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Job Hunting for a Developer

Nova_CNova_C Sniff Sniff SnorfBeyond The WallRegistered User regular
edited November 2007 in Help / Advice Forum
Well, I've decided to start looking for greener pastures. Problem is, the job I've had for the past two years I got through someone I went to school with. I honestly have no idea where to even start looking for a development position.

Ideally, I'd like to work for a company whose primary business is software, but that's flexible. I want to get away from web development, but I have a ton of experience with the technical side of it and will take what I can get. My primary experience is with Java, but I've worked with most web languages (HTML, javascript, vbscript, ASP and Java servlets), C++ and started working with .Net (C#) recently. I can pick up new languages quickly, especially if I have a project in that new language to focus me. Databases are also something I have a bunch of experience with, mostly MySQL and PostGreSQL.

So, basically, all you tech guys out there, how does one such as myself find a job?

Nova_C on

Posts

  • meekermeeker Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    The same way everyone else gets a job:
    Get a resume,
    Post it on Monster, Dice, Careerbuilder.
    Look in Newspaper Want ads (Sunday is best)
    Get interview
    Dress nice
    Follow up
    Step 4: Profit?

  • PirateJonPirateJon Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Most devs I know use headhunters.

    all perfectionists are mediocre in their own eyes
  • DogDog Registered User, Administrator, Vanilla Staff admin
    edited November 2007
    you don't happen to know COBOL? :winky:

  • Nova_CNova_C Sniff Sniff Snorf Beyond The WallRegistered User regular
    edited November 2007
    robothero wrote: »
    you don't happen to know COBOL? :winky:

    Haha, no.

    Anyway, the reason for this thread is I tried all that back when I graduated (Monster, classifieds) and I didn't get a single call. Not one. It took almost two years for me to get the job that I have now and like I said, I got it through a contact. There was no resume, no interview. I just had the job if I wanted it. I'm getting a guy to help me redo my resume to get moving on this, but I was just wondering if I had been going about it wrong the last time.

  • DogDog Registered User, Administrator, Vanilla Staff admin
    edited November 2007
    I found my job through a temp agency. Temp jobs suck, but fortunately mine was temp-to-hire, and I ended up getting hired full time about 3 months after starting.

    The good thing was, they did the dirty work for me. They got me like 3 interviews, talked me up like i was the ish, and really helped out.

    It's a great thing to do if your resume is barren and you don't have alot of experience.

  • SnowconeSnowcone Registered User
    edited November 2007
    Nova_C wrote: »
    robothero wrote: »
    you don't happen to know COBOL? :winky:

    Haha, no.

    Anyway, the reason for this thread is I tried all that back when I graduated (Monster, classifieds) and I didn't get a single call. Not one. It took almost two years for me to get the job that I have now and like I said, I got it through a contact. There was no resume, no interview. I just had the job if I wanted it. I'm getting a guy to help me redo my resume to get moving on this, but I was just wondering if I had been going about it wrong the last time.

    One route is to get involved with the online community for whatever job you are looking for. I know PHPDeveloper.org has job postings for PHP Devs everyday. Obviously you would be competing against anyone else in the community, but you never know.

  • AphostileAphostile Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    I would also suggest going straight to the companies you are interested in (the websites, that is) and look at their "Jobs" section. They usually even have their own resume submission page as well, just in case you want something more direct than Monster.

    Also, COBOL, woohoo, the most useless language I think I've ever learned. A factorial program that takes me next to nothing in C takes me pages in COBOL!

    Do people use it these days?

    Tinychat is dead. Long live Tinychat. D3 BTag: Aphostile#1366 OKC : Steam - ADD ME JERKS : Hello Satan! | Xbox Live : LastAphostile
  • DogDog Registered User, Administrator, Vanilla Staff admin
    edited November 2007
    My company is hiring a COBOL programmer or two.

  • JasconiusJasconius sword criminal Flo-ridaRegistered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Aphostile wrote: »
    Do people use it these days?

    A lot of ancient systems are still floating around that operate on COBOL, and since those companies are too cheap to do overhauls, they still hire out COBOL programmers to do maintenance and upgrades.

    According to a former professor of mine, who started on COBOL way back in the day, COBOL programmers can make some serious bank today.

  • AftyAfty Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Got my job through a recruitment agency and work for a good company now in the uk (web work).

    Never had any problems with recruitment agencies (touch wood never will again) but i have heard the odd horror story from people that were freelancing through umbrella companies.

    That might be a reasonable path for you aswell, try some freelance work and then use that for making a good impression.

  • TaterskinTaterskin Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Nova_C wrote: »
    Haha, no.

    Anyway, the reason for this thread is I tried all that back when I graduated (Monster, classifieds) and I didn't get a single call. Not one. It took almost two years for me to get the job that I have now and like I said, I got it through a contact. There was no resume, no interview. I just had the job if I wanted it. I'm getting a guy to help me redo my resume to get moving on this, but I was just wondering if I had been going about it wrong the last time.

    You have some work experience now. It should be easier to get interviews this time around.

  • kdrudykdrudy Registered User
    edited November 2007
    Nova_C wrote: »
    robothero wrote: »
    you don't happen to know COBOL? :winky:

    Haha, no.

    Anyway, the reason for this thread is I tried all that back when I graduated (Monster, classifieds) and I didn't get a single call. Not one. It took almost two years for me to get the job that I have now and like I said, I got it through a contact. There was no resume, no interview. I just had the job if I wanted it. I'm getting a guy to help me redo my resume to get moving on this, but I was just wondering if I had been going about it wrong the last time.

    So if I do the math correctly was it around 2002-2003 you were looking initially? If that is the case that was not a good time to look for development work, especially if you were fresh from college, the same exact thing happened to me. With experience and just a better time to look for that type of work you should do ok this route.

    tvsfrank.jpg
  • mastmanmastman Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    Just make sure you don't rush into a crappy job. Really look for a job you think you'd like. Ask a lot of questions. But yeah, with your experience, I imagine you can find a sweet job if you just spend the time looking.

    I bet there is local job search websites from wherever you are with a lot of good listings. Ask your friends if they know a guy who knows a guy who... this is teh uber easy way to get jobs too.

    ByalIX8.png
  • DogDog Registered User, Administrator, Vanilla Staff admin
    edited November 2007
    Jasconius wrote: »
    Aphostile wrote: »
    Do people use it these days?

    A lot of ancient systems are still floating around that operate on COBOL, and since those companies are too cheap to do overhauls, they still hire out COBOL programmers to do maintenance and upgrades.

    According to a former professor of mine, who started on COBOL way back in the day, COBOL programmers can make some serious bank today.

    my company is actually too worried about security problems with upgrading to newer systems. We only got XP in May.

  • CyberJackalCyberJackal Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    I think you'll find things a lot easier this time around, with that work experience under your belt. Regardless of whether you find anything new to try, you're still going to want to comb the job sites. Sometimes it works, seriously.

    Didn't see it mentioned, but try Craigslist too.

  • Nova_CNova_C Sniff Sniff Snorf Beyond The WallRegistered User regular
    edited November 2007
    All right, thanks guys. I'm gonna get my resume redone and then start the search. Luckily this time I am still employed and my job isn't in danger (yet), so I can take all the time I need.

  • SnowconeSnowcone Registered User
    edited November 2007
    I think you'll find things a lot easier this time around, with that work experience under your belt. Regardless of whether you find anything new to try, you're still going to want to comb the job sites. Sometimes it works, seriously.

    Didn't see it mentioned, but try Craigslist too.

    I second the Craigslist idea. I have a nice steady freelance gig I landed on Craigslist.

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