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Alcohol Thread

ThanatosThanatos Registered User regular
edited August 2007 in Ancient Forum Knowledge
Whether you're alone or together with family for the holidays, it's a great time to drink. Let's be honest, though: any time is a great time to drink.

So, given that we've had a few threads asking questions about alcohol in general, that there's a forumer who recently turned 21 who keeps tapping me for my extensive knowledge in the area of imbibing, and that the old alcohol thread got pushed off the board instead of going into the archive (probably pheezer's doing, but possibly bone daddy's; it's been awhile), I figure it's time for another one. So, without further ado, the alcohol thread (let's try to avoid beer, since that would pretty much be a thread on its own):

Types of alcohol: general categories include wines, beers, alco-pops, hard liquor, cocktails, and liqueur.

Beer is a drink made with hops, barley, and usually wheat. It's high in carbohydrates, and generally ranges anywhere from 8 to 30 proof (2 proof is one percent alcohol, so something that's 15 proof is 7.5% alcohol). 12 ounces of beer is generally considered "one drink.*" This is the one we won't be talking about.

Wine is a drink made by fermenting grapes, occasionally mixed with other fruits, but not usually. Wine grapes are generally small and bitter, not like the kind of grapes you get at a grocery store. Regions which are known for producing good wine include California, France, Australia, and Chile. Wines generally range from 12 to 30 proof, most hovering around 18 or so. Wine is to be drunk out of wine glasses (the wider, shorter red wine glasses for red wine, and the narrower taller white wine glasses for white wine). Ten ounces of wine is considered "one drink." Champagne is a sub-category of white whine, that is carbonated. Champagne not made in Champagne, France, or a small vineyard in California owned by a group of French growers from Champagne, is known as "sparkling wine." Chemically, there's no significant difference between champagne and sparkling wine.

Alco-pops are increasingly popular amongst younger drinkers (especially underage drinkers), and generally more popular amongst females than males. They tend not to taste very alcoholic, because they usually aren't very alcoholic, tending to be from 5 to 20 proof (yes, I've seen 5 proof alco-pops). This category includes things like "Smirnoff Twists," "Mike's Hard Lemonade," wine coolers, and most fruity, fizzy alcoholic drinks. A single bottle or can (usually 12 oz.) of alco-pop is generally considered "one drink."

Hard liquor are drinks which are usually distilled (made via evaporation, post-fermentation), and include things like vodka, gin, rum, and tequila. They are generally classified by a rough, clearly alcoholic taste, and usually drank in shot glasses. Hard liquor mostly tends to be around 80 proof, but with some of the grain alcohols can get as high as 190 proof (everclear). Of course, Bacardi 151 is 151 proof. 1.5 oz of hard liquor is usually considered "one drink," but if it's something like 151 or Everclear, 1.5 oz should be considered two drinks.

Cocktails are drinks made by mixing alcoholic drinks with other things. The alcohol content varies wildly, even amongst the same type of cocktail, depending on how strongly the drink is made.

Liqueurs are similar to hard liquor, in that they have a high alcohol content, but instead of the rough alcohol flavor, generally have a much sweeter, fruitier flavor. What determines "one drink" varies depending on what the alcohol content of the particular liqueur is.

This'll be my general "intro to alcohol" post. I'll get into specific alcohols in the next post.

*For those of you wondering where I'm getting my numbers for what is considered "one drink," it's what I remember from my freshman health orientation presentation, and/or my driver's ed class in high school. In most states, for most people, two drinks is enough to make you legally drunk for purposes of driving. Generally, your body burns off one drink worth of drunkenness per hour. And a quick, helpful FYI for those of you who like to drink at parties: those red plastic Solo cups? Around 20 ounces, or a little more than one and a half drinks (assuming you're drinking beer). Something good to keep in mind.

Thanatos on
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Posts

  • ThanatosThanatos Registered User regular
    edited December 2005
    Quality alcohols:

    Wine:
    Jacob's Creek: Australian. Pretty well-known as a very good budget wine. Award-winning Chardonnay, generally goes for around $8 per bottle.

    Charles Shaw: Californian. Affectionately known as "Two-Buck Chuck," due to the fact that it is sold at Trader Joe's for two dollars a bottle. Given the price, it is excellent wine.

    Fetzer: Californian. Slightly more expensive, quality wine. Especially the Zinfandel, and especially deep red variety of wine, a specialty of Mendocino County.

