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On playing guitar

SpackleSpackle Registered User
edited February 2008 in Ancient Forum Knowledge
Just picked up a guitar about 3 weeks ago and enjoying it immensely. I did, however, recall there being a post awhile back where someone posted some great "learn to play metal" tutorials for getting yourself ready to tackle today's popular metal.

Anyone remember these? I never actually looked at the tuts, just recall the thread.

Spackle on
Taco Bell does win the franchise war according to the tome of knowledge that is Demolition Man. However, I've watched Demolition Man more then a few times and never once did I see WoW. In conclusion Taco Bell has more lasting power then WoW.
D&D Metal Thread: HERE
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Posts

  • krlkrl Registered User regular
    edited April 2006
    Some links to some very good guitar tutorials.

  • PheezerPheezer Registered User, ClubPA
    edited April 2006
    Learn scales. Lots of them. Start with the major, open position ones.

    Buy a metronome or use that website, and every day do the following:

    First, learn a new scale. Learning C Major in Open position counts as one scale, learning C Major in 8th position counts as another.

    Turn on the metronome. Start out at 60 BPM. This is painfully slow. Most popular music is written at 120 BPM. But start at 60. On day two, go to 61. Then 62. Increment by 1 BPM every single day. Play every scale you know, forwards and backwards, until you play it flawlessly.


    This is the most dry, boring possible way to absolutely master every scale you'll ever need to learn, and within a year you'll be playing faster and more accurately than anyone you know. If you really, really want to get good, you'll stick with it though, despite the fact that this technique will often make you absolutely furious, and most of the rest of the time leave you pretty bored.

    Then you can focus on learning solos from metal songs, or learning techniques like string tapping. The road to blowing heads clean off is an arduous and boring one.

    You could also just buy a book of Maiden tabs and practice each song until you can parrot what's being played on their albums perfectly. Then when someone asks you to play a riff at half the speed you were tearing through it and you can't do it for the life of you, your girlfriend can have a nice, hearty laugh at your expense and leave with the bassist.
    Don't let your girl leave with the bassist. She won't be coming back.

    IT'S GOT ME REACHING IN MY POCKET IT'S GOT ME FORKING OVER CASH
    CUZ THERE'S SOMETHING IN THE MIDDLE AND IT'S GIVING ME A RASH
  • SpackleSpackle Registered User
    edited April 2006
    pheezer FD wrote:
    Learn scales. Lots of them. Start with the major, open position ones.

    Buy a metronome or use that website, and every day do the following:

    First, learn a new scale. Learning C Major in Open position counts as one scale, learning C Major in 8th position counts as another.

    Turn on the metronome. Start out at 60 BPM. This is painfully slow. Most popular music is written at 120 BPM. But start at 60. On day two, go to 61. Then 62. Increment by 1 BPM every single day. Play every scale you know, forwards and backwards, until you play it flawlessly.


    This is the most dry, boring possible way to absolutely master every scale you'll ever need to learn, and within a year you'll be playing faster and more accurately than anyone you know. If you really, really want to get good, you'll stick with it though, despite the fact that this technique will often make you absolutely furious, and most of the rest of the time leave you pretty bored.

    Then you can focus on learning solos from metal songs, or learning techniques like string tapping. The road to blowing heads clean off is an arduous and boring one.

    You could also just buy a book of Maiden tabs and practice each song until you can parrot what's being played on their albums perfectly. Then when someone asks you to play a riff at half the speed you were tearing through it and you can't do it for the life of you, your girlfriend can have a nice, hearty laugh at your expense and leave with the bassist.
    Don't let your girl leave with the bassist. She won't be coming back.

    Erm, duly noted about the bassist. As for your dry tedious method, would playing scales for 30 min then switching to some tabbed music or just plain exploring the guitar be viable to break up the monotony?

    I really enjoy some of the newer metal like As I lay Dying, Trivium, In Flames(old and new) as well as the harder stuff like Strapping Young Lad, Unearth, and Cradle of Filth. I noticed the music has a strong Palm Mute emphasis on the E string so I've been working my forearm up to that.

