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Attend the Tale of Sweeney Todd

WyndhamPriceWyndhamPrice Registered User
edited January 2008 in Debate and/or Discourse
Why is there no discussion for this movie taking place?

I saw it on Friday night and it was really fucking awesome. A lot bloodier than I expected, and Johnny Depp can sing!

For those who don't know: Sweeney Todd is the story of a barber who comes home to London after being wrongly imprisoned for 15 years. He then sets out to get his revenge on the Judge who condemned him and took his life away. He meets Mrs. Lovett, the maker of the worst meat pies in London, and together they become part of Sweeney's mad quest for vengance, turning the upper class of London into meat pies while working their way up to Judge Turpin.

This is not your typical, fun Broadway-style musical. It is extremely dark and where it's funny it's even darker. I left the theater feeling a bit overwhelmed.

Also every time I see Sacha Baron Cohen nowadays I'm more and more impressed.

WyndhamPrice on
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Posts

  • HakkekageHakkekage Space Whore Academy summa cum laudeRegistered User regular
    edited December 2007
    his face was pale and his eye was odd

    He shaved the faces of gentlemen

    who never thereafter were heard of again

    3DS: 2165 - 6538 - 3417
  • clownfoodclownfood packet pusher in the wallsRegistered User regular
    edited December 2007
    I saw it on friday night. Here is the review I wrote for it for another site:
    I had two problems walking into this movie. First, I am a fan of the original Broadway musical. I am familiar with the story and very comfortable with its three hour length. Second, I had expectations going in. This never bodes well for any movie going experience.

    That being said, I liked the movie well enough. I had no problems with the acting or the singing. I think Depp and Carter did an adequate job singing their parts. I was actually pretty impressed with Ed Sanders who played Toby. Depp, while nailing the acting part, just didn't sit right with me for the singing role. George Hearn who played Todd in the 1982 production was a bass and it is quite possible that I am biased toward his singing. It just seemed that Hearn's singing was more haunting and even on the more humorous singing parts (like in "A bit of priest"), darker. Alan Rickman did a good job as Judge Turbin. Cohen's part as Pernelli was excellent even with his codpiece that would rival David Bowie's in Labyrinth. Johanna's character annoyed me a bit, but that character has always annoyed me and she has such minor role in the movie that I am just nit picking now.

    My biggest problems with this film is the sheer amount that was cut from the Broadway production and overly goth feel of this film. If you haven't seen it, see the movie first, enjoy it and then see the musical. The musical is around three hours and has quite a bit more musical numbers that were left out of the film. I understand the shortening of the story for the sake of mainstream appeal, it doesn't mean I have to like it. My other pet peeve is that this film just made me feel like Tim Burton just recycled what he has done in other films and made it fit Sweeney Todd. I like Tim Burton's films well enough. Ed Wood, Beetle Juice, Mars Attacks! and Edward Scissorhands are some of my favorite movies. But with Burton, there is often a certain stylistic stamp that he will bring to a story and it works here, for the most part. I laughed quite a bit through this movie, so I know the dark comedy was there. The sentencing part, the "Worst Pies in London" song, "A bit of Priest" song and the dream sequence with Carter, Depp and Sanders on the shore were all hilarious. Although because a dark movie has a few lighthearted spots, does not make it a dark comedy. That is what this story was supposed to be.

    This movie though was not a sum of all it's parts. It had moments of greatness that greatly entertained me but for some reason, the film as a whole did not sit right with me. Maybe it was because I had some seriously high expectations for it or because I had seen the musical by Stephen Sondheim. On it's own, it holds up well and is a decent treat. Now when stacked against the musical, it falls flat. Do yourself a favor and see the film first and enjoy that. Then see the Stephen Sondheim musical with George Hearn and Angela Landsbury and really treat yourself.

    By the way...how does Burton get away with making Sweeney Todd without including "The Ballad of Sweeney Todd?"

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  • JacobkoshJacobkosh Gamble a stamp. I can show you how to be a real man!Super Moderator, Moderator mod
    edited December 2007
    clownfood wrote: »
    By the way...how does Burton get away with making Sweeney Todd without including "The Ballad of Sweeney Todd?"

    I dunno, he made a Batman movie that barely had any Batman in it.

