're comparing apples and video games

    Except it is technically illegal to use a purchased DVD to have large viewings. It breaches some fair use clause somewhere and I forget where to look it up so don't ask me for a source.

    I'm pretty sure that's not bullshit.

  • chaossoldierchaossoldier Registered User
    edited September 2007
    Snork wrote: »
    PiptheFair wrote: »
    Phanman wrote: »
    Well think about it like this. What if Paramount Pictures only allowed you to watch your movie on DVD five times, and they counted other people in the room watching it with you as one of your viewings. .

    you mean like a fucking movie theatre?

    you're comparing apples and video games

    Except it is technically illegal to use a purchased DVD to have large viewings. It breaches some fair use clause somewhere and I forget where to look it up so don't ask me for a source.

    I'm pretty sure that's not bullshit.

    It specifies public viewings, as in, viewings that are advertised and open to the general public. There's a fine line between showing a movie to a bunch of friends in the privacy of your own living room and getting a giant crowd of people to come watch a movie without the studio's permission.

    stopit.gifsophia.gifrotj.png
  • SnorkSnork Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    Snork wrote: »
    PiptheFair wrote: »
    Phanman wrote: »
    Well think about it like this. What if Paramount Pictures only allowed you to watch your movie on DVD five times, and they counted other people in the room watching it with you as one of your viewings. .

    you mean like a fucking movie theatre?

    you're comparing apples and video games

    Except it is technically illegal to use a purchased DVD to have large viewings. It breaches some fair use clause somewhere and I forget where to look it up so don't ask me for a source.

    I'm pretty sure that's not bullshit.

    It specifies public viewings, as in, viewings that are advertised and open to the general public. There's a fine line between showing a movie to a bunch of friends in the privacy of your own living room and getting a giant crowd of people to come watch a movie without the studio's permission.
    Well I mean that's what I knew they meant, but I wasn't sure if there was an actual stipulation about the line that you have to cross for it to be illegal.

  • chaossoldierchaossoldier Registered User
    edited September 2007
    Snork wrote: »
    Snork wrote: »
    PiptheFair wrote: »
    Phanman wrote: »
    Well think about it like this. What if Paramount Pictures only allowed you to watch your movie on DVD five times, and they counted other people in the room watching it with you as one of your viewings. .

    you mean like a fucking movie theatre?

    you're comparing apples and video games

    Except it is technically illegal to use a purchased DVD to have large viewings. It breaches some fair use clause somewhere and I forget where to look it up so don't ask me for a source.

    I'm pretty sure that's not bullshit.

    It specifies public viewings, as in, viewings that are advertised and open to the general public. There's a fine line between showing a movie to a bunch of friends in the privacy of your own living room and getting a giant crowd of people to come watch a movie without the studio's permission.
    Well I mean that's what I knew they meant, but I wasn't sure if there was an actual stipulation about the line that you have to cross for it to be illegal.

    THe main stipulation just appears to be the difference in a private showing and a public showing. I mean, you can still show something to a large audience if you're all within a private organization and in a private location. (That's how our club gets away with showing full movies during movie nights).

    stopit.gifsophia.gifrotj.png
  • DaedalusDaedalus Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    Snork wrote: »
    Snork wrote: »
    PiptheFair wrote: »
    Phanman wrote: »
    Well think about it like this. What if Paramount Pictures only allowed you to watch your movie on DVD five times, and they counted other people in the room watching it with you as one of your viewings. .

    you mean like a fucking movie theatre?

    you're comparing apples and video games

    Except it is technically illegal to use a purchased DVD to have large viewings. It breaches some fair use clause somewhere and I forget where to look it up so don't ask me for a source.

    I'm pretty sure that's not bullshit.

    It specifies public viewings, as in, viewings that are advertised and open to the general public. There's a fine line between showing a movie to a bunch of friends in the privacy of your own living room and getting a giant crowd of people to come watch a movie without the studio's permission.
    Well I mean that's what I knew they meant, but I wasn't sure if there was an actual stipulation about the line that you have to cross for it to be illegal.

