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Fermentation

ShogunShogun Hair long; money long; me and broke wizards we don't get alongRegistered User regular
edited January 2010 in Ancient Forum Knowledge
I have grapes. Regular ol' green grapes. And I have a lot of them. I mean a lot. Like a good wheel barrel full. Here in TN making alcohol isn't illegal when done properly and staying within the legal alcohol limits. I want to make some wine/crude liquor. Wine doesn't really interest me, but crude alcohol will suffice. Any suggestions?

Shogun on
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  • archonwarparchonwarp Registered User regular
    edited July 2005
    Shogun wrote:
    I have grapes. Regular ol' green grapes. And I have a lot of them. I mean a lot. Like a good wheel barrel full. Here in TN making alcohol isn't illegal when done properly and staying within the legal alcohol limits. I want to make some wine/crude liquor. Wine doesn't really interest me, but crude alcohol will suffice. Any suggestions?

    Absolutely, let me MSpaint up a little diagram, then I'll post it with how to make it. I've never made wine, but I know how to make hard apple cider.

    In the mean time:


    http://www.sentex.net/~bacchus/faq.html <--- has a LOT of info, as well as a link to a video.

    *edit*

    Shit, I realized that I have no idea how to make wine, but as far as crude liquor goes, THAT I can help with!

    873342-1.png
  • Seattle ThreadSeattle Thread The fuck am I looking atRegistered User regular
    edited July 2005
    Add yeast & water, stir, let the yeast eat the sugars in the grapes for about a month or so, and boom--you've got wine.


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  • archonwarparchonwarp Registered User regular
    edited July 2005
    Makershot wrote:
    Add yeast & water, stir, let the yeast eat the sugars in the grapes for about a month or so, and boom--you've got wine.

    Hardly...

    220370Making_wine.gif


    How to make wine. This can be done for any type of fruit to make some type of alcoholic substance! WOoohoo!


    What you will need to do:
    Squeeze the grapes yourself. You can do this with grapejuice in a bottle, but you will need to add yeast. Naturally occuring yeast on the fruit should be enough to do the reaction-- you don't NEED to add any, but just for insurance, do so.


    Drill a hole all the way through the cork slightly smaller than the plastic tubing. I reccomend starting with nothing more than a small hole, and slowly widening it, continually trying to push the tubing through. This hole MUST BE AIRTIGHT! I cannot stress that enough! You can find this tubing anywhere (try checking the aquarium section of a petstore). Once you've jammed the tubing into the hole, take a hot glue gun, or whichever type of glue you have available, and seal around the hole on both sides (just for added protection). The tube should not poke past on the other side of the cork when inserted.

    Get a jar smaller than the amount of juice you have. You MUST fill the jar to the very brim. As ethenol is only produced in a lack of oxygen, this jar needs to be filled so that no air is available (unless you want to make vinegar). Mix in the honey (For every gallon of juice you make, you need at least a half pound (1/4 kilo?) of sugar/honey). This is crucial, as this is extra food to make more alcohol. [When my friend did this, he used a pound of sugar, in a gallon of juice. We were was using apples, which have less natural sugar than grapes. I reccomend using at least 3/4 a pound of honey, but I know it's expensive]. Pour in the juice all the way up to the brim. It should be REALLY full-- like forming a sphere from surface tension on the top full. Pound the cork in place, and you're ALMOST READY!!!!


    Fill up the little glass with water. Run the plastic tubing into the glass. As the yeast ferments the sugar, it will emit CO2. The Tubing is to vent off the CO2. The reason it's submerged is to keep fresh air from continually flowing into the bottle. Keep an eye on the bottle for the first two days, checking periodically that the cork isn't going to pop off (which would mean the CO2 isn't venting).