  • GimGim Long Live Biscuits Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    I liked it, but I was expecting about 5 more minutes for the ending.

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  • DukiDuki Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    I saw an awful, awful version of this at my High School. The story has been tainted forever.

  • Casual EddyCasual Eddy Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    The Ballad was left out, according to my boyfriend, to avoid making the movie seem like a full blown musical production. I like that song a lot but I can understand the decision to leave it off. Only the characters involved in what was going on sang songs and it made it seem a lot less cheesy. I find faults with your faults because Burton was making a movie for movie going audiences, not musical audiences.

  • QuidQuid The Fifth Horseman Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    I am seeing it this Christmas with Colleen. I expect enjoyment.

  • clownfoodclownfood packet pusher in the wallsRegistered User regular
    edited December 2007
    I find faults with your faults because Burton was making a movie for movie going audiences, not musical audiences.

    I figured my biggest problem after I got out of the show was my enjoyment of the original musical. Both my roommate and I shared this problem in fact. We stack it against the musical starring George Hearn and Angela Landsbury and realistically, you shouldn't. It should be judged on its own merits as a movie with some musical numbers.

    I am not saying that the movie isn't good. My girlfriend who saw it with me and my roommate loved the movie. I enjoyed parts of it. I am just saying that be it judged as a musical or film, it pales in comparison to the staged musical.

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  • OhtsamOhtsam Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    actually the ballad was originally intended to be in the movie
    They were going to have 3 men singing the chorus in between scenes
    however when production was set back due to Depp's daughter's sickness they didn't have time to include it so it was cut

  • BlackjackBlackjack Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    The Ballad of Sweeney Todd was left out because Johnny Depp's wife/son (I don't remember) got very ill and so he went home to be with his family, so they couldn't film it.

    Which is understandable, and I am sympathetic, but man. Two of the "ghosts" were being played by CHRISTOPHER LEE and ANTHONY STEWART HEAD.

    steam_sig.png

    3DS: 1607-3034-6970
  • WyndhamPriceWyndhamPrice Registered User
    edited December 2007
    If you pay attention after the shaving contest Anthony Stewart Head is the man who approaches Sweeney for like 5 seconds and compliments him.

    It's funny that most people remember George Hearn when Len Cariou is the guy on the original recording. Sidenote: My mom knows both these people (Hearn moreso) and has bought drinks for both on several occasions.

    EDIT: I like the original show and the ballad a lot too but I think that having the ballad would be redundant when it's meant to explain things that can't be shown during the stage production that can be easily shown on film.

    It really didn't feel like anything was missing, which is good.

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  • PicardathonPicardathon Registered User
    edited December 2007
    I'm going to see this movie on Tuesday.
    I'm pretty excited. I mean, a violent musical. Mixes two of my favorite things.

  • WyndhamPriceWyndhamPrice Registered User
    edited December 2007
    Blood everywhere. I actually had to look away from the screen for just a second to let my brain rest from all the spurting.

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  • cj iwakuracj iwakura The Rhythm Rogue Coral Springs, FLRegistered User regular
    edited December 2007
    I was involved in a high school production of this, so it's a play near and dear to me.

    I can't believe it's out already. :| I thought it was a Christmas release. I hope the theaters're open tomorrow.

    No Ballad makes me sad, but I'll deal.

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    蒼く咲く華 日は灯り 天に流れる | Kill The Past
  • JragghenJragghen Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    So it's apparently playing nowhere near my parents' house closer than like...60 miles away. I'll probably see it when I get back to California. On another topic though, it sounds like most of you have seen the large-scale production when making comparisons. Have any of you also had the opportunity to see the bare-bones revival version? I had the chance to see it in San Francisco (after having seen the original six years ago or so in DC). It's interesting, and very, very chilling in comparison. Also takes a hell of a lot more talent on the part of the actors/actresses.

    It takes a bit of getting used to, because there's no supporting cast (just the major characters that get names), and everyone is always facing outward, so you have to use your imagination a lot. There's only one set the whole time, and each of the actors/actresses not in the scene are playing the instruments - there's no pit. It actually meant very few changes, comparatively. Only one verse was cut from Pernelli's Miracle Elixer, and I can't really think of anything else that was cut other than a portion of the Parlor Songs. Additionally, the instruments have changed somewhat, with a rather major part being the accordion, which was outright haunting in the way it was used. As for some of the more brutal parts....
    Spoiler:


    Anyway, I got completely off-topic. I'm highly looking forward to this movie, and can't wait to see it, either here or back in California.

