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What's your definition of "Gamer?"

2

Posts

  • LigerLiger Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Neva wrote: »
    Really, I don't know what the OP was hoping for, but I'm pretty sure she's going to end up disappointed.

    I was hoping for any kind of response. This is perfect, guys, please keep going!

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  • PikaPuffPikaPuff Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Great. Let's stop answering the question and instead discuss what the question means. On a molecular level. For what a gamer is, I agree with Keith. If you're actively playing video games, you're a gamer. If you're actively riding a bike, you're a cyclist. If you stop playing games for a long while, you're not a gamer at that moment.

    If you want to change the question to be about the "gamer as a sub-culture," go ahead. But that won't make keith's definition of what a gamer is in general incorrect.

  • KeithKeith Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    If some kid does pushups, pull-ups, and runs all day, and wears boots and fatigues, that doesn't make him a Marine. Being part of that culture requires more than just going through the motions.

    That's completely different.

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  • BlueDestinyBlueDestiny Registered User
    edited February 2008
    Keith wrote: »
    Keith wrote: »
    midgetspy wrote: »
    A gamer is somebody who plays video games as a hobby. Somebody who spends a decent chunk of their spare time playing video games.

    I ride my bike sometimes and I'm not a cyclist.

    Yes you are. You're not professional or competitive, but you're still a cyclist.

    Dude...really? Only in the strictest sense of the word. In common usage, saying that someone is a "cyclist" implies a greater level of commitment than the average person to ride a bike in whatever context. They take biking seriously. Now apply that to gaming.

    See, you think the term has to accurately describe their entire being.

    When I was younger, I rode a bike everywhere. I didn't "take biking seriously". I didn't care about different bicycle types or tires or crap. I was still a cyclist.

    You're trying to find a label instead of a term.

    Gaming is a sub-culture, and sub-cultures are defined by those who are in them and embrace them. If the gaming sub-culture ("Gamers") decide what it takes to be a "gamer", then they are correct. Just because a 10 year old who plays Mario Sunshine says he's a gamer, does not make him one. Just as anybody who plays a video game does not automatically get their intitiation card into the gamer subculture.

    Little kids who ride their bikes around the neighborhood can call themselves cyclists, and you make think they are. But people who are in the cycling sub-culture are the ones who define what a "cyclist" is. And since you've already said you are anti-gaming sub-culture, I don't see how you're even qualified to be saying who is a gamer and who isn't.

    The OP asked us to define what a Gamer, and as members of the sub-culture, that's exactly what we're doing.

    Wrong wrong wrong. Gaming is an activity with a subculture, like most activities that have a large following.

    If some kid does pushups, pull-ups, and runs all day, and wears boots and fatigues, that doesn't make him a Marine. Being part of that culture requires more than just going through the motions.

    Because Marines do P.T. all day. Right.

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  • EvangirEvangir Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    People who occasionally play video games, but consider it a low priority hobby are called casual gamers.
    People who frequently play video games, and consider it a high priority hobby are called hardcore gamers.

    It really shouldn't be any more complicated than that.

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  • acidlacedpenguinacidlacedpenguin Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    did someone say weeaboos?


    seriously though, to me a gamer is anyone who can look at a given situation, look at the given inputs, and possible resolutions and begin to devise a strategy on how best to manipulate the system to get the most optimum outcome.

    On failure a gamer will look back at the situation and try to understand why it is that he or she lost and will persist until victory.

    It doesn't even have to be a video game or a board game, I think just possessing the mind set where you think, "I can't just accept this defeat, I failed to accommodate an initial condition, let me try again" is what makes you a gamer.

    I'm sure you've already taken a look but if you haven't you should take a look at Game Theory or read some papers written by game theorists.

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  • mogdemonmogdemon Kansas, USRegistered User regular
    edited February 2008
    I don't particularly like discussing what the "official" definition of a "subculture-gamer" should be, because by any given definition, I or someone else on this board doesn't fit the description. That's not fair. If you have enough interest in games to be browsing G&T on Penny Arcade, and actually play them now and again, you should be allowed to call yourself a gamer. That's why I'm with the camp that prefers a more straightforward definition.