    THe main stipulation just appears to be the difference in a private showing and a public showing. I mean, you can still show something to a large audience if you're all within a private organization and in a private location. (That's how our club gets away with showing full movies during movie nights).

    The de facto standard right now is that nobody gives a shit unless you're charging admission.

    And Xeno, you're not allowed to say "we don't have any real data on piracy" and then say which systems piracy is damaging the most.

    vvvvvv-dithw.png
  • Xenogears of BoreXenogears of Bore Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    Daedalus wrote: »
    Snork wrote: »
    Snork wrote: »
    PiptheFair wrote: »
    Phanman wrote: »
    Well think about it like this. What if Paramount Pictures only allowed you to watch your movie on DVD five times, and they counted other people in the room watching it with you as one of your viewings. .

    you mean like a fucking movie theatre?

    you're comparing apples and video games

    Except it is technically illegal to use a purchased DVD to have large viewings. It breaches some fair use clause somewhere and I forget where to look it up so don't ask me for a source.

    I'm pretty sure that's not bullshit.

    It specifies public viewings, as in, viewings that are advertised and open to the general public. There's a fine line between showing a movie to a bunch of friends in the privacy of your own living room and getting a giant crowd of people to come watch a movie without the studio's permission.
    Well I mean that's what I knew they meant, but I wasn't sure if there was an actual stipulation about the line that you have to cross for it to be illegal.

    THe main stipulation just appears to be the difference in a private showing and a public showing. I mean, you can still show something to a large audience if you're all within a private organization and in a private location. (That's how our club gets away with showing full movies during movie nights).

    The de facto standard right now is that nobody gives a shit unless you're charging admission.

    And Xeno, you're not allowed to say "we don't have any real data on piracy" and then say which systems piracy is damaging the most.

    I can however mention how easy and cost free the PSP piracy is. Sure, you can mod any system on the market, but it costs money and has a certain level of risk. The PSP? Very, very, very simple to pirate on. No external hardware needed. It's the easiest system since the Dreamcast to play pirated wares on.

    3DS CODE: 3093-7068-3576
  • DaedalusDaedalus Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    Daedalus wrote: »
    Snork wrote: »
    Snork wrote: »
    PiptheFair wrote: »
    Phanman wrote: »
    Well think about it like this. What if Paramount Pictures only allowed you to watch your movie on DVD five times, and they counted other people in the room watching it with you as one of your viewings. .

    you mean like a fucking movie theatre?

    you're comparing apples and video games

    Except it is technically illegal to use a purchased DVD to have large viewings. It breaches some fair use clause somewhere and I forget where to look it up so don't ask me for a source.

    I'm pretty sure that's not bullshit.

    It specifies public viewings, as in, viewings that are advertised and open to the general public. There's a fine line between showing a movie to a bunch of friends in the privacy of your own living room and getting a giant crowd of people to come watch a movie without the studio's permission.
    Well I mean that's what I knew they meant, but I wasn't sure if there was an actual stipulation about the line that you have to cross for it to be illegal.

    THe main stipulation just appears to be the difference in a private showing and a public showing. I mean, you can still show something to a large audience if you're all within a private organization and in a private location. (That's how our club gets away with showing full movies during movie nights).

    The de facto standard right now is that nobody gives a shit unless you're charging admission.

    And Xeno, you're not allowed to say "we don't have any real data on piracy" and then say which systems piracy is damaging the most.

    I can however mention how easy and cost free the PSP piracy is. Sure, you can mod any system on the market, but it costs money and has a certain level of risk. The PSP? Very, very, very simple to pirate on. No external hardware needed. It's the easiest system since the Dreamcast to play pirated wares on.

    Except every firmware update fucks it up, and most games require firmware updates. If I went out and bought a PSP today, I wouldn't be able to pirate anything. Or, more importantly, use homebrew, which is why I own a DS.