    Hard Liquor

    Gins:

    Beefeater's: decent gin, for the price. Pretty cheap, good for mixing.

    Bombay Sapphire: more expensive than Beefeater's, known for it's distinctive blue bottle. Quality gin, especially once you're into drinking, and looking for a good mid-range gin.

    Tanqueray: similarly-priced to Bombay Sapphire, and similar in quality, as well.

    Tanqueray Ten: a pretty expensive sipping gin. Generally shouldn't be used as a mixer, but drunk straight.

    Vodkas:

    Vladimir, Albertson's, etc. (pretty much anything in a plastic bottle): the best use for these sorts of vodkas is washing floors or disinfecting wounds. If you must drink them, mix them into a cocktail of some sort, preferably one that doesn't use a lot of vodka.

    Smirnoff: a small step above those in the plastic bottle. Generally, a shitty value, since you can get much better vodkas for not much more money.

    Absolut, Vox: sort of off on its own, these vodkas have a smooth, somewhat "un-vodka" taste. The Vox, especially, goes down very easily.

    Frïs: my vodka of choice. A little more expensive than Smirnoff, but much, much tastier. This vodka is, IMO, the best value for your money. Cheap enough to mix, but tastes more than good enough to drink straight.

    Grey Goose, Belvedere, Level: high-quality, very expensive, very good vodkas. They taste very good, but you're paying for what you're getting.

  • JohnnyCacheJohnnyCache Starting Defense Registered User regular
    edited December 2005
    While distillation is any seperation by evaporation, in the world of spirits, evaporation is a step beyond fermentation, not a replacement for it. You ferment, then you distill.

    "Maybe we're here to eat the sandwich." -- Joe Rogan
  • Minnie2Minnie2 Registered User
    edited December 2005
    I've found that a good starter drink is UV-Blue Raspberry Vodka mixed with lemonade. It tastes great, but can get you really drunk if you're not keeping tabs. Also, shots of UV are much easier than shots of straight vodka, because they have a lower alcohol content.

    For some people (read some Irish/German ancestry) like me, it takes longer to metabolize the alcohol than for other people. So, even though you're not as drunk as your friend now, you could be quite smashed in half an hour or so.

    There are some ancestries of people (I can't remember which) that lack an alcohol degrading enzyme, or have a messed up form. This could lead to a delay in drunkenness.

  • InsanityIncInsanityInc Registered User
    edited December 2005
    I noticed a bit of an oddity. A beer is generally considered one drink, because although it contains more alcohol than a 1oz, 80proof shot, it also comes along with other matter which slows the absorption rate.

    A shot is supposed to be 30ml or 1oz. 30ml of 80proof liquor is considered "One Drink" in the shot world. i.e. basically every vodka ever.

    Beyond that, allow me to go into some of my experiences with liquor:

    Vodka:

    Staple stuff. Ranges from "rubbing alcohol" to "completely tasteless". Good vodka tastes like water that's been sitting around for a while. Distilled from potatoes!

    For brands, here's some I have experience with:

    Popov: The cheapest liquor i've ever seen. It's like 7 bucks/1.75ml. Also one of the most disgusting liquors I've ever had. Tastes like you're shooting rubbing alcohol. 80 proof.

    Smirnoff: Pretty cheap. Slightly less gross than popov. 80 proof.

    ICE vodka: Cheaper than smirnoff, seems like it might have some sugar added. Tastes a lot better than smirnoff. 80 proof

    Stolichnaya: Pretty genuine stuff. Tastes like funny water. No real alcohol taste at all. Very easy to drink. Reasonably expensive, at about ~20 bucks for a 750ml bottle. 80 proof.

    Grey Goose: Overpriced crap. It's like 35 bucks for a 750ml bottle and it tastes barely better than smirnoff. Stolichnaya is way better. 80 proof.

    Most of these brands also offer flavored varieties. All the flavored ones smell strongly of what they're supposed to taste like, but don't really taste like it, and in the case of smirnoff it doesn't mask the horrid taste at all.

