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So you want to draw a webcomic

MrFisticuffsMrFisticuffs Registered User
edited May 2011 in Ancient Forum Knowledge
Every day, thousands of new webcomics are created, and every day we are assaulted by them. I've resigned myself to the fact there is no stemming the tide of horrible new comics, so this is an effort in hopefully increasing the general quality of webcomics.

In this article, we'll explore the reasons for starting a webcomic, the do's and don'ts of maintaining one, and the most common mistakes I see in new webcomic artists.

Hay! Scott Kurtz is fat and rich! I will start an online comic and be fat and rich too, duder!
First things first. Why do you want to create an online comic? If you want fame and/or fortune, then forget it. There are an uncountable number of webcomics available on the internet right now, and less than .1% of them have much of a following at all. Of the ones that do have a following, less than .1% of those generate enough income to support the artist. So, toss that idea right out of your head.

So, got that all clear? Your webcomic is not going to make you rich or famous. You'll be working a thankless job and spending your own money to essentially operate a business that loses money. If you can generate a high-quality comic consistantly for three or four years, then maybe you'll start breaking even. Maybe. But don't bank on it.

Still want to do your own comic? Alright, then let's get right down to it.

It's about a three headed dog and his adventures in the dimension of cannibals, duder.
So you're determined to so this thing. Right. Now, what is your comic about? If you can't come up with anything better than 'It's just about me and my friends and our wacky adventures', then stop now. Odds are, this sort of comic will be chock full of inside jokes, and only appeal to your circle of friends. Also, try and come up with something a little more clever than 'it's two guys who love videogames' or any other topic that's been done to death.

Things to avoid
1. Comics starring two guys who are both passionate about one thing, be it movies, games, pet grooming, punk rock, cooking, auto repair, etc.
2. Comics that rely on inside jokes
3. Comics without any sort of unifying theme
4. Comics with too narrow of a focus, such as 'It's a strip that focuses on a dysfunctional family who is really into knitting woolen covers for vintage WWII helmets'. Don't stab yourself in the foot by being too broad or too narrow.

duder, mah friends think I'm funny!
Now, you've got your concept. It's fresh and original, and it'll knock the socks off of the knitting covers for WWII helmet livejournal community. At this point you need to ask yourself a very serious question.

'Can I write this thing?'


So many webcomics suffer from terrible, terrible writing. Ask yourself the following questions. Answer them honestly.

1. Can I spell? Do I understand basic grammar?
2. Can I write interesting and convincing dialog?
3. Am I funny? Can I be consistently funny without being stale, lame or derivative?
4. Can I convey emotion with my writing?

Now go back and answer them again, because I know you just lied and said yes to all of them.

If you can't write, you need to either get ahold of someone who can, or find something else to do with your time.

My mom sez I'm the best drawer in our family, duder
Now, here's what some would say is the most important part:

CAN YOU DRAW?

If you're just starting to learn to draw, then for the love of fucking god, DO NOT START A WEBCOMIC.

If you are a mediocre artist, then DO NOT START A WEBCOMIC.

Take your ideas, put them in a notebook, and tuck that notebook under your bed. Take some classes, and get a few years of practice under your belt. Yes, a few years. I don't care if your new comic is the most scathingly brilliant piece of literature to ever grace this green earth, if it looks like shit, then it is shit. The same goes for writing. You can create the most beautiful art that makes angels weep, but if your dialog reads like:

Duder A: omg the xbox id fckuing huge

Duder B: teh xbox is so big that it is going to fuck ur mon u fag

Duder A: haha my mom iz a whore

then you need to stop. Seriously.

i am posting on teh intarweb duderz
Awesome art? Check. Brilliant writing? Check. If you were creating your comic traditionally, that might be enough. But no, you had to throw your creation to the internet. Which means you need a website.

Effective site design plays more of a factor in readership than you'd think. This is an article about comics, not web design though, so I'll just run through a few common mistakes.

