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How to resolve possible IP conflict?

Anonymous RobotAnonymous Robot Registered User
edited September 2007 in Games and Technology
So, as you guys might know, I've been having frequent disconnects since the beginning of May. I am on a wireless network shared by 3 PCs (one desktop connected by ethernet, one desktop by wireless, and one laptop by wireless.)

I have:
Reformatted all computers
Bought a new router
Leased a new modem
Replaced the ethernet and modem cables
Had a Comcast technician come and look
Had Comcast literally dig up my street and put down all new wires

Now I'm realizing that it might be an IP conflict. Whenever I disconnect (or at least, when I can remotely reconnect without having to power cycle the modem and router), it says that my IP is 0.0.0.0 and it only reconnects after the step "reconfiguring IP". What I did was to stop my PCs from using dynamic IPs (I believe the laptop needs to use one, right?)

The (current) IPs for the PCs are:

[IPs removed for security]

Please note that the ethernet PC gets disconnected too, not just the wireless and laptop.

Thank you for any assistance.

Anonymous Robot on
Spoiler:

Posts

  • PatboyXPatboyX Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    Seems strange that only three machines would result in an IP conflict. You could easily test by leaving simply one on for a while and see if it still drops.

    Or do you mean the global IP?

    edit: is that your actual IP posted there? you may not want that posted.

    "lenny bruce is not afraid..."
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  • NailbunnyPDNailbunnyPD Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    Don't post your actual external IP.

    A device connected to your router should be obtaining an external IP. It should be the DHCP assigned IPs which are typically 192.168.1.100, .101, .102, and so on.

    You shouldn't need to manually assign IPs unless you need a static IP on your newtork, such as for port forwarding and server hosting.

    Check your computer's IP using the command ipconfig in a DOS prompt.

    You should only see your external IP in your router, or when using a web-based ip checker, like ipchicken.

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  • Anonymous RobotAnonymous Robot Registered User
    edited September 2007
    Don't post your actual external IP.

    A device connected to your router should be obtaining an external IP. It should be the DHCP assigned IPs which are typically 192.168.1.100, .101, .102, and so on.

    You shouldn't need to manually assign IPs unless you need a static IP on your newtork, such as for port forwarding and server hosting.

    Check your computer's IP using the command ipconfig in a DOS prompt.

    You should only see your external IP in your router, or when using a web-based ip checker, like ipchicken.

    I did use static IPs, as I was unsure if the dynamic was fucking up (and I need to use port forwarding).

    As for checking my IP, the wired one was ipchicken, simply because I forget the command to open the applet that will run /ipconfig.

    Spoiler:
  • NailbunnyPDNailbunnyPD Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    Start->Run...->cmd

    XBL: NailbunnyPD PSN: NailbunnyPD Origin: NailbunnyPD
    NintendoID: Nailbunny 3DS: 3909-8796-4685
    steam_sig-400.png
  • AshendarkAshendark Registered User
    edited September 2007
    The only way to get an IP conflict is when using static IPs or a combination of static and dynamic.

    You should get a little window that pops up and tells you if theres an IP conflict if there is. Atleast you do in Windows XP.

    I would set all three boxes to use DHCP. That should fix the problem if it really is an IP conflict.

    Ashendark.gif
  • NailbunnyPDNailbunnyPD Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    Don't post your actual external IP.

    A device connected to your router should be obtaining an external IP. It should be the DHCP assigned IPs which are typically 192.168.1.100, .101, .102, and so on.

    You shouldn't need to manually assign IPs unless you need a static IP on your newtork, such as for port forwarding and server hosting.

    Check your computer's IP using the command ipconfig in a DOS prompt.

    You should only see your external IP in your router, or when using a web-based ip checker, like ipchicken.

    I did use static IPs, as I was unsure if the dynamic was fucking up (and I need to use port forwarding).

    As for checking my IP, the wired one was ipchicken, simply because I forget the command to open the applet that will run /ipconfig.

    I don't like specifying static IPs on home networks because if the DNS servers change, you will have to manually update it. I much prefer hacked firmware on a Linksys to add the ability to set Static IPs by MAC address in the DHCP settings.

    Also, you don't have to worry about posting internal IPs, like 192.168.x.x or 10.x.x.x. Those are private IPs that will never resolve over the Internet. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_network

    XBL: NailbunnyPD PSN: NailbunnyPD Origin: NailbunnyPD
    NintendoID: Nailbunny 3DS: 3909-8796-4685
    steam_sig-400.png
  • Anonymous RobotAnonymous Robot Registered User
    edited September 2007
    Don't post your actual external IP.

    A device connected to your router should be obtaining an external IP. It should be the DHCP assigned IPs which are typically 192.168.1.100, .101, .102, and so on.

    You shouldn't need to manually assign IPs unless you need a static IP on your newtork, such as for port forwarding and server hosting.

    Check your computer's IP using the command ipconfig in a DOS prompt.

    You should only see your external IP in your router, or when using a web-based ip checker, like ipchicken.

    I did use static IPs, as I was unsure if the dynamic was fucking up (and I need to use port forwarding).