    Whiskey/Whisky

    There are a number of types of whiskey, before I get into brands I'll explain them:

    1) Single Malt Scotch whiskey: Made entirely of malted barley, must be aged, only made in scotland. Irish Whiskey is similar to scotch, but not actually scotch, as it's not from scotland.
    2) "Blended" Scotch Whiskey: Some blend of single malts and (sometimes)grain whiskey. They usually don't tell you how much of what they use. In general, they tend to have way more grain whiskey than scotch.
    3) Grain Whisky: Generally American. Also known as "Sour Mash" whisky. Basically they just brew a bunch of random things and distill it.
    4) Bourbon Whisky: Grain Whisky that must consist of a high percentage of corn. Usually made in Kentucky, but can be made elsewhere. Also generally flavored.

    Factoid: In america, it's spelled "Whisky". Everywhere else it's "Whiskey".

    Brands:

    Seagrams 7 (Grain Whiskey): It comes in a plastic bottle. It also tastes like the ass of lucifer. 80 proof.

    Jack Daniels (Grain Whiskey): Almost as bad as seagrams, but about 4x the price. 80 proof.

    Johnnie Walker Red (Blended Scotch Whiskey): About the same as Jack Daniels, in taste and price. My bet is that it has very little scotch. 80 proof.

    Johnnie Walker Black (Blended Scotch Whiskey): Tates a bit better than the red, also more expensive. It may have more scotch in it, but it's also aged 12 years. 80 proof.

    Wild Turkey (Kentucky Bourbon): Pretty tasty. Tastes extremely different from the grain whiskey I've tried. Also pretty expensive. 100 proof.

    Generally, the longer any whiskey is aged, the better it tastes.
    Also, Southern Comfort is not actually Bourbon, though it is commonly mistaken for it.

    Rum

    Often flavored or "spiced", there are a number of rum brands, and they are all distilled from sugar cane. For being distilled from sugar cane, it actually tastes a hellova lot worse than you figure it would.

    Malibu Coconut Rum: The original flavored rum. Tastes quite good, and unsurprisingly like coconut. Smells like suntan lotion. 40 proof.

    Parrot Bay Pineapple Rum: Captain Morgan brand. Tastes pretty bad, because the flavor doesn't mask the alcohol. Smells great, though. 40 proof.

    Captain Morgan Spiced Rum: Awful. Tastes like wet newspaper and cinnamon. 80 proof.

    Bacardi Rum: Awful. Tastes similar to Captain Morgan. 80 proof.

    Bacardi 151: Extremely flammable. Also extremely horrible. Though, I think it tastes better than normal bacardi simply because it has less rum in it! Only good for starting fires or getting drunk really fast. 151 proof.

    Meyer's Dark Rum: Decent, but the taste builds up in your mouth and gets gross after a while of drinking it. I hear it makes a good mixer with citrus juices. 80 proof.

    Gin

    Distilled from a variety of things, but mainly from juniper berries.

    Bombay Sapphire: Good, but very hard to drink straight. It doesn't burn so much as take your breath away after you taste it for a second. Tastes sort of like a christmas tree smells. 90 proof.

    Tanqueray: Tastes about the same as bombay, but it tastes less stiff. 90 proof.

    Tanqueray #10: High end tanqueray. Tastes a bit better and isn't very stiff at all. 100 proof.

    Anise Liquers

    I'll separate these from the normal flavored ones as there are a lot of them.

    These are flavored with a plant called "Anise". It tastes extremely similar to black licorice, and the resulting liquers do as well.

    Ouzo: Tastes OK. Pretty rough taken straight though. You're supposed to mix it with water and it turns white. Don't freeze it or some stuff separates out of it and it tastes much worse. All brands taste pretty much the same to me. 80 proof.

    Jagermeister: A personal favorite of mine. Proportedly not actually flavored with Anise, but it tastes close enough so I'll put it here. Tastes like spicy black licorice. Very easy to drink straight, but must be served chilled. 70 proof.

    Sambuca: Really varies by brand. Generally tastes as good or better than Ouzo. Usually 80-90 proof.

    Flavored Liquers

    Flavored with all assortments of stuff Usually fruit.

    Grand Marnier: Orange flavored. Pronounced "Gran Monyay". Pretty good, usually served warm. 80 proof.

    Peach Schnapps: Semi-ok. Tastes like peaches that went a little funky. 60 proof.

    Peppermint Schnapps: Burns like a motherfucker. VERY pepperminty. 60 or 100 proof.

    Dissarano Amaretto: It's ok. Tastes very amaretto-y, but also has a pretty strong alcohol taste. 35 proof.