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  • JWashkeJWashke Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    did someone say weeaboos?


    seriously though, to me a gamer is anyone who can look at a given situation, look at the given inputs, and possible resolutions and begin to devise a strategy on how best to manipulate the system to get the most optimum outcome.

    On failure a gamer will look back at the situation and try to understand why it is that he or she lost and will persist until victory.

    It doesn't even have to be a video game or a board game, I think just possessing the mind set where you think, "I can't just accept this defeat, I failed to accommodate an initial condition, let me try again" is what makes you a gamer.

    I'm sure you've already taken a look but if you haven't you should take a look at Game Theory or read some papers written by game theorists.

    Man what?

    So by your definition basically every inventor and scientist is a gamer, since every invention and scientific innovation was created through trial and error. By making mistakes analyzing why you failed and retrying.

    For the OP I would try to leave the label gamer out of your project completely. Say your target demographic are games enthusiasts or hobbyists

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  • KorKor Known to detonate from time to time Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Sans definition.

    To me, a gamer is someone who considers gaming as a hobby. So yes, this would exclude that one guy that comes over to play halo for an hour once a month.

    Is he a gamer by definition? sure. Is he a gamer by my definition? no.



    If it isn't obvious already, you're going to get as many different opinions as you have posters in this thread.

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  • NevaNeva Registered User
    edited February 2008
    JWashke wrote: »
    did someone say weeaboos?


    seriously though, to me a gamer is anyone who can look at a given situation, look at the given inputs, and possible resolutions and begin to devise a strategy on how best to manipulate the system to get the most optimum outcome.

    On failure a gamer will look back at the situation and try to understand why it is that he or she lost and will persist until victory.

    It doesn't even have to be a video game or a board game, I think just possessing the mind set where you think, "I can't just accept this defeat, I failed to accommodate an initial condition, let me try again" is what makes you a gamer.

    I'm sure you've already taken a look but if you haven't you should take a look at Game Theory or read some papers written by game theorists.

    Man what?

    So by your definition basically every inventor and scientist is a gamer, since every invention and scientific innovation was created through trial and error. By making mistakes analyzing why you failed and retrying.

    For the OP I would try to leave the label gamer out of your project completely. Say your target demographic are games enthusiasts or hobbyists

    Pretty sure he meant in the context of games.

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  • JWashkeJWashke Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Well he said it doesn't have to be a video game or board game.

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  • acidlacedpenguinacidlacedpenguin Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    JWashke wrote: »
    did someone say weeaboos?


    seriously though, to me a gamer is anyone who can look at a given situation, look at the given inputs, and possible resolutions and begin to devise a strategy on how best to manipulate the system to get the most optimum outcome.

    On failure a gamer will look back at the situation and try to understand why it is that he or she lost and will persist until victory.

    It doesn't even have to be a video game or a board game, I think just possessing the mind set where you think, "I can't just accept this defeat, I failed to accommodate an initial condition, let me try again" is what makes you a gamer.

    I'm sure you've already taken a look but if you haven't you should take a look at Game Theory or read some papers written by game theorists.

    Man what?

    So by your definition basically every inventor and scientist is a gamer, since every invention and scientific innovation was created through trial and error. By making mistakes analyzing why you failed and retrying.

    For the OP I would try to leave the label gamer out of your project completely. Say your target demographic are games enthusiasts or hobbyists

    really yes. I think being a gamer means having that try try again. . .

    actually revision, I think having that quality makes you a gamer if you apply it to any kind of game.

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  • SzechuanosaurusSzechuanosaurus Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited February 2008
    Liger wrote: »
    I'm doing some research for my final COM project (design and advertise a games expo) and I'm defining my target demographic. I figured I'd go straight to the source and ask you guys. <3

    So: How do you define "gamer" and how do you see yourself fitting into that category/definition?