    After a while, you will see big whiteish clumps form. These are yeast colonies. It's pretty disgusting, but hey. Use some coffee filters, and a funnel, and pour the juice out and let it funnel into another jar. Only pour out a small amount. Taste this. If it tastes like alcohol, and you enjoy the taste, you're ready. If it tastes like vinegar, it's not going to be drinkable. Somehow, you let oxygen get into the mix. You can use it as vinegar if you want :-p. It may need more time to ferment, however. If the small amount you tasted doesn't seem done yet, add in a tad bit more grapes and sugar, and seal it up for a few more days (after clearing out the yeast colonies.

    ***note*** Clear out the yeast colonies before drinking, as they're pretty gross, and I doubt you want to drink them!


    The whole fermentation process will problably take a few weeks. You'll have around a gallon (or however much was in the jar) of wine whenever you're finished.


    *extra note*

    You can then freeze it in a large container, because the alcohol freezes at a much lower tempurature than water (the alcohol will go to the center/bottom, while the water will freeze. Pour out the alcohol, leave the water). You can then have distilled... wine, I guess. This will have A LOT more alcohol, but you lose some quantity since a lot of the water goes away. Anyway, enjoy the wine!

    Have fun, and be safe! *whew, that was a long post*

    873342-1.png
  • QuelrethQuelreth Registered User
    edited July 2005
    I'd just like to say this is the best H/A topic ever.

  • RNEMESiS42RNEMESiS42 Registered User
    edited July 2005
    This is the way I've been making crappy wine in empty milk jugs for about two years. I don't know how much you'd have to change it to make it work with actual grapes. I'll read archonwarp's tutortial in a minute, I'm sure I could learn from it, heh.
    crap_wine.GIF
    Sometime halfway through the process you can shake up the jug a little, to jump start the yeast eating the sugar a bit. Don't shake it up when you're getting ready to extract the solution. At the bottom of the jug will be nasty nasty dregs, which is dead alcohol saturated yeast. Siphon out the wine, or pour it very carefully, then filter it through a coffee filter. I'd recommend siphoning it and then filtering it. You can drink the dregs if you want to, though, heh. This process could have been explained a lot better...I bet there's a link somewhere with more detailed info. You're guaranteed to get something the first time you try, though!

    my apartment looks upside down from there
    water spirals the wrong way out the sink
  • ShogunShogun Hair long; money long; me and broke wizards we don't get along Registered User regular
    edited July 2005
    Wine will work I guess, but like, is there some way to make a fruity liquor? I mean hard ass fuckin' balls-to-the-wall shootin' fireballs liquor? Cause if there is I need to know it. I could be sitting on a miniture gold mine. Cadillac XLRV here I come.

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  • RNEMESiS42RNEMESiS42 Registered User
    edited July 2005
    Well, then you'd need to set up a distiller...get a stove...and risk going blind if you mess it up and get some toxins into the mix. Things might blow up, too. But if you're not stupid about it, it should be all right. I know usually hard alcohol is made using grain, corn, or potatoes...starchy things, I believe? I don't know how it'd work with grapes.

    my apartment looks upside down from there
    water spirals the wrong way out the sink
  • JohnnyCacheJohnnyCache Starting Defense Registered User regular
    edited July 2005
    You know, it's weird . . . my dad and stepmom own a vineyard, yet I have very little of value to add to this thread.

    I would say, however, that opaque jugs are probably better then clear ones.

    "Maybe we're here to eat the sandwich." -- Joe Rogan
  • see317see317 Registered User regular
    edited July 2005
    Regarding using sugar, I had heard somewhere (food network?) that yeast can't break down the complex sugar molecules that you get when you go buy a pound of sugar at the store, so you want to help them by breaking it into simpler sugar molecules by boiling it. That way the yeast has an easier time of making alcohol. Please remember though, that it's been a while since I saw that show, and it was on making beer, not wine.

    Also, if you want to get more kick out of the wine, do the freezer distillation trick mentioned by Archon earlier in this thread. You should be able to do it repeatedly getting a higher alcohol content (although less volume) each time up to a point. Ethanol (per Wikipedia) doesn't freeze until -114 degrees C. Very few domestic use freezers go anywhere near that low.