    That's all I can remember drinking for now. I'll probably update this later.

    Martman wrote:
    Poldy wrote:
    Would you be pissed if your children did not love you, because they thought they were the ones being rational?
    Not if I hid from my children and beat them occasionally.
  • JohnnyCacheJohnnyCache Starting Defense Registered User regular
    edited December 2005
    Glacier Potato Vodka is really good and not too expensive, but it's a little hard to find around the country.

    Just as a note - Grey Goose and the like aren't really that expensive. Unless you are an honest to god drunk, liquor for drinking straight should cost 25-35 bucks a bottle.

    As far a mixers, I find Castillo rums to be a great well alternative to the Captain Morgan family and Malibu makes good, cheap fruit flavored rums for your umbrella drinks.

    A coffee liquor is a must have for a well stocked bar - the name brand is, of course, Kahluha, but Kimora is half as expensive and tastes about the same with cream or milk and vodka.


    A great gin for gin and tonic is Seagram's Lime Gin - and it's cheap as shit, too. Like, wino cheap.

    EDIT: WHISKEY is made in Ireland or America. Whisky is made elswhere. There are exceptions to this general rule - companies that presuppose to use the processes of the nations with the other spellings. They are not quite the same product - it's not a simple armor/armour issue.

    "Maybe we're here to eat the sandwich." -- Joe Rogan
  • ThanatosThanatos Registered User regular
    edited December 2005
    Just as a note - Grey Goose and the like aren't really that expensive. Unless you are an honest to god drunk, liquor for drinking straight should cost 25-35 bucks a bottle.
    Grey Goose costs about twice as much as something like Frïs at most of the places I've seen. Like, I can get a 1.5 of Frïs for the price of a 750 of Grey Goose.
    A great gin for gin and tonic is Seagram's Lime Gin - and it's cheap as shit, too. Like, wino cheap.
    Y'know, I've never had anything bad that has a Seagram's label on it, alcoholic or not. Quality, workhorse liquor, in general. Very affordable, very drinkable. Even their non-alcoholic stuff is excellent (my favorite ginger ale). They also own the company that produces one of my favorite liqueurs.

  • PodlyPodly good moleman to youRegistered User regular
    edited December 2005
    I find Grand Marnier strangely addictive.

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  • JohnnyCacheJohnnyCache Starting Defense Registered User regular
    edited December 2005
    Thanatos wrote:
    Just as a note - Grey Goose and the like aren't really that expensive. Unless you are an honest to god drunk, liquor for drinking straight should cost 25-35 bucks a bottle.
    Grey Goose costs about twice as much as something like Frïs at most of the places I've seen. Like, I can get a 1.5 of Frïs for the price of a 750 of Grey Goose.

    Maybe you're lucky in terms of geography or something - here they are about the same. How much does grey goose cost there? Here they are both about 27.

    "Maybe we're here to eat the sandwich." -- Joe Rogan
  • ThanatosThanatos Registered User regular
    edited December 2005
    Thanatos wrote:
    Just as a note - Grey Goose and the like aren't really that expensive. Unless you are an honest to god drunk, liquor for drinking straight should cost 25-35 bucks a bottle.
    Grey Goose costs about twice as much as something like Frïs at most of the places I've seen. Like, I can get a 1.5 of Frïs for the price of a 750 of Grey Goose.
    Maybe you're lucky in terms of geography or something - here they are about the same. How much does grey goose cost there? Here they are both about 27.
    Grey Goose generally runs about $25-30 for 750ml, Frïs about $30 for a 1.5l. It was similar in NY, when I went to school there, though slightly cheaper for both.

  • JohnnyCacheJohnnyCache Starting Defense Registered User regular
    edited December 2005
    25-30 for a 750? WOW. I can get a 1.5 for between 20 and 30.

    "Maybe we're here to eat the sandwich." -- Joe Rogan
  • ThanatosThanatos Registered User regular
    edited December 2005
    25-30 for a 750? WOW. I can get a 1.5 for between 20 and 30.
    Of Grey Goose? Are you sure? :shock:

    What the hell do you pay for Smirnoff?

  • JohnnyCacheJohnnyCache Starting Defense Registered User regular
    edited December 2005
    Thanatos wrote:
    25-30 for a 750? WOW. I can get a 1.5 for between 20 and 30.
    Of Grey Goose? Are you sure? :shock:

    What the hell do you pay for Smirnoff?