    I will work on scales though, as I can see how that will bring precision and speed.

    Taco Bell does win the franchise war according to the tome of knowledge that is Demolition Man. However, I've watched Demolition Man more then a few times and never once did I see WoW. In conclusion Taco Bell has more lasting power then WoW.
    D&D Metal Thread: HERE
  • PheezerPheezer Registered User, ClubPA
    edited April 2006
    Spackle wrote:
    Erm, duly noted about the bassist. As for your dry tedious method, would playing scales for 30 min then switching to some tabbed music or just plain exploring the guitar be viable to break up the monotony?

    I really enjoy some of the newer metal like As I lay Dying, Trivium, In Flames(old and new) as well as the harder stuff like Strapping Young Lad, Unearth, and Cradle of Filth. I noticed the music has a strong Palm Mute emphasis on the E string so I've been working my forearm up to that.

    I will work on scales though, as I can see how that will bring precision and speed.

    Oh, you can do whatever else you like. There's no reason to stop playing after you've done your daily excercises, but keep in mind that it's the excercises that are making you stronger.

    It's like being a football player, constantly playing pickup games with your buddies is fun, and it keeps you having fun with the sport, but it's constant drills and a heavy workout routine that makes you capable of being good.

    And I'm dead serious about the bassist. I play bass. I know.

    Oh, and if you have trouble with muscle endurance, buying a some callipers and squeezing away on those when you're watching TV or whatever will help out a lot.

    IT'S GOT ME REACHING IN MY POCKET IT'S GOT ME FORKING OVER CASH
    CUZ THERE'S SOMETHING IN THE MIDDLE AND IT'S GIVING ME A RASH
  • NuffNuff Registered User
    edited April 2006
    There's a story I once heard about Eddie V. His brother left at 6pm to go to a party and Eddie was sitting on the edge of his bed, working on a scale, with a 12 pack of beer by his feet. When his brother came back at 3am, thrashed, Eddie was still sitting there, playing the same scale, all the beer gone. The lesson? You also can be that fast...and you can also be an alcoholic... Not sure if there is truth to that story or not, if anyone knows, feel free to post a reply.

    Anyway, on the topic of getting better.

    First, I cannot agree enough with the advice to learn scales and master them. It is very important. Once you have some down, maybe even look for a book on scale and chord theory.

    Second, play stuff you like. Just because Guitar World has a tab for some obscure Vai tune in it that is supposed to be cool doesn't mean you'll enjoy playing it.

    Third, jam with people who are better than you are. You'll get hella good, hella quick. Playing with others is a great way to get better. Dont worry about being perfect. I heard about this fella named Page who missed tons of notes on recordings and he did ok.

    Finally, forget metal and learn some blues. I know this contradicts what I just said about playing stuff you like, but seriously, speed has nothing to do with it. It's more about the notes you DON'T play, than the ones you do. It's ok to love to rock out, but blues will help develop your feel for timing, and your ability to improvise. Any monkey can work scales over and over until they are playing at such a speed that their fingers have broken the sound barrier. However, it takes actual musical talent to be able to play that 1 note, alone, with perfect sustain, to create something incredible. I'm not saying for you to throw out your leather pants, cut your mullet and shave your crust-tache. I'm just saying, give something completely different a try. I detest most of what is classified as "metal". However, I have done excercises writen by so-called "metal guys" to improve my speed. I also just picked up a Johny Cash disc. Never been a big fan, but I'm already implementing some of the cooler stuff in my work.

    It's all about understanding the mechanics so then you can forget it all and do what sounds (read: feels) right. Also, I would highly recommend finding out who your influences are/were influenced by. Im a big Zeppelin, Clapton and SRV fan, so I've listened and worked on a ton of Robert Johnson, BB King, Albert King, etc, stuff. You may find that they are listening to stuff that you never would have suspected.