NO-NOs
1. Putting newsrants on the front page with no comics. I came to read your comic, not to listen to you squelching and wheezing about whatever's got you pissed today. If you must include newsposts, put them underneath the comics, or put them on a separate page. Or better yet, just include a link to your blog. We came for comics. Don't force us to read or navigate around your soap-boxing. (This exact thing is one of the main reasons that Ctrl-Alt-Del can kiss my ass. Get over yourself, Buckley. Tycho Brahe may be the one exception to this rule, because damn, that dude is entertaining.)
2. Music. Don't put goddamned music in your webpage. This should be common sense by now.
3. Hideous/tacky/vibrant color scheme. If your page pops up and burns out the retinas of your viewers, then don't count on them coming back.
4. Cthulhan design. Make sure everything is easy to find. Make sure your scripts are functional, your links aren't dead, and everything is easily accessible. You'd think this'd be obvious, but it's the most common mistake I see.
5. Pages behave differently in different browsers. As much as you may hate it, IE is still the most prevalent web browser in use. At the very least, make sure your page works correctly in IE, Mozilla, and FireFox. Just to be nice, you'll probably want to test it on some other browsers as well.

whoa thanks for tha crits duder
So. We've got decent art, compelling writing, and intelligent web design. Only one thing remains: You've committed yourself this far, so make sure you KEEP THE MOTHERFUCKER UPDATED. If you say you've got a comic coming on Wednesday, then put a damn comic up on Wednesday. I don't care how awesome your comic is, it needs to be up when you say it'll be up.

If you can confidently follow all of these guidelines, then by all means, create your comic. Hell, I'd love to read it.

Hugs and Kisses,
-Papa Fisti


Addendum for the original post.


So you want to make a comic? Cool, so does everyone else.

The problem nowadays is that there is literally an ocean of webcomics out there, all scrambling for attention in this horrendous conglomerate mixture of general crap we computer-savvy folks like to call the Internet. Sure, you can post anything you want online and have a virtually limitless worldwide audience. It's a selling point of the internet, and has been since its conception. The unfortunate side effect being that it becomes a breeding ground for copycats, resulting in a good percentage of the webcomics out there being mirrors (in both storyline and style) of the ones who actually made it to the top of the popularity chain.

But I thought comics just had to have good writing/art to be good!

As highlighted in the above article, both writing and art form are important to make a comic great. These will both work together to make your stuff stand above the rest of the online culture. However, these alone will fall short if you do not know the basics of properly producing a comic.

Whether or not you're planning on someday going professional with your work, there are still industry standards which should be respected, if not followed. If you choose to just throw together something and call it a comic but show complete disregard for the basics that all comic artists should understand, then you'll be thrown down in the thralls of the lame, even if your comic has the "B3ST 4RT EVAR."

First stop: Comic Pages vs. Strips

Do you want to make a page-by-page comic book, or are you hoping to embrace the newspaper-style comic strip? This must be determined before you start, as the rules for measurements differ between them.

Let's discuss general industry-accepted proportions.

The Comic Strip
2.5" x 9" for dailies, 4" x 9" for Sundays (depending on where you want to place your title and the format of your sundays -- horizontal vs. vertical -- the Sunday measurement will vary)

The Comic Book/Graphic Novel
Generally following a 2:3 image ratio for each page. Most books are published around a 6" x 9" active area, give or take.

But how can they fit in so much detail if it's so small?

Calm down. The proportions are meant to serve as guidelines for the comic artist. When producing a comic, WORK LARGE. This means that you should scale the proportions up to at least twice the recommended size, allowing for more detail and cleaner line quality when printing. Drawing a comic strip at 4" x 17.5" or a comic page at 10" x 15" would be acceptable (and preferred by most professionals in the business). These aren't required, though, and you should find a size to work in that is comfortable for you.

Understand? Good, let's move on.

Next Stop: Materials

Go to your local art store. Bring your wallet, a check/debit card, or your mom if you have to. Pick up the following items.

- Bristol Board. Vellum. 14" x 17". Lots of it.
- Artists' tape. Lots of it.
- Non-photo blue pencils. Lots of them. I recommend the Col-Erase brand.
- A t-square.
- A straightedge/ruler.
- A triangle. 30-60 variety. Two of them, a small one and a big one.
- Pens/brush for inking (I won't go into details with the methods for each here, there are other guides for that)
- KNEADED eraser. The gray kind that looks like old play-doh and is a good distraction from math class.

If you're going to make a comic book, do not be tempted to buy the "pre-printed pages" that some places sell. Most of them are printed on cheap paper that smears the ink the moment it is laid down.