    I'll double check. One of those big beveled glass fifths of Vox is like, 35, too. :P

    "Maybe we're here to eat the sandwich." -- Joe Rogan
  • ThanatosThanatos Registered User regular
    edited December 2005
    Thanatos wrote:
    25-30 for a 750? WOW. I can get a 1.5 for between 20 and 30.
    Of Grey Goose? Are you sure? :shock:

    What the hell do you pay for Smirnoff?
    I'll double check. One of those big beveled glass fifths of Vox is like, 35, too. :P
    Heh, I had a friend get me one of those on sale for like $25 once. Vox is good, but I'm not a big fan; it's just too smooth for me. But the bottle is awesome.

  • japanjapan Registered User regular
    edited December 2005
    Whiskey/Whisky

    There are a number of types of whiskey, before I get into brands I'll explain them:

    1) Single Malt Scotch whiskey: Made entirely of malted barley, must be aged, only made in scotland/ireland.
    2) "Blended" Scotch Whiskey: Some blend of single malts and grain whiskey. They usually don't tell you how much of what they use. In general, they tend to have way more grain whiskey than scotch.

    I just wanted to add a couple of points to this. Scotch is made in Scotland. If it's made in Ireland, it's not a Scotch, it's an Irish. It particularly drives the Irish nuts when Irish whisky is called Scotch. It annoys most Scots, too, though not to quite the same extent.

    Additionally, not all blended whisky is bad, and not all contains grain whisky. There are some very good blends out there, like Teachers, Dewars, The Famous Grouse Reserves and Chivas Regal. There are also good blends for people who drink their whisky with ice or soda, like Grants or The Famous Grouse. Personally, I've always found Johnnie Walker very bland.

    My picks for affordable single malts would be:
    Laphroaig: an Island malt, has a serious punch behind it. Peaty charcoally and oily. Smells like seaweed. Only go for this if you already know you like whisky. The 10 year old can be had for a reasonable price, I've never tried the special bottlings.

    Tobermory: another Island malt (spot the pattern :wink: ) this time from Mull. Much less of the peaty punch that's expected from the Islands. Light in colour and nose, smooth in flavour. Good intro to Islands.

    The Glenlivet: Speyside. If you don't like The Glenlivet, you don't like Scotch. It's that simple.

  • JohnnyCacheJohnnyCache Starting Defense Registered User regular
    edited December 2005
    I'm a big fan of Laphroaig. It is fun to spell, fun to pronounce, and fun to drink!

    "Maybe we're here to eat the sandwich." -- Joe Rogan
  • InsanityIncInsanityInc Registered User
    edited December 2005
    japan wrote:
    Whiskey/Whisky

    There are a number of types of whiskey, before I get into brands I'll explain them:

    1) Single Malt Scotch whiskey: Made entirely of malted barley, must be aged, only made in scotland/ireland.
    2) "Blended" Scotch Whiskey: Some blend of single malts and grain whiskey. They usually don't tell you how much of what they use. In general, they tend to have way more grain whiskey than scotch.

    I just wanted to add a couple of points to this. Scotch is made in Scotland. If it's made in Ireland, it's not a Scotch, it's an Irish. It particularly drives the Irish nuts when Irish whisky is called Scotch. It annoys most Scots, too, though not to quite the same extent.

    Additionally, not all blended whisky is bad, and not all contains grain whisky. There are some very good blends out there, like Teachers, Dewars, The Famous Grouse Reserves and Chivas Regal. There are also good blends for people who drink their whisky with ice or soda, like Grants or The Famous Grouse. Personally, I've always found Johnnie Walker very bland.

    Fixed in my post.

    Martman wrote:
    Poldy wrote:
    Would you be pissed if your children did not love you, because they thought they were the ones being rational?
    Not if I hid from my children and beat them occasionally.
  • PheezerPheezer Registered User, ClubPA
    edited December 2005
    The gin remarks are highly lacking.


    Regular Tanqueray has a pine taste to it because it just uses juniper for a botanical.

    Bombay Sapphire has a much more balanced, even taste to it because it uses a number of botanicals, 10 in fact. It is therefore less like the gin that was drank in the olden days, but is generally considered to be vastly superior.