    SOMETHING MORE SPECIFIC THAN 'SOMEONE WHO PLAYS VIDEO GAMES," plzkthx.


    You're doing it wrong.

    Your target audience shouldn't be defined as 'gamers'. That is of extremely limited use for marketing purposes and the precise definition of 'gamer' is entirely irrelevant.

  • NevaNeva Registered User
    edited February 2008
    JWashke wrote: »
    Well he said it doesn't have to be a video game or board game.

    There are games out there that aren't board or video.

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  • RocketSauceRocketSauce Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Neva wrote: »
    JWashke wrote: »
    Well he said it doesn't have to be a video game or board game.

    There are games out there that aren't board or video.

    Like hopscotch.

  • LigerLiger Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Your target audience shouldn't be defined as 'gamers'. That is of extremely limited use for marketing purposes and the precise definition of 'gamer' is entirely irrelevant.

    'Gamers' are not my only target audience. It just happens to be the one I'm asking about in a gaming environment.

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  • Death of RatsDeath of Rats Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    My gamer is a neuronet processor, a learning computer.

  • JoahWJoahW Registered User
    edited February 2008
    JWashke wrote: »
    I like Mogdemon's definition best so far. I don't really like to use the term Gamer because I think it does imply some sort of elitism but if I had to I would define it as someone who ranks playing video games as a high priority among their hobbies. That could be someone who loves to play Peggle for a few hours everyday or the person who waits in line for 12 hours for Halo 3.

    I see it as how you prioritize your hobbies and free time. Though overall I prefer to avoid the term all together and if someone asks my hobbies I say I like to play Video games and leave it at that. I don't feel the need to apply a label to my hobby.

    If some kid does pushups, pull-ups, and runs all day, and wears boots and fatigues, that doesn't make him a Marine. Being part of that culture requires more than just going through the motions.

    Except joining the Marines is a job. Just like the "sub-culture" of doctors, bail bondsmen, chefs, etc, you do need training. Because it's a job.

    Video games (or games in general) are not a job, they are a hobby. There are no prerequisites other than an interest and the financial means to participate.

    I am curious though, what does the gamer "sub-culture" entail? You can't join unless you know X things about Y games? You have to own X systems? You need to watch primarily anime in favor of western television?

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  • FiarynFiaryn Omnicidal Madman Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    God damn it not this thread again.

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  • NevaNeva Registered User
    edited February 2008
    Neva wrote: »
    JWashke wrote: »
    Well he said it doesn't have to be a video game or board game.

    There are games out there that aren't board or video.

    Like hopscotch.

    Yeah, but those are just poser gamers.

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  • BamaBama Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Fiaryn wrote: »
    God damn it not this thread again.



    Edit: To add something mildly constructive, why the hell are you asking us to define your target? Isn't defining the target the same as selecting the target? You selected the target, so you have to have some sort of idea of what that target is.

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  • LigerLiger Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Bama wrote: »
    Fiaryn wrote: »
    God damn it not this thread again.



    Edit: To add something mildly constructive, why the hell are you asking us to define your target? Isn't defining the target the same as selecting the target? You selected the target, so you have to have some sort of idea of what that target is.

    I already know my definition. I wanted to hear yours so I can have more of an idea of what the target is and alter it if need be. Am I wrong for putting research into the project?

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  • GyralGyral Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Neva wrote: »
    JWashke wrote: »
    Well he said it doesn't have to be a video game or board game.

    There are games out there that aren't board or video.

    Head, mind, ... of the heart..., etc.

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  • BamaBama Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Liger wrote: »
    Bama wrote: »
    Fiaryn wrote: »
    God damn it not this thread again.



    Edit: To add something mildly constructive, why the hell are you asking us to define your target? Isn't defining the target the same as selecting the target? You selected the target, so you have to have some sort of idea of what that target is.