Final Stop: Things Every Comic Should Have

Now that you have your supplies and your size guidelines, let's get some of the basics down. If you don't follow these, your comic WILL look amateur, no matter how hard you cry and burn candles in prayer for it to appear otherwise.

Vital Trait #1: Gutters

Pick up a copy of your favorite comic book or turn to the comics page of the newspaper. Pick any page/comic and look hard. Notice the empty space between the panels. Heck, notice that the panels are separated to begin with. Most kids starting their own comics fail to see this, and I can't understand why.
Those empty spaces are called gutters. They ARE important, and serve as a medium of time spacing in the comic. Having a break between panels shows that there is the passage of time, and this is of the utmost importance when you're telling a story. If you have a line of panels that are all directly adjacent, it's as if they're all happening simultaneously. Unless your character is in all places at once, this is generally not preferred.
So please, separate your panels. Make them individuals and take the time to rule the borders appropriately. Your readers will thank you in the end.

Vital Trait #2: Text Guides

Take your ruler and put it perpendicular to the top of a panel. Measuring downwards, make equal marks, roughly 3/8" - 1/4" apart. Then take your t-square and make LIGHT lines, all the way across the page. Yes, even across the borders of the panels. It's non-photo blue, so it won't show up when you scan it.
These are called text guides. They are like the blue lines you see on your school notebook paper. It's a good way to keep your text even and well-balanced on the page. Too many times an amateur artist will throw the text down without thinking twice, resulting in a slanting word bubble. You don't want to give your readers vertigo.
Also, make sure that all the text in your comic match up on the same guides. In other words, don't make two word bubbles with guides that don't line up with each other.
This isn't a difficult concept to grasp, and it makes you look all the more professional in the end.

Vital Trait #3: Written Text vs. Typed

I can't stress this enough: if you know you have crappy handwriting, do not try and write your dialogue by hand. If YOU have a hard time reading what the characters are saying, Lord only knows what your readers will think.
If you insist on using hand-written methods, then practice, practice, PRACTICE. Handwriting and penmanship tutorials can be found in many places. Developing a comic-style scripting is not as difficult as one might think. It's time-consuming and takes a lot of effort, but it's possible.
For those choosing to go the digital route, heed this warning: COMIC SANS IS NOT A FONT FOR COMICS. If you think otherwise, you have no business making a comic.
Do searches online. Find comic fonts that work for your style. Try visiting http://www.blambot.com. Just don't use anything that isn't intended for commercial use if you plan on getting your work published.
Or better yet, combine the two. Develop a personalized (and legible) style of handwriting, and then scan in sample letters to create your own font using any number of programs out there. This way you can have your hand-written font and keep the digital method.
Coloring techniques fall into the same category. Traditional or digital, it is entirely up to you and your abilities. Just be wise and understand that if you don't know how to color something properly by hand, your readers may have a difficult time deciphering it. There's a level of wisdom required for creativity.

Vital Trait #4: Camera Angles and Stagnant Characters

A camera? In a comic book? You bet your sweet bippy, and it exists in the eye of the reader.
Camera angles are important in film and photography, so why shouldn't they be important in comics? When a camera remains static, the action is lost and the work becomes boring. Then the characters stop moving altogether, producing an endless stream of dialogue bubbles in a copy-pasted panel layout. The reader then falls asleep.
This is what is known as "Talking Head Syndrome," hereafter referred to as THS. When dealing with THS, the characters remain in one position, one perspective, and speak without any form of body language or other interaction. These aren't puppets, folks. These are drawings, and as an artist you should MAKE THEM MOVE! You are their God! They do what you tell them to do, and by all means, get their asses moving!
THS is easily avoided. Move the camera around. Go for different views. Try an over-the-shoulder shot. A mouse-eye view. Three-point perspective (a bitch for some folks, but the dynamic angle is really eye-catching). Have your characters show emotion through hand positions and body language. Depressed? Hunch over. Happy? Wave those arms! Go crazy with it and people will be moving from page to page before you know it.

Vital Trait #5: Backgrounds Are People, Too!