    Keep pickin' and grinin'

    Matt

  • SpackleSpackle Registered User
    edited April 2006
    I'm actually looking forward to listening to music I thought I'd never like.

    The reason for my picking up the guitar was back in high school (22 now) I had a buddy that had a few years of guitar under his belt. We'd get pretty messed up and I'd listen to him strum away. Most of what he played was metal and I thought it was the coolest sounding machine I'd ever heard. He'd play for hours and I'd listen. Since then I've always want to play like that, it just happened to fall upon metal as our music taste.

    I've only recently aquired the time to actually start playing, and I appreciate the advice you guys have given me. Might as well play correct from the beginning. Like all things, the basics are the most fundamental.

    Taco Bell does win the franchise war according to the tome of knowledge that is Demolition Man. However, I've watched Demolition Man more then a few times and never once did I see WoW. In conclusion Taco Bell has more lasting power then WoW.
    D&D Metal Thread: HERE
  • chuck steakchuck steak Registered User regular
    edited April 2006
    here's a few tips from a fellow noob, a bit further down the line than you (been playing daily for about 5 months now):

    1. no matter how hard something seams, with enough practice it is doable. i can't remember how many times i came across a chord that seamed impossible to play because i couldn't even get my fingers in the right position, let alone produce a nice clear sound. but now i can play these chords without even thinking about it and move between most chords with relative ease. i'm rather amazed with how far along i've come in this regard, i didn't think i'd ever be able to play like i can now, much less as quickly as i did.

    2. learn fun easy songs. jack johnson and ben harper have some really great simple songs, i highly recommend learning some if you at all enjoy this kind of music. it's all accoustic though, which may not work so well on an electric if that's all you got. i haven't really learnt many simple electric songs (having too much fun with the accoustic) but the white stripes have a few, and punk in general is usually pretty simple. at any rate, i probably wouldn't have come as far as i have if it wasn't for learning songs that i really like and are fun to play.

    3. stick with it. it's tough and there's a whole lot to learn, but if you play for at least a half hour a day you'll notice fairly quick progress. when i first started playing i only picked it up a couple of times a week (mostly because of frustration due to it being so tough) and wasn't going anywhere for a couple of months. but once i started making myself play daily the progress was phenomenal.


    good luck, at first you will certainly need it :P

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    DON'T PANIC
  • CptKemzikCptKemzik Registered User regular
    edited April 2006
    All I can say about getting good at guitar is to practice, practice, practice. There aren't any shortcuts to success.

    What to practice? Well ill add to the chorus of learning your scales, chords, chord progressions etc. to build up a nice library of theory. Yeah at first it's going to be boring as hell at first and frustrating, but like other people have said, its the only way to really become proficient at the instrument.

    However I'd also like to add that you should take up some jazz. Not a lot, but try to learn some popular jazz guitar tunes and dabble a bit in improv. Yes it most certaintly is not metal, which is what you want to play, however getting your feet wet in jazz guitar will only help you; if only because most genres of guitar playing can trace something to jazz.

    This is off topic, but is it just me, or do a lotta PA'ers around here play the bass guitar in a band? I thought such players, like myself, were a rarity... well at least where I live... :|

  • gobassgogobassgo Registered User
    edited April 2006
    Lots of people start off on bass because it's "easier than guitar".

  • A-RodA-Rod Registered User
    edited April 2006
    Dont forget your chords. I know most metal bands just slap together some power chords, and some riffs, but dont forget the basics.

  • PheezerPheezer Registered User, ClubPA
    edited April 2006
    gobassgo wrote:
    Lots of people start off on bass because it's "easier than guitar".

    This is why there are so many shitty bassists in the world. If you're going to play bass, play bass to be good at playing bass. It's a different skillset than playing guitar. If you're going to play bass because you're too shitty to play guitar, just get a guitar and be shitty at an instrument you like. At least then someone will enjoy your playing.