    I already know my definition. I wanted to hear yours so I can have more of an idea of what the target is and alter it if need be. Am I wrong for putting research into the project?
    I guess my issue is the use of vague terminology. It sounds like you have a target in mind (group A) and you think you should just call that group "gamers," now you want to see how that jives with other people's concept of "gamers." Well, these chuckleheads have given you groups B though ZZ, and you can see a high amount of exclusion among this set of groups that use the label "gamer." Now, wouldn't it be more prudent to just describe your target with clear language, rather than risk gross misunderstanding due to simple descriptors?

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  • slash000slash000 Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    To the OP:

    My definition of 'gamer' -

    Someone for which playing videogames is a hobby.



    It doesn't have to be their main hobby. It doesn't have to be a hobby they spend 20 hours a week on. They can be casual or light gamers, or gamers that have played games for a long time. They can play complex games or simple games.

    The defining issue here is that gaming is a 'hobby,' be it a big or casual hobby.



    That's my definition.

  • chesspiecefacechesspieceface Registered User
    edited February 2008
    Liger wrote: »
    I'm doing some research for my final COM project (design and advertise a games expo) and I'm defining my target demographic. I figured I'd go straight to the source and ask you guys. <3

    So: How do you define "gamer" and how do you see yourself fitting into that category/definition?

    SOMETHING MORE SPECIFIC THAN 'SOMEONE WHO PLAYS VIDEO GAMES," plzkthx.

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    For the love of gaming

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  • HefflingHeffling Center of Excellence Applications Engineer Alexandria, LARegistered User regular
    edited February 2008
    I would define a gamer as someone who's hobby is playing games. The games can be Video, Table-Top RPG, or even Chess. But the important part is how they see it as a hobby.

    Compare the lifestyle of a gamer to that of someone who's hobby is football, and you'll see alot of parallels.

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  • LigerLiger Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Bama wrote: »
    Liger wrote: »
    Bama wrote: »
    Fiaryn wrote: »
    God damn it not this thread again.



    Edit: To add something mildly constructive, why the hell are you asking us to define your target? Isn't defining the target the same as selecting the target? You selected the target, so you have to have some sort of idea of what that target is.

    I already know my definition. I wanted to hear yours so I can have more of an idea of what the target is and alter it if need be. Am I wrong for putting research into the project?
    I guess my issue is the use of vague terminology. It sounds like you have a target in mind (group A) and you think you should just call that group "gamers," now you want to see how that jives with other people's concept of "gamers." Well, these chuckleheads have given you groups B though ZZ, and you can see a high amount of exclusion among this set of groups that use the label "gamer." Now, wouldn't it be more prudent to just describe your target with clear language, rather than risk gross misunderstanding due to simple descriptors?

    I have a word in mind (Gamer) and want to hear your definition for said word (Gamer).

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  • BamaBama Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    That's what I said. Now how is hearing different definitions helpful? Your goal seems to be describing an audience to your teacher. Unless your teacher is the kind of dork that would argue about the meaning of "gamer" on a message board, his definition of "gamer" will likely differ from many of the ones listed in this thread.

    Now if you just have a vague idea of your audience and you're looking for help doing the leg work for defining it for your assignment, I can understand that. It makes you lazy, but I can understand it. :P

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  • RatheRathe Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    A gamer is someone who not only sets playing video games as a high priority for their free time but someone who also has a certain degree of knowledge about the video game industry.

    Playing solitaire, WOW, Madden or whatever once in awhile doesn't make you a gamer it makes you someone who plays video games once in awhile.

    Playing solitaire, WOW, Madden or whatever a lot without any real knowledge of the video game industry doesn't make you a gamer, it makes you someone that likes to play video games a lot.

    Playing solitaire, WOW, Madden or whatever a fair amount and knowing something for example like who the major players are in the video game industry and what their big franchises are probably would make you a gamer.

    This like most labels is elitist. You can complain as much as you want it doesn't change labels from being exclusive. Labels exist to exclude people.