One of the most common mistakes a beginning comic artist can make is to forsake the backgrounds. So often you see characters floating in some numbing blanket of white, as if existing in a single plane of nothingness. Or perhaps swimming in a giant glass of milk, who knows? Surely not the reader.
Establishing shots are vital, kiddies. In the first panel, show the environment in its entirety. An aerial shot usually does the job nicely. Give the reader an idea of where the action takes place, in some way or form. If the characters are in school, show lockers along the wall. If they're in jail, show the bars. In the woods? Trees, grass and wild animals running amok.
Don't skimp on details, either. Poorly-drawn backgrounds will do as much damage to your comic as bad writing. Take the time and effort to draw that tree properly. If you don't know how to draw a tree, learn. Don't just skip drawing it altogether. Even if you're doing a simple comic strip, the backgrounds are important. Heck, even Beetle Bailey has details of the buildings and environments. You can have it, too.

Am I ready?

If you decide to follow these general guidelines, both here and in the above article, then you should do fine. One final bit of advice I should give is that, as with any type of artist, you should never stop working outside your comfort zone.
Experiment. Test new grounds. Draw different styles. Draw from life. Write from experience. Write what you know. Become a better artist through practice and diligence. Don't be afraid to do the hard work.

No one ever said being a comic artist was going to be quick & easy.

Best wishes in your sequential ventures,
-Jon Ponikvar

MrFisticuffs on
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Posts

  • Manga PenguinManga Penguin Registered User
    edited July 2005
    Remember that time I made a webcomic? Good times.

    Well organized and easy to read tutorial/guidlines, Fisti. A+.

  • AliasTheJesterAliasTheJester Registered User
    edited July 2005
    nice one fisteh. this thread should be kept on hand. :^:

  • art monkeyart monkey Registered User
    edited July 2005
    Fisti, you covered all the main pointers there, indeedy.

    It's really true about the 4 year thing too, unless your comic has appeal, or even *gasp* mass appeal.

    Some comics are a hit straight off the bat, like Tauhids Spells and Whistles when it came out. I think he hit the 5000+ unique mark in his first 6 months if I remember correctly, which is a great achievment for a new comic.
    But, in context to your tut, T had all things required of his comic staight away, no learning curve required.

  • Cave MonsterCave Monster Registered User
    edited July 2005
    This is very nice. I think you may want to add a section on deciding what you really want out of you comic. Not everyone wants mass appeal and commercial success and that may effect the other areas. For instance, someone learning how to draw could post a webcomic as a method of practice that generates wide feedback, driving the artist towards better work.

    The stars are prettyLet's go there.
  • KnobKnob TURN THE BEAT BACK InternetModerator mod
    edited July 2005
    art monkey wrote:
    Fisti, you covered all the main pointers there, indeedy.

    It's really true about the 4 year thing too, unless your comic has appeal, or even *gasp* mass appeal.

    Some comics are a hit straight off the bat, like Tauhids Spells and Whistles when it came out. I think he hit the 5000+ unique mark in his first 6 months if I remember correctly, which is a great achievment for a new comic.
    But, in context to your tut, T had all things required of his comic staight away, no learning curve required.

    Tauhid had all the elements straight off the bat, but also keep in mind that he's a pretty big name, and he also knows people with some clout.

    It's like if Gabe & Tycho decided to do a separate comic from PA. It would enjoy almost instant success.
    This is very nice. I think you may want to add a section on deciding what you really want out of you comic. Not everyone wants mass appeal and commercial success and that may effect the other areas. For instance, someone learning how to draw could post a webcomic as a method of practice that generates wide feedback, driving the artist towards better work.

    They'd be better off taking classes, or even posting regularly on an art forum.

  • AliasTheJesterAliasTheJester Registered User
    edited July 2005
    and don't forget the years and years of drawing and writing beforehand. edit: in relation to the tauhid thing

  • art monkeyart monkey Registered User
    edited July 2005
    Knob wrote:
    Tauhid had all the elements straight off the bat, but also keep in mind that he's a pretty big name, and he also knows people with some clout.

    I didn't realise he was known outside of this forum until he made S&W.

    I think that touching on appeal and mass appeal would be very appropriate in this thread actually.

    It was very helpful for me, when I read it from pvp's rants.
    Even though I hate Kurts, that piece had alot of insite.

  • KamiKami Registered User regular
    edited July 2005
    I agree with these points wholeheartidly.

    I'll admit I'm not the best artist, but the reason I'm creating mine is to:

    1) Practice with sequential storytelling

    2) Actually tell my story (which won a few awards around my college's area, hooray for money)

    and

    3) Work on natural human communication in my art.