    Fun tip: the botanicals in Bombay Sapphire cover every corner of the British Empire during it's height. Gin was the key to the expansion of the British empire, as it made tonic water palatable. Tonic water contained quinine, which prevented Malaria. Modern tonic water has far less quinine in it and even often has sugar added. Real tonic water was horribly bitter and medicinal tasting.

    In the high end category, you have a few options. Tanqueray #10 is alright, but again, not that great.

    My personal pick for a high end gin is Mercury. It comes in the coolest bottle of the bunch, and has an almost orange flavor to it. By far the smoothest of the bunch, easily drank straight although it makes one hell of a gin and tonic.

    Magellan is also a great choice, and unlike Bombay Sapphire, which comes in a blue bottle, Magellan is actually a blue liquid that comes in a clear bottle. Really neat stuff.


    At the low end you have Gilbey's London Dry Gin, which is terrible. Really terrible. Even worse is Beefeater. That shit is only gin by the most technical definition. Also wretched is this lemon gin shit you can sometimes get which is 23% alcohol and lemon flavoured. Not even worth considering.



    Missing from the vodka section is Canada's Polar Ice Vodka, a premium that tends to be hard to get outside of Canada. I suppose you could also mention Absolut (absolutely shit), which is about the same price and just slightly less good than Smirnoff.

    IT'S GOT ME REACHING IN MY POCKET IT'S GOT ME FORKING OVER CASH
    CUZ THERE'S SOMETHING IN THE MIDDLE AND IT'S GIVING ME A RASH
  • JohnnyCacheJohnnyCache Starting Defense Registered User regular
    edited December 2005
    Just to re-iterate: It is not by accident or oversight that Absolut is not making everyone's list. Absolut is the most over-rated thing there is.

    "Maybe we're here to eat the sandwich." -- Joe Rogan
  • PheezerPheezer Registered User, ClubPA
    edited December 2005
    Just to re-iterate: It is not by accident or oversight that Absolut is not making everyone's list. Absolut is the most over-rated thing there is.

    Yes, but it looks fancy and if you don't specifically point out that it's worthless, some poor sap will waste their money on it.

    Potter's Vodka on the other hand is obviously shit and legitimately doesn't need to be mentioned because no one would ever buy it assuming that it was anything but the worst possible vodka they could buy.

    IT'S GOT ME REACHING IN MY POCKET IT'S GOT ME FORKING OVER CASH
    CUZ THERE'S SOMETHING IN THE MIDDLE AND IT'S GIVING ME A RASH
  • MegaMan001MegaMan001 CRNA Rochester, MNRegistered User regular
    edited December 2005
    I drink Smirnoff. I'm in college and I am poor, but I'd like to think that I am quite personal terms with the comrade.

    I am in the business of saving lives.

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  • PheezerPheezer Registered User, ClubPA
    edited December 2005
    MegaMan001 wrote:
    I drink Smirnoff. I'm in college and I am poor, but I'd like to think that I am quite personal terms with the comrade.

    As long as you're not convinced that it's "good".

    IT'S GOT ME REACHING IN MY POCKET IT'S GOT ME FORKING OVER CASH
    CUZ THERE'S SOMETHING IN THE MIDDLE AND IT'S GIVING ME A RASH
  • QuelrethQuelreth Registered User
    edited December 2005
    pheezer FD wrote:
    Just to re-iterate: It is not by accident or oversight that Absolut is not making everyone's list. Absolut is the most over-rated thing there is.

    Yes, but it looks fancy and if you don't specifically point out that it's worthless, some poor sap will waste their money on it.

    A girl over at my apartment once told me her favorite vodka was Absolut, and she thought Grey Goose was highly overrated. I almost told her to get out.

    I'm a huge bourbon fan, but I haven't been able to experiment a whole lot.

    Wild Turkey is probably the lowest you should go. I've only had the 101 proof variety, and while it was drinkable, I wasn't enjoying it. You should probably have coke on hand.

    Jim Beam is, surprisingly, a pretty good bourbon, and for the price it's amazing. Also sold some places in handy 375ml flasks for incognito boozing.

    Wild Turkey Rare Breed is very expensive and something like 54% alcohol, but it's great. If you've got the money to burn, this is a damn good bourbon.

  • MidshipmanMidshipman Registered User regular
    edited December 2005
    A shot is supposed to be 30ml or 1oz. 30ml of 80proof liquor is considered "One Drink" in the shot world. i.e. basically every vodka ever..