    IT'S GOT ME REACHING IN MY POCKET IT'S GOT ME FORKING OVER CASH
    CUZ THERE'S SOMETHING IN THE MIDDLE AND IT'S GIVING ME A RASH
  • PheezerPheezer Registered User, ClubPA
    edited April 2006
    A-Rod wrote:
    Dont forget your chords. I know most metal bands just slap together some power chords, and some riffs, but dont forget the basics.

    Chords should be emphasized after scales are mastered and become natural, for the simple reason that the way notes fit together in scales defines how chords fit together to form melodies. You could go the other way around, but your technique would probably be rife with terrible habits, and I'd say that learning scales and getting the hang of stringing notes together in an enjoyable fashion builds into getting chords to connect nicely a lot better than the opposite.

    IT'S GOT ME REACHING IN MY POCKET IT'S GOT ME FORKING OVER CASH
    CUZ THERE'S SOMETHING IN THE MIDDLE AND IT'S GIVING ME A RASH
  • KyzenKyzen Registered User
    edited April 2006
    This is some pretty great advice... I'm in a similar boat as the original poster. Thanks :)

  • IcemopperIcemopper Registered User regular
    edited April 2006
    Someone said earlier to learn classical methods first. For one thing, playing classically and playing like metal are often so different that it's nearly a new instrument. Not to say that's a bad idea, but I don't know of too many rock guitarists who fingerpick the same way classical artists do.

    But like pheezer said, the best way to learn something is a very slow and boring road. Keep at it though and you'll rock. Do the method exactly as pheezer explained, playing something slow at first and slowly increasing speed, and you'll get songs perfect in no time. Once you get better you can maybe up the BPM more and in less time. I find this to be the best method of learning a song. So in summary, basically everything everybody else has already said.

    7nUkagJ.png
    SteamID:Icemopper PSN:Icemopper
  • gobassgogobassgo Registered User
    edited April 2006
    pheezer FD wrote:
    gobassgo wrote:
    Lots of people start off on bass because it's "easier than guitar".

    This is why there are so many shitty bassists in the world. If you're going to play bass, play bass to be good at playing bass. It's a different skillset than playing guitar. If you're going to play bass because you're too shitty to play guitar, just get a guitar and be shitty at an instrument you like. At least then someone will enjoy your playing.

    Amen.
    [edit]
    Also, learn scale patterns, as in learn to be able to break up the scale into thirds, 4ths, 5ths, 6ths, 7ths, etc.

  • JeedanJeedan Registered User regular
    edited April 2006
    pheezer FD wrote:
    gobassgo wrote:
    Lots of people start off on bass because it's "easier than guitar".

    This is why there are so many shitty bassists in the world. If you're going to play bass, play bass to be good at playing bass. It's a different skillset than playing guitar. If you're going to play bass because you're too shitty to play guitar, just get a guitar and be shitty at an instrument you like. At least then someone will enjoy your playing.

    Also I find bass to be physicall harder than guitar. I have a friend who plays bass and when we swap instruments it sounds awful. I play bass like a guiarist, all plucky and my hands get tired from the huge strings. He plays guitar like a bassist, he doesent know how to move his fingers economically.

  • SpackleSpackle Registered User
    edited April 2006
    might this post be candidate to 'accumlated forum knowledge'? You guys have already gotten me started on the right path with the ability to progess and advance down the road. Good stuff.

    Taco Bell does win the franchise war according to the tome of knowledge that is Demolition Man. However, I've watched Demolition Man more then a few times and never once did I see WoW. In conclusion Taco Bell has more lasting power then WoW.
    D&D Metal Thread: HERE
  • YosemiteSamYosemiteSam Registered User regular
    edited April 2006
    pheezer FD wrote:
    Learn scales. Lots of them. Start with the major, open position ones.

    Buy a metronome or use that website, and every day do the following:

    First, learn a new scale. Learning C Major in Open position counts as one scale, learning C Major in 8th position counts as another.
    Some really basic questions: are you supposed to use different fingers as you go up and down the scale or the same one? Are you supposed to switch strings as soon as you can? Also, on an acoustic, how exactly are you supposed to release the note when you don't want to let it ring until the string stops vibrating on its own?