    I'm fascinated with the act of human relationships, so it drives me to study from life, so I can create interesting scenarios people can relate to.

    steam_sig.png
  • eminkey2003eminkey2003 Registered User
    edited July 2005
    Aw, man. I was going to make a comic strip about sitewhoring and web comics on PAAC. Oh, well, maybe I'll post it here if I ever finish it. Nice advice, Fisticuffs. I disagree about news posts though (even though I'm not a big fan of Ctrl-Alt-Del). News posts often set up the inspiration and explanation for the latest comic. If they're just about the artist's day, than obviously no one will care. However, they also create a sense of community, letting the readers know that the mind behind their beloved comic is not just some guy who puts out comics for his own pleasure, but someone to whom they can relate. Tycho's posts are great most of the time. "I was actually thinking about pawning some of these Pikmin 2 copies and putting the proceeds towards a firearm with which to make myself die." :)

    I am Man-yam, part man, and part yam. I love yams and I love mans, and what a yam-man I am.
  • OrikaeshigitaeOrikaeshigitae Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited July 2005
    This seems like a good article, duder.

  • Forbe!Forbe! Registered User regular
    edited July 2005
    Awesome post. Definately something i'll be linking in the future.

  • SonicSonic Registered User regular
    edited July 2005
    I fully endorse copying this text to the Rules thread and Useful Crits thread simultaneously.

    :^: :^:

  • TheBogTheBog Registered User regular
    edited July 2005
    I totally approve of the abundant use of the word "duder".

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  • Stupid Mr Whoopsie NameStupid Mr Whoopsie Name Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited July 2005
    Threads without art in them will be LOCKED!

    I mean, nice work soldier. We will now consume your work and take credit for it.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • chewiechewie Registered User
    edited July 2005
    I remember when I made a web comic....sigh......

    *openly weeps*

    you want some art..i got your art right here

    *digs out old comic making fun of web comics*

    Humility.jpg

  • ToadTheMushroomToadTheMushroom Registered User
    edited July 2005
    Rule Number one.

    Dear god never think your comic is any good without getting crits. How many times do you see on these boards -Sketch Dump Dudez, i like this it totally rocks.

    Then again you do get a lot of crit threads which is good.

    Also, good art isnt the cornerstone of the comic, if you mean like good quality lines, coloring etc, thats a must, but ur characters dont have to be realistic or anything.


    And if its about 2 guys who like video games, fuck off.

    He seems to project beyond himself, exerting a kind of Reggie Field that dogs and many birds find unpleasant. Hearing a man speak with this much drive and confidence about an imaginary plumber is sort of enthralling.
  • Mojo_JojoMojo_Jojo When life gives you lemons... ...eat your delicious lemonsRegistered User regular
    edited July 2005
    Heh, that was quite a good read. Although I think the site design section needs an extra bullet.

    "Avoid the need to scroll in order to see the entirety of the damn comic."

    Seemingly about 50% of comics put a load of crap above their comic panel and this force you to scroll down slightly to view it. This is an unforgiveable sin in my eyes. And not this isn't a problem with my resolution, I run at 1280x1024.

    Homogeneous distribution of your varieties of amuse-gueule
  • PeterAndCompanyPeterAndCompany Registered User
    edited July 2005
    Or they run comics that, for some reason or another, they feel is necessary to make 18" wide instead of a standard comic page format, forcing the reader to scroll allllll the way to the right just to get a joke that probably isn't all that funny anyway.

    I think there needs to be an addition where someone putting together a webcomic should learn the proper methods and procedures to doing a comic in the first place. There are rules and guidelines to producing a piece of sequential art outside of just "good art and good writing." Dimensions, text placement and handling of dialogue bubbles, establishing shots, BACKGROUNDS VS. CHARACTER DETAILS. All important things.

    Other than that, this is a stellar piece of advice altogether. Good stuff.

  • DelzhandDelzhand motivated battle programmerRegistered User regular
    edited July 2005
    You should add something at the end about sitewhoring here. I know it's in the rules, but this thread is already pretty much masturbatory pretense, since the only people who will read it will not be the ones who ought to. If you could get this to come up as the homepage of everyone thinking about webcomics, that would be better.

    But that's not to say it's a bad post, just that you're preaching to the choir.

    jk0Btsj.png
  • TdotOdot2kTdotOdot2k Registered User
    edited July 2005
    You should definitely add a part about the site whoring. There is two real ways to do it, and one gets people mad.