    But then, you also mentioned the Dreamcast. Bitter ex-Sega fan? Piracy wasn't what killed the 'cast, it was Sega's constant managerial fuckups both before and after release.

    vvvvvv-dithw.png
  • Xenogears of BoreXenogears of Bore Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    Daedalus wrote: »
    Daedalus wrote: »
    Snork wrote: »
    Snork wrote: »
    PiptheFair wrote: »
    Phanman wrote: »
    Well think about it like this. What if Paramount Pictures only allowed you to watch your movie on DVD five times, and they counted other people in the room watching it with you as one of your viewings. .

    you mean like a fucking movie theatre?

    you're comparing apples and video games

    Except it is technically illegal to use a purchased DVD to have large viewings. It breaches some fair use clause somewhere and I forget where to look it up so don't ask me for a source.

    I'm pretty sure that's not bullshit.

    It specifies public viewings, as in, viewings that are advertised and open to the general public. There's a fine line between showing a movie to a bunch of friends in the privacy of your own living room and getting a giant crowd of people to come watch a movie without the studio's permission.
    Well I mean that's what I knew they meant, but I wasn't sure if there was an actual stipulation about the line that you have to cross for it to be illegal.

    THe main stipulation just appears to be the difference in a private showing and a public showing. I mean, you can still show something to a large audience if you're all within a private organization and in a private location. (That's how our club gets away with showing full movies during movie nights).

    The de facto standard right now is that nobody gives a shit unless you're charging admission.

    And Xeno, you're not allowed to say "we don't have any real data on piracy" and then say which systems piracy is damaging the most.

    I can however mention how easy and cost free the PSP piracy is. Sure, you can mod any system on the market, but it costs money and has a certain level of risk. The PSP? Very, very, very simple to pirate on. No external hardware needed. It's the easiest system since the Dreamcast to play pirated wares on.

    Except every firmware update fucks it up, and most games require firmware updates. If I went out and bought a PSP today, I wouldn't be able to pirate anything. Or, more importantly, use homebrew, which is why I own a DS.

    This is why you downgrade and put a custom firmware on that will run newer games. It's absurdly simple on the PSP. It's not hard on the DS, just a bit more expensive.

    Piracy was bad on the Dreamcast. That did not kill it, nor did EA. A lack of money and the PS2 did.

    3DS CODE: 3093-7068-3576
  • DaedalusDaedalus Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    This is why you downgrade and put a custom firmware on that will run newer games. It's absurdly simple on the PSP. It's not hard on the DS, just a bit more expensive.

    Piracy was bad on the Dreamcast. That did not kill it, nor did EA. A lack of money and the PS2 did.

    Can't downgrade PSP 3.51. You can buy an R4 and it'll work on whatever the hell DS you choose to buy.

    vvvvvv-dithw.png
  • HounHoun Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    Daedalus wrote: »
    This is why you downgrade and put a custom firmware on that will run newer games. It's absurdly simple on the PSP. It's not hard on the DS, just a bit more expensive.

    Piracy was bad on the Dreamcast. That did not kill it, nor did EA. A lack of money and the PS2 did.

    Can't downgrade PSP 3.51. You can buy an R4 and it'll work on whatever the hell DS you choose to buy.

    This is technically incorrect, but I'll not relay any details, as PSP Homebrew Issues are what got me jailed in the first place.

    Anyway, this is getting off on a tangent anyway. I think we can break this argument down into two differing ideologies:

    1. That's the way the world is, they deserve their money, suck it up, it's not as bad as you're making it out to be.

    2. The world is only the way it is because people don't do their part to change it, they deserve their money, but not if they're going to treat me like a criminal and place invasive and disruptive restrictions upon their products.

    As this is largely an ideological issue, I don't expect any rational conclusions to come from it.

    Steam: DigitalArcanist | PSN: DigitalArcanist | NNID: DigitalArcanist | Backloggery: Houn
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