    We are all very lucky to live in a world where there is this much music.
  • SpackleSpackle Registered User
    edited April 2006
    I fall victim to the accidental picks offs myself. I"m guess practice practice practice and you'll eventually pick off correctly. Could be wrong. I also try to use all my fingers. I suspect thats where speed comes in, using various fingers to pick each note. Google video has a fair amount of videos where they show people playing guitar and you can see how they pick and where there fingers are.

    I'd like to say thanks guys for suggesting blues. I started playing the blues scales (open) and found them quite interesting. Loaded up Last.fm and have been chilling out to some of the coolest sounds I've ever heard.

    :^:

    Taco Bell does win the franchise war according to the tome of knowledge that is Demolition Man. However, I've watched Demolition Man more then a few times and never once did I see WoW. In conclusion Taco Bell has more lasting power then WoW.
    D&D Metal Thread: HERE
  • IcemopperIcemopper Registered User regular
    edited April 2006
    pheezer FD wrote:
    Learn scales. Lots of them. Start with the major, open position ones.

    Buy a metronome or use that website, and every day do the following:

    First, learn a new scale. Learning C Major in Open position counts as one scale, learning C Major in 8th position counts as another.
    Some really basic questions: are you supposed to use different fingers as you go up and down the scale or the same one? Are you supposed to switch strings as soon as you can? Also, on an acoustic, how exactly are you supposed to release the note when you don't want to let it ring until the string stops vibrating on its own?

    Here. This is kinda basic showing the notes all over a neck. Pick a position, preferably one starting on the root, and just go up and down the strings like that till you've got it straight.

    That link covers a lot, but it shows what you want.

    Don't stop playing guitar if you like it. Serriously. Thats why I'm a music major. Every other guitarist here is doing something they hate. I couldnt be happier. Just keep at it.

    EDIT: The second one down in that link is your basic major scale. There are others that you can learn on the open strings but if you know these backwards forwards, by thirds, fifths, fourths, everything else, then you'll be right as rain.

    EDIT2: What exactly do you mean by that second question.. the acoustic one? Do you mean muting?

    7nUkagJ.png
    SteamID:Icemopper PSN:Icemopper
  • YosemiteSamYosemiteSam Registered User regular
    edited April 2006
    Daiquiri wrote:
    EDIT2: What exactly do you mean by that second question.. the acoustic one? Do you mean muting?
    I don't know, probably. I'm talking about if you are in the middle of playing a line and you are switching strings, but you don't want the last string you played to keep vibrating until it stops on its own. I'm guessing this is a really common, really basic technique, I just don't know what exactly it is.

    Thanks for the link.

    We are all very lucky to live in a world where there is this much music.
  • SpackleSpackle Registered User
    edited April 2006
    I'm having a problem with my guitar. The bottome 3 strings (three smallest) are sittin a bit to low. I can tell because on the smallest string all the way up to fret 5 it sounds the exact same and has a banjoish sound. After fret 5 it plays as expected. The above next two have the same trend but they return to normal sounds after fret 3.

    A friend said to replace the bridge or just remove the bridge and set it a bit higher. I'm aware of what the bridge is but, is this a task I should have a shop take care of?

    Taco Bell does win the franchise war according to the tome of knowledge that is Demolition Man. However, I've watched Demolition Man more then a few times and never once did I see WoW. In conclusion Taco Bell has more lasting power then WoW.
    D&D Metal Thread: HERE
  • CycophantCycophant Registered User
    edited April 2006
    Spackle wrote:
    I'm having a problem with my guitar. The bottome 3 strings (three smallest) are sittin a bit to low. I can tell because on the smallest string all the way up to fret 5 it sounds the exact same and has a banjoish sound. After fret 5 it plays as expected. The above next two have the same trend but they return to normal sounds after fret 3.

    A friend said to replace the bridge or just remove the bridge and set it a bit higher. I'm aware of what the bridge is but, is this a task I should have a shop take care of?