    One way is to just flat out plug your comic everywhere you go, as I've noticed people do on forums like keenspace/comicgen, and keenspot. This tends to get people to hate you.

    The nice way to go about it is to do the following. Fanart, Fanart, and more Fanart. Maybe actually get to know people in the forums you visit, and if you find an art forum somewhere, show off some of your sketches, and ask for critique.

    You might not only get a reader or two, you might learn something awesome about how to improve your anatomy!

    Advertising tends to get people hits, but only for as long as the ad is up. Expect to only get a few readers for every bit of money you spend advertising....and that can vary from 5 bucks a week/month, to a grand a month.....but that's on sites like real life of ctrl+alt+del.


    Strange. I've never actually asked what advertising on PA would cost. I'll have to look into that.

    Back on topic though, I loved the post. People who make well thought out guidelines....it's very helpful to the new people, and I'm sure some of them appreciate it.

    Unfortunately, you're also going to get ones who say "OMFG I DUN CARE WUT U SAY, IM GONNA ROXX0R J00." or something to that effect. Let them weed themselves out, it'll happen eventually.

    Well written post. I really enjoyed it.

    3866.jpg
    Contestant of the 3x a Week Grind
  • KnobKnob TURN THE BEAT BACK InternetModerator mod
    edited July 2005
    Yeah, maybe I'll write a second article in the future about how to market your comic without being an annoying sitewhore.

    For this one, though, I just wanted to focus on the actual creation.

    And I don't give a shit if I'm 'preaching to the choir'. If this thing helps just one person turn their mediocre comic into something readable, then it's done it's job.

  • DelzhandDelzhand motivated battle programmerRegistered User regular
    edited July 2005
    Knob wrote:
    And I don't give a shit if I'm 'preaching to the choir'. If this thing helps just one person turn their mediocre comic into something readable, then it's done it's job.

    Choir or not, I'm sure we all appreciate your efforts. Maybe if I'd read this before I did my own short lived webcomic, I'd either a) not have wasted my time, b) been able to convince my friends that we're not funny enough for teh intarwebz, or c) produce a better product.

    It is sitewhoring to point out your own failed product that illustrates this thread well? My webcomic was prime example of many of these failings.

    jk0Btsj.png
  • RaddRadd Registered User regular
    edited July 2005
    Can't...handle...the pressure! GAHHHHHH!

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  • KnobKnob TURN THE BEAT BACK InternetModerator mod
    edited July 2005
    NOW WITH ILLUSTRATIONS!



    Figure 1a:
    webcomixduder.jpg

  • bombardierbombardier mr. mully Vancouver, BCModerator mod
    edited July 2005
    What the fuck is this Fisticuffs jazz? I THOUGHT WE WERE THROUGH!


    :cry:

  • PeterAndCompanyPeterAndCompany Registered User
    edited July 2005
    Would anyone object if I wrote an addendum to the article on the procedures to making a comic? Something telling the technical side of it, like proportions and measurements, things of that nature. Also balancing it whether or not you're going for a page-by-page comic book, or a newspaper-style comic strip... making guidelines for text placement, the importance of gutters, etc.

  • GrifterGrifter TorontoModerator mod
    edited July 2005
    Go for it, Pete.

  • PeterAndCompanyPeterAndCompany Registered User
    edited July 2005
    grifter81 wrote:
    Go for it, Pete.

    I'll type it up and post it in this thread tomorrow, but for right now I must get some more comic work done on my own plate. Hopefully someone can add it to the original post after it's done.

    Also, hopefully this thread won't have degraded any further into the flame wars of the "OMG U THOT MY COMIX SUX U SUCK HAHA UR MOMZ GAY" type.

  • NightDragonNightDragon Registered User regular
    edited July 2005
    *applauds the above*

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  • The CelestialThe Celestial Registered User
    edited July 2005
    Okay, between what Fisti and Pete said...I....

    I'm spellbound. People usually have to pay for this kind of help.

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  • GrifterGrifter TorontoModerator mod
    edited July 2005
    Added it to the first post in this topic.

  • PeterAndCompanyPeterAndCompany Registered User
    edited July 2005
    People usually have to pay for this kind of help.