    Ringo wrote: »
    Well except what see317 said. That guy's always wrong.
  • archonwarparchonwarp Registered User regular
    edited July 2005
    see317 wrote:
    Regarding using sugar, I had heard somewhere (food network?) that yeast can't break down the complex sugar molecules that you get when you go buy a pound of sugar at the store, so you want to help them by breaking it into simpler sugar molecules by boiling it. That way the yeast has an easier time of making alcohol. Please remember though, that it's been a while since I saw that show, and it was on making beer, not wine.

    Also, if you want to get more kick out of the wine, do the freezer distillation trick mentioned by Archon earlier in this thread. You should be able to do it repeatedly getting a higher alcohol content (although less volume) each time up to a point. Ethanol (per Wikipedia) doesn't freeze until -114 degrees C. Very few domestic use freezers go anywhere near that low.

    Exactly. The problem with trying to make "balls to the walls alcohol" is that the alcohol content becomes so great that it basically kills the yeast once it becomes strong enough. Distillation is the way that you 'overcome' this 'problem'.

    I hadn't read about sugar molecules being too complex to break down, but I'm not quite sure about that. Also, do NOT boil your juice (especially if it's fresh squeezed) as boiling kills the natural yeast present.




    RNEMESIS42,

    In your method, do you often have air in your container? I've known this to cause problems with people in that they end up getting vinegar instead of wine.

    873342-1.png
  • Seattle ThreadSeattle Thread The fuck am I looking atRegistered User regular
    edited July 2005
    RNEMESiS42 wrote:
    Well, then you'd need to set up a distiller...get a stove...and risk going blind if you mess it up and get some toxins into the mix. Things might blow up, too. But if you're not stupid about it, it should be all right. I know usually hard alcohol is made using grain, corn, or potatoes...starchy things, I believe? I don't know how it'd work with grapes.

    Any kind of alcohol will do.

    And a still... this is what I had originially thought was going to be done, hence my simple fermentation method. Stills are basically a large Alembic, so if you know that concept, that's what you have to make.

    1. Don't use a gas stove, or any source of open flame on a still.

    2. Get rid of the first 8-12 oz. that comes out of the still. That's Methanol, and it will make you sicker than sick.

    3. Boil slowly for the best result.

    I'm relucatant to give any more specific details, because of the dubious legality issue, here. You're OK to make some moonshine in Tennesee, but someone else reading this in Maine isn't.


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  • RNEMESiS42RNEMESiS42 Registered User
    edited July 2005
    archonwarp wrote:
    RNEMESIS42,

    In your method, do you often have air in your container? I've known this to cause problems with people in that they end up getting vinegar instead of wine.

    See, I'd never even heard that air would kill your wine. Although, my friend tried my method and some how totally screwed up, resulting in something with the taste up puke. I would think that air gets into the mixture while mixing (heard that shaking it up before adding the yeast pushes air into it the mixture which helps with taste?), but I don't think much gets in during the process. Since I use a balloon, and their elastic, I'm guessing the CO2 is able to get out of the holes, but air isn't able to get back in. I'll experiment and try to fill the concoction up to the brim. See if I get better wine.

    my apartment looks upside down from there
    water spirals the wrong way out the sink
  • stixs4321stixs4321 Registered User
    edited July 2005
    I imagine using mangoes for wine would make good wine. I've smelt some of the rotten ass mangoes at work and I must say they suprisingly smell like a decent wine.

    I agree that this an interesting topic, makes me want to make my own wine!

  • ShogunShogun Hair long; money long; me and broke wizards we don't get along Registered User regular
    edited July 2005
    If my conditions were optimal I'd be making a fruity liquor out of Dragon Fruit. But we don't get that oh so delicious fruit here in bumfuck TN. I began preperations to start some wine/alcohol, but I ate all the grapes I had with me while I was doing it. They're just too good. Going to get some more from my stock tomorrow.

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  • ceresceres Love is in the battlecry Nevada, USASuper Moderator, Moderator mod
    edited July 2005
    I know someone who made mango flavored mead, of all things. But it was really good. So I can definitely reccommend that if you can figure out how to throw it in there.