    This like most labels for classification does come into problems with a sorties paradox (at what point does someone play enough games and know enough about the industry to go from being a non-gamer to a gamer).

  • LigerLiger Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Bama wrote: »
    That's what I said. Now how is hearing different definitions helpful? Your goal seems to be describing an audience to your teacher. Unless your teacher is the kind of dork that would argue about the meaning of "gamer" on a message board, his definition of "gamer" will likely differ from many of the ones listed in this thread.

    Now if you just have a vague idea of your audience and you're looking for help doing the leg work for defining it for your assignment, I can understand that. It makes you lazy, but I can understand it. :P

    Hearing different definitions is very helpful, because now I can safely say that there is no single definition, and that 'gamers' cover a very broad, diverse spectrum while keeping a few constants (hobby, passion, etc). I don't see how market research can be seen as lazy.

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  • minor incidentminor incident a crow, a scavenger type Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Veevee wrote: »
    Axen wrote: »
    Gyral wrote: »
    LewieP wrote: »
    Someone who plays video games.

    My sister needs some help. She just had to rush her cat to the emergency clinic because he was peeing blood. The little guy needs a $2500 surgery to survive, and she has no money left after paying for major car repairs last week. If you would consider sharing this on your twitter/facebook/whatever, that would be greatly appreciated. If you have a few dollars to pitch in and help her, that would be even more amazing of you. http://www.gofundme.com/clq06k
  • DirtyDirty Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Magic Pink wrote: »
    If you play videogames, you're a gamer. Period.

    Freedom Evans. He's a gamer. Period.

  • ZombiemamboZombiemambo Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Anyone who enjoys playing games as spends money on the hobby. For example, your friend coming over to your house to play your Wii. If he doesn't own any systems or games, he's not a gamer, even though he enjoys them. I think people actually have to have invested time and money into the hobby.

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  • Mr PeepersMr Peepers Registered User
    edited February 2008
    I would say someone who regularly plays video games. Some may want to include those who are at least a little familiar with gaming history and 'culture', but just anyone who enjoys playing a few games now and then is a gamer in my opinion.

    Breaking it down into sub categories (casual, hardcore, etc) annoys the hell out of me though.

  • nosnibornosnibor Registered User
    edited February 2008
    Anyone who enjoys playing games as spends money on the hobby. For example, your friend coming over to your house to play your Wii. If he doesn't own any systems or games, he's not a gamer, even though he enjoys them. I think people actually have to have invested time and money into the hobby.

    Especially since, according to the OP, the idea is to design and market a "games expo." The target audience is not going to be grandmothers who play Bejeweled and Solitaire, it's going to be a more serious crowd of people who are interested in games as more than just a casual thing.

    I understand that "gamer" probably should mean "anyone who plays games," but in the context of the OP, it's probably closer to what PAers might describe as "hardcore gamer."

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  • ZombiemamboZombiemambo Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    But I don't think people who play Solitaire and Bejeweled aren't gamers. It's the people who play games on occasion at someone else's house, who enjoy them but don't pursue the hobby any further than minor interest. If you spent $20 on a copy of Zuma and you play it, you're a gamer in my book.

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  • XtarathXtarath Registered User
    edited February 2008
    These threads almost always turn into arguments. :(

    But I might as well add what I think.

    They should know at least 5 Third-party developers so they don't just think that hey I played halo and was the dude in the shiny suit so I am gamer! Time for a kegger!

  • LittleBootsLittleBoots Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Xtarath wrote: »
    These threads almost always turn into arguments. :(

    But I might as well add what I think.

    They should know at least 5 Third-party developers so they don't just think that hey I played halo and was the dude in the shiny suit so I am gamer! Time for a kegger!

    keg%20dude%20small.jpg


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  • unknownsome1unknownsome1 Registered User
    edited February 2008
    A gamer is someone who plays video games as a hobby. Someone who plays minesweeper or solitaire on his or her computer on a daily basis can be considered a gamer but not much of one. I wouldn't even consider that person to be a casual gamer.

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