    Yes. Well, maybe. If this is a basic, run-of-the-mill electric guitar like a Strat/Telecaster, raising the action of the strings is easy (simply adjusting some screw posts that the bridge is attached to). However, if your guitar is something a little more complicated, or it's an acoustic, I'd suggest taking it in to your local music store. Tell them what you want, and they should be able to do it fairly quickly and fairly cheaply.

    sig.gif
  • SpackleSpackle Registered User
    edited April 2006
    Cycophant wrote:
    Spackle wrote:
    I'm having a problem with my guitar. The bottome 3 strings (three smallest) are sittin a bit to low. I can tell because on the smallest string all the way up to fret 5 it sounds the exact same and has a banjoish sound. After fret 5 it plays as expected. The above next two have the same trend but they return to normal sounds after fret 3.

    A friend said to replace the bridge or just remove the bridge and set it a bit higher. I'm aware of what the bridge is but, is this a task I should have a shop take care of?

    Yes. Well, maybe. If this is a basic, run-of-the-mill electric guitar like a Strat/Telecaster, raising the action of the strings is easy (simply adjusting some screw posts that the bridge is attached to). However, if your guitar is something a little more complicated, or it's an acoustic, I'd suggest taking it in to your local music store. Tell them what you want, and they should be able to do it fairly quickly and fairly cheaply.

    Oh it is very run of the mill. It's a cheap one, wanted to see if I actually like playing. Mid summer i'll jump into a nicer guitar but this guy will hold me over fine. I'll look into the screws you describe when I get home. It seemed to me though that I would need to melt? (melt the glue I assume) in order to re-set the bridge.

    Taco Bell does win the franchise war according to the tome of knowledge that is Demolition Man. However, I've watched Demolition Man more then a few times and never once did I see WoW. In conclusion Taco Bell has more lasting power then WoW.
    D&D Metal Thread: HERE
  • IcemopperIcemopper Registered User regular
    edited April 2006
    Daiquiri wrote:
    EDIT2: What exactly do you mean by that second question.. the acoustic one? Do you mean muting?
    I don't know, probably. I'm talking about if you are in the middle of playing a line and you are switching strings, but you don't want the last string you played to keep vibrating until it stops on its own. I'm guessing this is a really common, really basic technique, I just don't know what exactly it is.

    Thanks for the link.

    You're probably talking about muting I think. I use a couple methods. One is the hand that is on the neck, using one of the fingers there to mute it while pressing down on the next string. This is easier on a lower pitch string than the one you just played, simply put your fingertip on the note you want and sorta tilt it down to mute the one you just played.
    The other method is using my strumming palm. Sounds simple but can be tough sometimes if you're playing a fast lick. Just keep practicing with muting with your palm and I'm sure you'll get it.

    7nUkagJ.png
    SteamID:Icemopper PSN:Icemopper
  • T-boltT-bolt Registered User regular
    edited April 2006
    Spackle wrote:
    Cycophant wrote:
    Spackle wrote:
    I'm having a problem with my guitar. The bottome 3 strings (three smallest) are sittin a bit to low. I can tell because on the smallest string all the way up to fret 5 it sounds the exact same and has a banjoish sound. After fret 5 it plays as expected. The above next two have the same trend but they return to normal sounds after fret 3.

    A friend said to replace the bridge or just remove the bridge and set it a bit higher. I'm aware of what the bridge is but, is this a task I should have a shop take care of?

    Yes. Well, maybe. If this is a basic, run-of-the-mill electric guitar like a Strat/Telecaster, raising the action of the strings is easy (simply adjusting some screw posts that the bridge is attached to). However, if your guitar is something a little more complicated, or it's an acoustic, I'd suggest taking it in to your local music store. Tell them what you want, and they should be able to do it fairly quickly and fairly cheaply.