    He also made ice wine, and I'm told that's well worth the investment if you can get a hold of the supplies for it.

    JohnDies_zpsfe6c609e.jpg
    The avalanche has already started; it is too late for the pebbles to vote.
  • ShogunShogun Hair long; money long; me and broke wizards we don't get along Registered User regular
    edited July 2005
    ceres wrote:
    I know someone who made mango flavored mead, of all things. But it was really good. So I can definitely reccommend that if you can figure out how to throw it in there.

    He also made ice wine, and I'm told that's well worth the investment if you can get a hold of the supplies for it.

    Ice wine? Can you describe it? I've never heard of that.

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  • Dark MoonDark Moon Registered User regular
    edited July 2005
    I understand mead to be fermented honey, correct? I've always been told that, as honey is pretty much pure sugar, it is almost impossible to have it rot. How does one make honey ferment in order to make mead, then?

    3072973561_de17a80845_o.jpg
  • ShogunShogun Hair long; money long; me and broke wizards we don't get along Registered User regular
    edited July 2005
    Dark Moon wrote:
    I understand mead to be fermented honey, correct? I've always been told that, as honey is pretty much pure sugar, it is almost impossible to have it rot. How does one make honey ferment in order to make mead, then?

    From what I understand add some warm water and yeast. I'm sure there's more complicated jazz to it, but I think that's the raw basics. A question with my grapes...do I need actually put the grapes in with the yeast and water and shit? Or do I need to mash the grapes and strain the juice out and just use the juice?

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  • RNEMESiS42RNEMESiS42 Registered User
    edited July 2005
    A jar full of honey left in the sun can make meade, I've been told.

    my apartment looks upside down from there
    water spirals the wrong way out the sink
  • ceresceres Love is in the battlecry Nevada, USASuper Moderator, Moderator mod
    edited July 2005
    Shogun wrote:
    ceres wrote:
    I know someone who made mango flavored mead, of all things. But it was really good. So I can definitely reccommend that if you can figure out how to throw it in there.

    He also made ice wine, and I'm told that's well worth the investment if you can get a hold of the supplies for it.

    Ice wine? Can you describe it? I've never heard of that.
    I don't know that much about it, because I've never actually had any.. but I'm told it's just about the best thing ever.

    The way it was described to me, the can only make it in certain parts of Canada, using grapes that freeze on the vine. They get one drop from each grape, and use that to make the wine. Or that's how the story goes. But apparently you can get kits to make it at home.

    Mead has a strange taste, but I like it.

    JohnDies_zpsfe6c609e.jpg
    The avalanche has already started; it is too late for the pebbles to vote.
  • archonwarparchonwarp Registered User regular
    edited July 2005
    Shogun wrote:
    Dark Moon wrote:
    I understand mead to be fermented honey, correct? I've always been told that, as honey is pretty much pure sugar, it is almost impossible to have it rot. How does one make honey ferment in order to make mead, then?

    From what I understand add some warm water and yeast. I'm sure there's more complicated jazz to it, but I think that's the raw basics. A question with my grapes...do I need actually put the grapes in with the yeast and water and shit? Or do I need to mash the grapes and strain the juice out and just use the juice?


    Read my guide. Don't add ANY water unless it's juice from concentrate. Do whatever you can to get just the juice from the grapes. The less solids you have, the better. Solids will possibly give you problems with big clumps of yeast. Just squeeze the juice, put some honey in it, add some yeast, and seal up the jar with either the cork method, or the balloon method.

    873342-1.png
  • RNEMESiS42RNEMESiS42 Registered User
    edited July 2005
    I'm achin' to make more wine, now. I'm going to try it with the honey, and making it more airtight, like in archonwarp's method. I'll try the ice thing, too. Maybe I'll post pics along the way for fun.

    my apartment looks upside down from there
    water spirals the wrong way out the sink
  • archonwarparchonwarp Registered User regular
    edited July 2005
    RNEMESiS42 wrote:
    I'm achin' to make more wine, now. I'm going to try it with the honey, and making it more airtight, like in archonwarp's method. I'll try the ice thing, too. Maybe I'll post pics along the way for fun.