    I can't believe that this has gone unnoticed so far. A shot is 1.5 ounces, not 1. A pony shot is 1 ounce.

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  • ComahawkComahawk Registered User regular
    edited December 2005
    Absinth

    Of the readily available sort in Canada:

    Hill's - Tastes like shit but generally works. The effect is slightly noticable, but it takes a fair amount to notice it (took me around 4 shots).

    Green Tree Distillery - No effect, I quesetion if there is any wormwood in this brand. Tastes really good though, Anise flavor (like real absinth should) with no bitter aftertaste, nice and sweet.

    Czech Strong - Finally got some from southern Alberta, last night I poured myself a glass and drank it, felt something, so I had a second. This stuff kicked my ass, probably the closest you will find to the 'real' effect. You won't see anything but it does feel more like you are high than drunk. Maybe with high doses you will hallucinate, I didn't ahve the time to do that last night. Taste wise, it has the proper Anise flavour, with a bitter after taste. Worth the money though.

    I drink all my absinthe the french way, dissolve sugar with water and add to 1 oz of absinth. Though I have gotten sloppy lately and just throw about 3/4tsp sugar in with the shot, fill the rest of the glass with water and stir until dissolved. Works just as well, less showy though.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Al_watAl_wat Registered User regular
    edited December 2005
    What kinda prices you find for Absinthe in Canada?

    edit: Damn, new page.

  • ComahawkComahawk Registered User regular
    edited December 2005
    Al_wat wrote:
    What kinda prices you find for Absinthe in Canada?

    edit: Damn, new page.

    Depends on the store, for a 26, anywhere from $50-$65

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • JohnnyCacheJohnnyCache Starting Defense Registered User regular
    edited December 2005
    Let's not have the absinthe conversation again for those considering ah...'hating' on it...

    "Maybe we're here to eat the sandwich." -- Joe Rogan
  • tmccooltmccool Registered User
    edited December 2005
    There should be a post on how to drink Guinness the proper way. I've heard people are very particular about it, and since I'm taking a trip to the UK this summer, I should learn about that, right?

    Also, an important question: how do I drink with my family (during this vacation, since I'll be of legal age) without embarassing them or myself, but having a good time doing it?

  • ComahawkComahawk Registered User regular
    edited December 2005
    tmccool wrote:
    There should be a post on how to drink Guinness the proper way. I've heard people are very particular about it, and since I'm taking a trip to the UK this summer, I should learn about that, right?

    Also, an important question: how do I drink with my family (during this vacation, since I'll be of legal age) without embarassing them or myself, but having a good time doing it?

    Short answer: You don't

    Long answer: If your parents are that unaccepting of you drinking, it would not be a reasonably thing to do around them just because you are legal. If you must drink, don't go to excess. Have no more than 3 drinks (3 oz of booze, 3 beers) in a three hour period, you should stay reasonably sober unless you are uber-cheap.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Salvation122Salvation122 Registered User regular
    edited December 2005
    General rule: If it comes in a plastic bottle, fucking avoid it. It will taste, to some extent, like plastic. I use Bacardi for mixing, and I buy the litres, simply because I can't stand plastic-bottled alcohol.

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  • MidshipmanMidshipman Registered User regular
    edited December 2005
    Once again for the record, a drink of 80 proof alcohol is 1.5 ounces, not 1.

    12 ounces of regular beer (5% alcohol) equals 5 ounces of table wine (12% alcohol) equals 1.5 ounces of hard liquor (40% alcohol). One drink has 17.7 mL of pure alcohol in it. You can check the math yourself.

    Edit: Here is a large beer discussion that occurred a while ago in D&D.
    D&D Beer Collective

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  • BarrakkethBarrakketh Registered User regular
    edited December 2005
    Any recommendations as to a good doppelbock that isn't a royal PITA to find in the US? Preferrably non-seasonal.

  • The CatThe Cat Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited December 2005
    General rule: If it comes in a plastic bottle, fucking avoid it. It will taste, to some extent, like plastic. I use Bacardi for mixing, and I buy the litres, simply because I can't stand plastic-bottled alcohol.

    I have honestly never seen alcohol in a plastic bottle. That's just wrong. Damn americans mess up everything...