    As for checking my IP, the wired one was ipchicken, simply because I forget the command to open the applet that will run /ipconfig.

    I don't like specifying static IPs on home networks because if the DNS servers change, you will have to manually update it. I much prefer hacked firmware on a Linksys to add the ability to set Static IPs by MAC address in the DHCP settings.

    Also, you don't have to worry about posting internal IPs, like 192.168.x.x or 10.x.x.x. Those are private IPs that will never resolve over the Internet. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_network

    The thing is, I have WRT54GS 7.0, and they downgraded the flash memory, so no 3rd party firmware is compatible anymore.

    Spoiler:
  • SiliconStewSiliconStew Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    First, you need to find out if your external IP address needs to be static or dynamic. Your ISP should have given you an IP address to assign to your machine or to use DHCP/PPPoE/PPTP to access the internet. Either way, your router's external (WAN) interface needs to be configured in the manner they specified.

    Second, since you want to do port forwarding, set up your router to use static IP's on the LAN (private) side. Set the router to use IP address 192.168.1.1/255.255.255.0

    For the Network Address Server Settings on the router, enable DHCP and set the starting address to 192.168.1.11 and max users to 5. For DNS use the same IP's that were given to you by the ISP for the external connection.

    Third, set up each computer to a different static IP address (any from 192.168.1.2 to 192.168.1.10), subnet 255.255.255.0, gateway 192.168.1.1, DNS <same as ISP's external connection>. Or if you want to, set the machine to use DHCP instead (won't be able to port forward to these).

    Test all three machines using a cable to plug into the router. That way you can eliminate any problems from bad wireless settings.

    Also, are you running p2p apps on your machines? I've seen some routers choke due to the large number of connections those make. Check google.

    Just remember that half the people you meet are below average intelligence.
  • SnowconeSnowcone Registered User
    edited September 2007
    With static IPs, it should be easy to ensure no IP conflicts. I always address my router as 192.168.1.1 and start my computers at .1.10 and go from there.

    Do you have a 360 or a Wii on the network too? Remember that they will need IPs as well. Got a DS or a PSP... yup, addresses there too. Network Printers? You get the idea.

    Go grab the Soft Perfect Network Scanner and let it scan your entire subnet/network and see how many devices it sees.

  • Anonymous RobotAnonymous Robot Registered User
    edited September 2007
    Snowcone wrote: »
    With static IPs, it should be easy to ensure no IP conflicts. I always address my router as 192.168.1.1 and start my computers at .1.10 and go from there.

    Do you have a 360 or a Wii on the network too? Remember that they will need IPs as well. Got a DS or a PSP... yup, addresses there too. Network Printers? You get the idea.

    Go grab the Soft Perfect Network Scanner and let it scan your entire subnet/network and see how many devices it sees.

    I have a Wii. Can't use my DS with WPA encryption.

    Spoiler:
  • VelmeranVelmeran Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    Its a wireless network, so when you get disconnected it's normal if your IP gets set back to 0.0.0.0 or the 168.x.x.x default windows gives you. It sounds more like your router is having interferance from something, but then you said teh desktop with ethernet was also getting dropped? Is it a "ethernet cable has become unplugged" message from windows, or a "why the hell isn't it working, it doesn't say I lost connection"?

    First thing I would do, go find a friend and trade routers, see if they have the same problems, and if you have the same problems. You said you got a new router, but was it just the same make/model?

    Also, when one computer disconnects, do they all disconnect? If not, check the router and see if it's losing connection to the modem, I think its more likely the router being crappy, but you never know. Also, Microwaves/Wireless phones are known to cause issues with some wireless signals, might try changing the channel the router runs on.

    Hope these ideas help. Any more info you can give would be great.

    Vechloran.png
  • Anonymous RobotAnonymous Robot Registered User
    edited September 2007
    Velmeran wrote: »
    Its a wireless network, so when you get disconnected it's normal if your IP gets set back to 0.0.0.0 or the 168.x.x.x default windows gives you. It sounds more like your router is having interferance from something, but then you said teh desktop with ethernet was also getting dropped? Is it a "ethernet cable has become unplugged" message from windows, or a "why the hell isn't it working, it doesn't say I lost connection"?

    First thing I would do, go find a friend and trade routers, see if they have the same problems, and if you have the same problems. You said you got a new router, but was it just the same make/model?

    Also, when one computer disconnects, do they all disconnect? If not, check the router and see if it's losing connection to the modem, I think its more likely the router being crappy, but you never know. Also, Microwaves/Wireless phones are known to cause issues with some wireless signals, might try changing the channel the router runs on.

    Hope these ideas help. Any more info you can give would be great.

    I originally had a Microsoft router. When we began having this issue, I went out and bought the Linksys. I did change the channel. Interference may still be a possibility, but it doesn't just go out when a phone rings or something.

    As for the ethernet PC, it only goes out (to my knowledge), when the hardware defuncts and needs to be restarted. That is when all of the computers go out. My father complains of a slow connection, but in all honesty I think he may be imagining it.

    Spoiler:
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