    Please do! I look forward to making some wine, as all I've ever done before was watch my buddy make hard cider. Btw, to get more honey into the grape juice, super saturate it by heating beforehand.

    873342-1.png
  • ceresceres Love is in the battlecry Nevada, USASuper Moderator, Moderator mod
    edited July 2005
    I <3 this thread so much that I am moving it to AFK. Just so you all know.

    JohnDies_zpsfe6c609e.jpg
    The avalanche has already started; it is too late for the pebbles to vote.
  • redstormpopcornredstormpopcorn Registered User regular
    edited July 2005
    Kitchen demigod Alton Brown did a Good Eats episode about homebrewing a while back (here's the recipe and pared-down instructions, the episode isn't on any of the DVDs released so far). It was predominately, if not entirely, about beer but I think most of the equipment guidelines and general concepts could be applied to any sort of amateur fermentation project.

    emot-kamina.gif BELIEVE IN YOU, WHO BELIEVES IN YOURSELF emot-kamina.gif
  • KnobKnob TURN THE BEAT BACK InternetSuper Moderator, Moderator mod
    edited July 2005
    archonwarp wrote:
    Makershot wrote:
    Add yeast & water, stir, let the yeast eat the sugars in the grapes for about a month or so, and boom--you've got wine.

    Hardly...

    220370Making_wine.gif


    How to make wine. This can be done for any type of fruit to make some type of alcoholic substance! WOoohoo!


    What you will need to do:
    Squeeze the grapes yourself. You can do this with grapejuice in a bottle, but you will need to add yeast. Naturally occuring yeast on the fruit should be enough to do the reaction-- you don't NEED to add any, but just for insurance, do so.


    Drill a hole all the way through the cork slightly smaller than the plastic tubing. I reccomend starting with nothing more than a small hole, and slowly widening it, continually trying to push the tubing through. This hole MUST BE AIRTIGHT! I cannot stress that enough! You can find this tubing anywhere (try checking the aquarium section of a petstore). Once you've jammed the tubing into the hole, take a hot glue gun, or whichever type of glue you have available, and seal around the hole on both sides (just for added protection). The tube should not poke past on the other side of the cork when inserted.

    Get a jar smaller than the amount of juice you have. You MUST fill the jar to the very brim. As ethenol is only produced in a lack of oxygen, this jar needs to be filled so that no air is available (unless you want to make vinegar). Mix in the honey (For every gallon of juice you make, you need at least a half pound (1/4 kilo?) of sugar/honey). This is crucial, as this is extra food to make more alcohol. [When my friend did this, he used a pound of sugar, in a gallon of juice. We were was using apples, which have less natural sugar than grapes. I reccomend using at least 3/4 a pound of honey, but I know it's expensive]. Pour in the juice all the way up to the brim. It should be REALLY full-- like forming a sphere from surface tension on the top full. Pound the cork in place, and you're ALMOST READY!!!!


    Fill up the little glass with water. Run the plastic tubing into the glass. As the yeast ferments the sugar, it will emit CO2. The Tubing is to vent off the CO2. The reason it's submerged is to keep fresh air from continually flowing into the bottle. Keep an eye on the bottle for the first two days, checking periodically that the cork isn't going to pop off (which would mean the CO2 isn't venting).


    After a while, you will see big whiteish clumps form. These are yeast colonies. It's pretty disgusting, but hey. Use some coffee filters, and a funnel, and pour the juice out and let it funnel into another jar. Only pour out a small amount. Taste this. If it tastes like alcohol, and you enjoy the taste, you're ready. If it tastes like vinegar, it's not going to be drinkable. Somehow, you let oxygen get into the mix. You can use it as vinegar if you want :-p. It may need more time to ferment, however. If the small amount you tasted doesn't seem done yet, add in a tad bit more grapes and sugar, and seal it up for a few more days (after clearing out the yeast colonies.