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  • cj iwakuracj iwakura The Rhythm Rogue Coral Springs, FLRegistered User regular
    edited December 2007
    I actually think I have seen that version, or at least something similar.
    Spoiler:

    Ironically, I've never seen a large-scale production of the play.

    fiV9i14.jpg
    蒼く咲く華 日は灯り 天に流れる | Kill The Past
  • JragghenJragghen Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    cj iwakura wrote: »
    I actually think I have seen that version, or at least something similar.
    Spoiler:

    Ironically, I've never seen a large-scale production of the play.

    It was originally a "classic" musical - complex sets, huge cast, etc. What I expect the movie is like. However, this one place was putting on a production in London, and basically had jack for cash - couldn't afford to do it the whole way. So the director thought "what if I remove the pit and the extras. That'd save money." And he redesigned everything, the songs, the score, the staging, etc. Sondheim saw it (whether invited, or sent to approve I don't recall), and thought it was brilliant. It reopened a year or two back on Broadway and was a huge hit, and just started the tour a few months ago - starting in San Francisco, when I got to see it.

    It was fun to make the comparison. None of the others I went with had seen the original, and it was kinda hard for them to follow some of the stuff (the crowd that was supposed to be chasing the boy peddling the miracle elixir, etc). Oh, one other thing which got cut, in retrospect - the tooth pulling portion of the competition. But that was also pulled from the older production I saw, only know about it from the original soundtrack.

    I also liked the latter version better because I could understand what was being said. The original production I saw had actors/actresses too focused on vibrating their tones when singing, and not enough on making their lyrics coherent.

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  • CantideCantide Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    The only version of Sweeney Todd I've seen is the 2001 concert version, with George Hearn and Patti LuPone. It's not a large-scale production in terms of sets ( just an empty stage with people ) or props ( just the bare minimum ), but it's got a full orchestra and a huge chorus, which is more important to me. I've got it on my iPod, and usually watch/listen to it once or twice a month.

    I'll probably go see the movie eventually, but the way I've seen Depp play Sweeney Todd in the previews has me hesitant. He seems to be playing a spaced out Edward Scissorhands-like character crossed with a standard horror movie villain, a completely different style from George Hearn's. Like, one of the lines from the end of the play that's in the commercials:
    Spoiler:

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  • Vrtra TheoryVrtra Theory Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    Saw it today, and for those who have seen it, I've got to mention one thing that was brilliant:
    Spoiler:

    This is the first time I've seen the story in any format, but I thoroughly enjoyed it. Depp, Bonham Carter and Rickman are all picture-perfect Burtonesque characters, too.

  • TehSpectreTehSpectre Ragamuffin Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    Blackjack wrote: »
    The Ballad of Sweeney Todd was left out because Johnny Depp's wife/son (I don't remember) got very ill and so he went home to be with his family, so they couldn't film it.

    Which is understandable, and I am sympathetic, but man. Two of the "ghosts" were being played by CHRISTOPHER LEE and ANTHONY STEWART HEAD.

    I swear to god I saw Head in one scene come and speak to Todd for a brief moment. He was in it for maybe 10 seconds and I kept expecting to see him again, but when I didn't...I doubted I had even seen him.

    Thank you for making me not feel crazy.

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  • kaliyamakaliyama Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    If you pay attention after the shaving contest Anthony Stewart Head is the man who approaches Sweeney for like 5 seconds and compliments him.

    It's funny that most people remember George Hearn when Len Cariou is the guy on the original recording. Sidenote: My mom knows both these people (Hearn moreso) and has bought drinks for both on several occasions.

    EDIT: I like the original show and the ballad a lot too but I think that having the ballad would be redundant when it's meant to explain things that can't be shown during the stage production that can be easily shown on film.

    It really didn't feel like anything was missing, which is good.

    Wasn't it George Hearn on the video recording?