    Pro-tip for Aussie beer in the US: Don't drink fucking Fosters. Just don't. You people are the only thing preventing them from going out of business. 'Australian for Beer', my ass. Stick to Boags or Cascade, they're pretty good. VB or XXXX if you're trailer trash or a student :P

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  • MidshipmanMidshipman Registered User regular
    edited December 2005
    The Cat wrote:
    I have honestly never seen alcohol in a plastic bottle. That's just wrong. Damn americans mess up everything...

    If you think that is wrong, try watching television adds that try and tell you how great it is that Coors Light now comes in plastic bottles. So very sad.

    In case you don't know, Coors Light is already one of the worst American beers.

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  • PheezerPheezer Registered User, ClubPA
    edited December 2005
    Midshipman wrote:
    The Cat wrote:
    I have honestly never seen alcohol in a plastic bottle. That's just wrong. Damn americans mess up everything...

    If you think that is wrong, try watching television adds that try and tell you how great it is that Coors Light now comes in plastic bottles. So very sad.

    In case you don't know, Coors Light is already one of the worst American beers.

    In Canada if you buy bottles larger than a 40 oz. (66 oz? I don't remember) you get a plastic bottle. Every brand I've seen. Weird stuff.

    IT'S GOT ME REACHING IN MY POCKET IT'S GOT ME FORKING OVER CASH
    CUZ THERE'S SOMETHING IN THE MIDDLE AND IT'S GIVING ME A RASH
  • Sir CarcassSir Carcass I have been shown the end of my world Austin, TXRegistered User regular
    edited December 2005
    Foster's is fine if you like lighter beers, which I do. Coors Light is actually my favorite beer. Really, I could give a shit if what I enjoy is considered "good" or "bad".

    Here's a list of what I usually drink:

    Wild Turkey 101
    I love bourbon, and Wild Turkey is my favorite. I haven't tried Rare Breed yet, though I will eventually. The regular stuff is good enough for me. Straight or mixed with Coke, it's good stuff.

    Crown Royal
    Good Canadian whiskey. I generally get this with Coke.

    Captain Morgan's Private Stock
    I have to be in the mood for rum, but when I am, this is what I like. Good stuff.

    The Glenlivet
    I'm still a Scotch noob (Glenlivet being all I've tried so far), but it's not bad. I like to have a glass of this when I go out to one of the more upscale bars around here.

    As far as wines, I personally prefer dry reds. I'm still somewhat new to wine, not really being able to tell one brand from another, but I really enjoy Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Noir (OMG SIDEWAYS), and Merlot. As far as brands, I generally just pick something around $8 a bottle in the store or $6 a glass in a restaurant. Cavit and Camelot have been good to me so far. Definitely a must with Italian food.

    Another drink I like is an Amaretto Sour. Certainly not one to get drunk of off, but very tasty. I can only usually drink one, though, because it's a pretty syrupy drink. Makes a good after-dinner drink.

    A good after-dinner drink is Bailey's Irish Creme and coffee (though it's good straight, too).

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  • MidshipmanMidshipman Registered User regular
    edited December 2005
    Foster's is fine if you like lighter beers, which I do. Coors Light is actually my favorite beer.

    Either your tongue is broken or you don't have much experience with good beer.

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  • Sir CarcassSir Carcass I have been shown the end of my world Austin, TXRegistered User regular
    edited December 2005
    Midshipman wrote:
    Foster's is fine if you like lighter beers, which I do. Coors Light is actually my favorite beer.

    Either your tongue is broken or you don't have much experience with good beer.

    Or, how bout, I actually like what I like and not what beer snobs tell me I should like.

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  • BarrakkethBarrakketh Registered User regular
    edited December 2005
    Midshipman wrote:
    Foster's is fine if you like lighter beers, which I do. Coors Light is actually my favorite beer.

    Either your tongue is broken or you don't have much experience with good beer.

    Or, how bout, I actually like what I like and not what beer snobs tell me I should like.
    It doesn't take a beer snob to recognize shitty beer. I'm fairly sure American beer (sans the stuff from most micro-breweries) is the closest you'll get to tasting piss without being into watersports.

  • sixekkosixekko Registered User
    edited December 2005
    I turned 21 a couple weeks ago and have been looking for some Alcohol that has a good taste and wont leave my wallet crying. I've tried Bacardi Rum with coke but that made me want to puke. So if some one could help this drinking newbie I would be thankful.

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