    ***note*** Clear out the yeast colonies before drinking, as they're pretty gross, and I doubt you want to drink them!


    The whole fermentation process will problably take a few weeks. You'll have around a gallon (or however much was in the jar) of wine whenever you're finished.


    *extra note*

    You can then freeze it in a large container, because the alcohol freezes at a much lower tempurature than water (the alcohol will go to the center/bottom, while the water will freeze. Pour out the alcohol, leave the water). You can then have distilled... wine, I guess. This will have A LOT more alcohol, but you lose some quantity since a lot of the water goes away. Anyway, enjoy the wine!

    Have fun, and be safe! *whew, that was a long post*

    Yeast actually need oxygen to reproduce. Leave a few inches of air at the top of your fermenting vessel. Cutting off all the oxygen is a bad idea.

    The reason you use the airlock is to prevent bacteria from infecting your must, not to keep air out.

  • archonwarparchonwarp Registered User regular
    edited July 2005
    Knob wrote:
    archonwarp wrote:
    Makershot wrote:
    Add yeast & water, stir, let the yeast eat the sugars in the grapes for about a month or so, and boom--you've got wine.

    Hardly...

    [img.]http://img2.uploadimages.net/220370Making_wine.gif[/img]


    How to make wine. This can be done for any type of fruit to make some type of alcoholic substance! WOoohoo!


    What you will need to do:
    Squeeze the grapes yourself. You can do this with grapejuice in a bottle, but you will need to add yeast. Naturally occuring yeast on the fruit should be enough to do the reaction-- you don't NEED to add any, but just for insurance, do so.


    Drill a hole all the way through the cork slightly smaller than the plastic tubing. I reccomend starting with nothing more than a small hole, and slowly widening it, continually trying to push the tubing through. This hole MUST BE AIRTIGHT! I cannot stress that enough! You can find this tubing anywhere (try checking the aquarium section of a petstore). Once you've jammed the tubing into the hole, take a hot glue gun, or whichever type of glue you have available, and seal around the hole on both sides (just for added protection). The tube should not poke past on the other side of the cork when inserted.

    Get a jar smaller than the amount of juice you have. You MUST fill the jar to the very brim. As ethenol is only produced in a lack of oxygen, this jar needs to be filled so that no air is available (unless you want to make vinegar). Mix in the honey (For every gallon of juice you make, you need at least a half pound (1/4 kilo?) of sugar/honey). This is crucial, as this is extra food to make more alcohol. [When my friend did this, he used a pound of sugar, in a gallon of juice. We were was using apples, which have less natural sugar than grapes. I reccomend using at least 3/4 a pound of honey, but I know it's expensive]. Pour in the juice all the way up to the brim. It should be REALLY full-- like forming a sphere from surface tension on the top full. Pound the cork in place, and you're ALMOST READY!!!!


    Fill up the little glass with water. Run the plastic tubing into the glass. As the yeast ferments the sugar, it will emit CO2. The Tubing is to vent off the CO2. The reason it's submerged is to keep fresh air from continually flowing into the bottle. Keep an eye on the bottle for the first two days, checking periodically that the cork isn't going to pop off (which would mean the CO2 isn't venting).


    After a while, you will see big whiteish clumps form. These are yeast colonies. It's pretty disgusting, but hey. Use some coffee filters, and a funnel, and pour the juice out and let it funnel into another jar. Only pour out a small amount. Taste this. If it tastes like alcohol, and you enjoy the taste, you're ready. If it tastes like vinegar, it's not going to be drinkable. Somehow, you let oxygen get into the mix. You can use it as vinegar if you want :-p. It may need more time to ferment, however. If the small amount you tasted doesn't seem done yet, add in a tad bit more grapes and sugar, and seal it up for a few more days (after clearing out the yeast colonies.

    ***note*** Clear out the yeast colonies before drinking, as they're pretty gross, and I doubt you want to drink them!


    The whole fermentation process will problably take a few weeks. You'll have around a gallon (or however much was in the jar) of wine whenever you're finished.