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  • WyndhamPriceWyndhamPrice Registered User
    edited December 2007
    kaliyama wrote: »
    If you pay attention after the shaving contest Anthony Stewart Head is the man who approaches Sweeney for like 5 seconds and compliments him.

    It's funny that most people remember George Hearn when Len Cariou is the guy on the original recording. Sidenote: My mom knows both these people (Hearn moreso) and has bought drinks for both on several occasions.

    EDIT: I like the original show and the ballad a lot too but I think that having the ballad would be redundant when it's meant to explain things that can't be shown during the stage production that can be easily shown on film.

    It really didn't feel like anything was missing, which is good.

    Wasn't it George Hearn on the video recording?

    Yes it was but I was talking about the original cast record/CD.

    WyndhamPrice.png
  • ZeromusZeromus Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    Some random thoughts I'm pulling from an even more scattered post on my blog:

    I thought this film was absolutely fantastic, and from a "technical" standpoint (that is, in terms of camera work, scripting, visuals, etcetera), probably Tim Burton's finest movie. Now, a bit of a disclaimer here: I have not seen the Broadway play. I have seen it suggested by a critic or two that those who really love the Broadway play may find some fault with the movie. Looking at it purely from this perspective, I really think it is probably the first film of Tim Burton's that could legitimately be considered in the same arena of our current "master directors." I was really pleased to find that it seemed to lack his… egoism, for lack of a better word, that seems to pervade all of his other movies. Yeah, he cast his wife, and there was Johnny Depp, but other than that there weren’t too many things that were like “Oh yes, I have seen this in every other Burton movie ever made.” While that itself wouldn’t make it a better film than anything else, necessarily, that ties into what I would consider another one of the film’s strengths; it is subtle, yet viscerally pleasing, with depth, but not so much so that it seemed caught up in itself. The writing was good, suitable for a musical, I felt. It really seems to do a lot with a little. Very macabre and disturbing. I might even call it upsetting. The movie isn’t really very funny, which some critics seem to take issue with, given that apparently the play is a bit more focused on the humor, but then, others have said they've found it humorous enough. I'm all for dark humor, but even I was pretty much of the opinion that most of it was too grim to really be funny. That said, the tone is pretty consistent and it seemed fitting to me. And, of course, the whole thing is visually arresting.

    In any case, I really thought it was a solid film and probably one of the year's best.

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  • cj iwakuracj iwakura The Rhythm Rogue Coral Springs, FLRegistered User regular
    edited December 2007
    Saw it Christmas night.

    Depp & co. were excellent as expected, but in my opinion, the new faces stole the show, musically('Joanna', 'Perelli's Miracle Elixer').

    My favorite songs from the play were basically gone("More Hot Pies!"), but Joanna made up for it. Beautifully presented all-in-all.
    Spoiler:

    fiV9i14.jpg
    蒼く咲く華 日は灯り 天に流れる | Kill The Past
  • DocDoc Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited December 2007
    I saw it. It was great.
    Spoiler:

  • BlackjackBlackjack Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    cj iwakura wrote: »
    Saw it Christmas night.

    Depp & co. were excellent as expected, but in my opinion, the new faces stole the show, musically('Joanna', 'Perelli's Miracle Elixer').

    My favorite songs from the play were basically gone("More Hot Pies!"), but Joanna made up for it. Beautifully presented all-in-all.
    Spoiler:
    I loved the Joanna duet, and Pretty Women. Depp was definitely at his best, vocally, when duetting.

    I was sad that they trimmed A Little Priest, because it is my favorite song in the show and so I wished it had the full seven minutes, but I loved the presentation of it.

    And yes, the little kid playing Tobias was excellent. I was surprised.

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    3DS: 1607-3034-6970
  • DevoutlyApatheticDevoutlyApathetic I've Done Worse Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    This was nicely done.

    I may be unwell though, I just went and saw it then stopped to pick up some pot pie from the local store...

  • HakkekageHakkekage Space Whore Academy summa cum laudeRegistered User regular
    edited December 2007
    So I finally saw it D:

    It was awesome, and I didn't really mind all the song cuts because honestly, it was long enough even though 90% of the film was singing.