    And I pass the savings onto you! :D

  • RaddRadd Registered User regular
    edited July 2005
    Act now!
    Destroy Unicron!
    Removes even the toughest stains!
    New improved Junkion planet is sleek sexy import with turbo handling!
    Resists fire, rain and corrosion for up to five years. Satisfaction guaranteed.
    Or your money back!

    sp-banner-long.gif
  • Foolster41Foolster41 Registered User
    edited July 2005
    What the heck? did a mod delete my post or was it an error?

    if the first: I wasn't trying to start any argument or anything, but rebuffing the words that were being put in to my mouth.
    I'm asuming: "OMG U THOT MY COMIX SUX U SUCK HAHA UR MOMZ GAY" was aimed at me, when I never said anything of the sort.

    lkbanner.jpg
  • PokerPoker Registered User, ClubPA
    edited July 2005
    Foolster41 wrote:
    What the heck? did a mod delete my post or was it an error?

    if the first: I wasn't trying to start any argument or anything, but rebuffing the words that were being put in to my mouth.
    I'm asuming: "OMG U THOT MY COMIX SUX U SUCK HAHA UR MOMZ GAY" was aimed at me, when I never said anything of the sort.

    Shut. The. Fuck. Up.

  • PeterAndCompanyPeterAndCompany Registered User
    edited July 2005
    Foolster, this thread is intended to help people who are open to guidance on the proper methods to putting together a comic. If you shut yourself off to the advice given in the original post, then none of us can help you. Your previous now-phantom posts -- which mutated into an argumentative flame war -- were detrimental to the quality of the thread and were hence deleted.

    Please, if you do not wish to contribute to the thread and only wish to pull attention to yourself and your inherent ignorance to the rules (not only of this forum, but of the comics business in general), then please remove yourself and have a good day.

    Oh, and OMG UR COMIX R THA BEST I GOTTA SHO MY M0M AND PUT IT ALL OVA MY NOTEBUK WIL U DR4W ME PIX 4 FREE I H4V3 N0 P3N15

  • Foolster41Foolster41 Registered User
    edited July 2005
    Point taken. I never ONCE said my webcomic was perfect. I even admited it wasn't very good. If you want to give usefull advice, then please give it.
    Just don't please put words in my mouth I never said, insinuating I threw insults

    I wasn't refering to those posts, I am glad they are gone, but a single post in repsonce to the OMG comment you made. I can see now how it apear I was refering to thoose. Sorry for the confusion.

    Bah Now I notice the letter from grifter. again I wasn't trying to start an argument, but deny an accusation that was still there. Sorry.

    lkbanner.jpg
  • PeterAndCompanyPeterAndCompany Registered User
    edited July 2005
    Foolster41 wrote:
    I have a right to freely speek my mind just as must as you... Just don't please tell put words in my mouth I never said.

    I feel I must as expressing mind of mine is freely the right as must as yours.

    And I'll let put words know not to put in your mouth things you never said.

  • ObiwanObiwan Nashville, TNRegistered User regular
    edited July 2005
    Poker wrote:
    Foolster41 wrote:
    What the heck? did a mod delete my post or was it an error?

    if the first: I wasn't trying to start any argument or anything, but rebuffing the words that were being put in to my mouth.
    I'm asuming: "OMG U THOT MY COMIX SUX U SUCK HAHA UR MOMZ GAY" was aimed at me, when I never said anything of the sort.

    Shut. The. Fuck. Up.
    Please.

    GOD I hate you Obiwan!
  • PeterAndCompanyPeterAndCompany Registered User
    edited July 2005
    Foolster41 wrote:
    again I wasn't trying to start an argument, but deny an accusation that was still there. Sorry.

    For future reference: if you have a beef with someone or something, contact them directly through PM's and attempt to resolve it yourself rather than complaining out in the open. Or message a mod and have them take care of it.

    Any and all attempts to defend yourself in a public forum (especially this one) will be met with more mockery and general tomfoolery at your expense.

    Going back to the point of this thread, I really hope the advice given here helps out forumers who are hoping to get into the comics realm on their own. I just wonder if there's a way to force all webcomic folks to read this.

    Maybe when they sign up with a new account, there should be a field that says "Are you a Webcomic artist, or hoping to become one soon?" If they answer yes, they are redirected to this thread to read before they can be allowed to sign up. Sort of like a user agreement type of thing.

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