    *extra note*

    You can then freeze it in a large container, because the alcohol freezes at a much lower tempurature than water (the alcohol will go to the center/bottom, while the water will freeze. Pour out the alcohol, leave the water). You can then have distilled... wine, I guess. This will have A LOT more alcohol, but you lose some quantity since a lot of the water goes away. Anyway, enjoy the wine!

    Have fun, and be safe! *whew, that was a long post*

    Yeast actually need oxygen to reproduce. Leave a few inches of air at the top of your fermenting vessel. Cutting off all the oxygen is a bad idea.

    The reason you use the airlock is to prevent bacteria from infecting your must, not to keep air out.


    So let it sit for a few hours before putting it in would you say? I assume that a whole packet of yeast should be plenty, but I'm not at pro at this-- I just saw a friend do it.

    873342-1.png
  • KnobKnob TURN THE BEAT BACK InternetSuper Moderator, Moderator mod
    edited July 2005
    Well, don't let it sit open to the air. An infection could set in easily.

    Just leave a decent amount of air between the top of your juice and the cap of your bottle.

    Also, pop it open for a minute or two every couple of days.

  • archonwarparchonwarp Registered User regular
    edited July 2005
    My wine is almost complete. I used four cans of walmart's frozen 100% juice concentrate. and 5 cups (prior to boiling) of water boiled with 12 oz of honey and 4 ounces of sugar added in. I let the mixture cool to around 100-110 Degrees, and added the yeast. I then put this in an empty water jug (same thing as what's used for milk, but it never had milk in it), and put a balloon ontop.

    I sampled it a few days ago and found that it had NOT turned to vinegar, which excited me a lot :-D. However, it did seem too thick, so i added a cupfull of warm water. I strongly reccomend not doing this, as it seemed to really slow the reaction of yeast in my wine, although that could just be caused by most of the sugars being fermented, or the amount of alcohol present killing the yeast.

    873342-1.png
  • a penguina penguin Registered User
    edited August 2005
    I haven't made wine in a looooong time. I'm setting my sights on beer in the future, I'll let you all know how that turns out :P

    We made wine in micro lab, turned out pretty good. Sadly, they're the only notes I couldn't locate to help you guys out. Let's see what I can remember...


    Sanitation is a good thing. The bacteria normally floating around in the world can do terrible things to wine making attempts. Sulfites inhibit the growth of these guys.

    Air is bad, 'cept in the beginning. That was already said though.

    A google search gave me this crazy guy, lots of good info.
    http://winemaking.jackkeller.net/

    Hope it turns out well. It's easy to make rocket fuel, which I guess is good if you're looking to get to' up.[/url]

    This space eventually to be filled with excitement
  • VoodooVVoodooV Registered User regular
    edited March 2007
    bottled my third batch of homebrew tonight. a dos ecquis clone :) just gotta let it carbonate :)

  • nefffffffffffnefffffffffff Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    I didnt take the time to read through the entire thread to see if this has been said yet so sorry if it has.
    Shogun wrote: »
    Here in TN making alcohol isn't illegal when done properly and staying within the legal alcohol limits. I want to make some wine/crude liquor.

    when you say crude liquor what do you mean? making alcoholic beverages isn't illegal in small quantities, but distilling anything that already has alcohol in it to make it more concentrated is illegal on the federal level without a license, regardless of what state you are in.
    You can then freeze it in a large container, because the alcohol freezes at a much lower tempurature than water (the alcohol will go to the center/bottom, while the water will freeze. Pour out the alcohol, leave the water). You can then have distilled... wine, I guess. This will have A LOT more alcohol, but you lose some quantity since a lot of the water goes away.

    You're basically talking about making brandy, which is distilled wine.

    Thats called freeze distilling, and while not technically distilling (no evaporation is involved) it is still illegal here in the US. (as a side note it works with beer too, but doesn't taste great)

    As long as you are doing this on a small scale it shouldn't be too big a deal, but if you ever get caught for some reason or another its a HUGE fine.

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