    Dear god all the blood

    3DS: 2165 - 6538 - 3417
  • Casual EddyCasual Eddy Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    Yeah the fantasy scenes in Down by the Sea were great! Those were the most burtonesque bits of the movie to me.

    The highschool production done at my school was very well done - the school had a great director and a beautiful theater. Everyone time a throat was slit the stage went red and a deafening screech was played. It was a nice change to see Depp slit throats with so little thought in the movie, one after another.

  • wwtMaskwwtMask Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    The kid was awesome and Sacha Baron Cohen was funny. Also, am I strange because Helena Bonham Carter is even more hot to me after seeing her in this role?

    When he dies, I hope they write "Worst Affirmative Action Hire, EVER" on his grave. His corpse should be trolled.
    Twitter - @liberaltruths | Google+ - http://gplus.to/wwtMask | Occupy Tallahassee
  • Ethan SmithEthan Smith Origin name: Beart4to Arlington, VARegistered User regular
    edited December 2007
    Yes, it is.

    I noted that the costume/makeup guys were great in this movie in the manner that they made nearly EVERY character completely unattractive. I'd still like to note that I would tap Joanna into next month, if given the chance, but besides that, there were wrinkles, bags under eyes, and just in general no-goodness.

    Little Priest was hilarious, Epiphany was an amazing song, I felt that they sang the songs too quickly, which made them impossible to memorize, but besides that...

    The desire to deprive some of our citizens of their rights—economic, civic or political—has the same basic motivation as actuates the Fascist mind when it seeks to dominate whole peoples and nations.
  • BlackjackBlackjack Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    Yes, it is.

    I noted that the costume/makeup guys were great in this movie in the manner that they made nearly EVERY character completely unattractive. I'd still like to note that I would tap Joanna into next month, if given the chance, but besides that, there were wrinkles, bags under eyes, and just in general no-goodness.

    Little Priest was hilarious, Epiphany was an amazing song, I felt that they sang the songs too quickly, which made them impossible to memorize, but besides that...
    A Little Priest lyrics (including the bits the cut)
    Spoiler:

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    3DS: 1607-3034-6970
  • DragDrag Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    Spoiler:

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Ethan SmithEthan Smith Origin name: Beart4to Arlington, VARegistered User regular
    edited December 2007
    Spoiler:
    Is the part I'll probably quote to my friend.
    And yeah, the burning was horrible.

    The desire to deprive some of our citizens of their rights—economic, civic or political—has the same basic motivation as actuates the Fascist mind when it seeks to dominate whole peoples and nations.
  • SentrySentry Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    I have to agree with the above posts...this film was excellent, and Burton, depp, Carter, and Rickman were so in their element when creating this... it is probably Burton's finest work.

    I keep wondering when he's going to hit his peak... then realize that, unless he makes a snuff film, he'll always just be reaching for that golden apple..

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    wrote:
    When I was a little kid, I always pretended I was the hero,' Skip said.
    'Fuck yeah, me too. What little kid ever pretended to be part of the lynch-mob?'
  • durandal4532durandal4532 Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    It's become apparent to me that what was needed to make me feel engaged during a musical was simply tons and tons of murder. And child abuse.

    That was a really fun movie.

  • SentrySentry Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    wwtMask wrote: »
    The kid was awesome and Sacha Baron Cohen was funny. Also, am I strange because Helena Bonham Carter is even more hot to me after seeing her in this role?

    If you are, we need to form a club.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    wrote:
    When I was a little kid, I always pretended I was the hero,' Skip said.
    'Fuck yeah, me too. What little kid ever pretended to be part of the lynch-mob?'
  • DocDoc Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited December 2007
    It's become apparent to me that what was needed to make me feel engaged during a musical was simply tons and tons of murder. And child abuse.

    That was a really fun movie.

    Yeah, when Cohen slaps the kid me and like three other people in the theater laughed.

  • TarranonTarranon Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    Never saw the play, saw this tonight. A very fun gothy romp. The acting was solid all around, but I felt like the movie lost its footing whenever the judge, lovett, or todd weren't on screen. The other characters were fairly boring. It's not like that was often the case though.

  • QuidQuid The Fifth Horseman Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    Colleen and I saw it and loved it. Lovett's beach song was my favorite.

    Be glad you weren't the only one in the theatre Doc.

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