    Oh it is very run of the mill. It's a cheap one, wanted to see if I actually like playing. Mid summer i'll jump into a nicer guitar but this guy will hold me over fine. I'll look into the screws you describe when I get home. It seemed to me though that I would need to melt? (melt the glue I assume) in order to re-set the bridge.
    Melt glue? Sounds like yuo are using an acoustic... Anyway, adjusting bridges when you don't know what you are doing is a good way to mess up the intonation of your guitar and make it even harder to play. If you have a friend that's good with guitar ask them to help (though not everyone knows how to adjust intonation on a bridge), or I'll echo someone else's suggestion of taking it to your local guitar shop and have it set up professionaly.

    PSN: P-bass [USF4, SF3:3s, MVC3]
  • Vladz0rVladz0r Registered User
    edited April 2006
    Pretty much all of the advice is dead on. Just play around and have fun with it. You get better by playing so just play.

    And I was looking through the links, and I couldn't find any links to any actual scales you can practice, so I thought it might be helpful if you looked through here.

    I've used that website a couple times for practicing and for help writing songs. It has pretty much every scale, you can chose what the root note is, what position the notes are in, all that stuff. It even gives tabs for the scale if you find it hard to read a fretboard like that.

    The only thing it can't do is alternate tunings, but you can always transpose it. <img class=" title=":wink:" class="bbcode_smiley" />

    I hope you find it helpful.

    Love iz a fat turkey and everyday iz
    thanksgiving
  • MalevolentPirateMalevolentPirate Registered User
    edited April 2006
    First learn notes on the neck and what the strings are (E,A,D,G,B,e from low to high). 1 fret is a half step, which means the "D" string open is a "D" note and fretted at the 1st fret is a D#, then 2nd would be an E. Playing fretted notes with an open string of the same note is a good way of checking. Two half steps obviously make a whole step, as in D to E. The notes in Western music are A, A#/Bb, B, C, C#/Db, D, D#/Eb, E, F, F#/Gb, G and G#/Ab. If you play your A string chromatically, that's the notes you'd have played until you reach the 12th fret where it repeats with the A again (when an octave is reached).

    I suggest learning what notes are in what key and the chords they can form. You can start with a scale with no accidentals (sharp and flat) like in C, then learn a scale with 1 accidental which is G, then D, E, etc. Changing the root of these scales (the starting note) to their VI note will make them minor. For example; you have the I ii iii IV V vi vii notes and chords in key, like in G, which is
    G A B C D E F# thus making E the relative minor (E F# G A B C D) for the key of Em. The chords in (a major) key are always Major, minor, minor, Major, Major, minor and diminished. So the chords you'd normally hear in a song that's in C would be C, Dm, Em, F, G, Am, Bdim. Sevenths and suspended chords can also be naturally in key because they're just notes added or changed to the chords in key, but augmented never will be natural.

    Learn all the chords you can in open position first, then barr then and try using a capo for more options. Once you figure out how chords are made its pretty easy to find any chord anywhere - even if you've never played it before. Major chords are made from the I, III & V notes, like C, E & G in a C major. minor is I bIII & V, so it'd be C, Eb & G for C minor. Diminished is I, bIII & bV and augmented is I, III & #V.

    Suspended chords remove the III note and replace it with either a II, or IV note depending on if its sus2 or sus4. Sevenths just add a 7 to the already major or minor (or whatever) chord. So adding a 7th to a G would make it G (I), B (III), D (V), and F (VII) for the notes in Gmaj7. Naturally, a 6th would be the same concept but with an added E (VI) instead of the F (VII).

    Most of the tricks and whatnot will be picked up naturally along with your general speed and accuracy. Vibrattos, bends, rakes and the whole bit should all be fairly easy to figure out. My last peice of advice is to learn by ear and less by tab or sheet. Tabs are okay but I personally never remember how to play stuff I read and a lot of them are out of key anyway. Sheet music is a pain in the ass, if I didn't play piano I wouldn't even have learned to read it. Most importantly, remember to listen to a lot of Chuck Berry.


    EDIT: The Guitar Grimoire is a good book for scales

    Member Since April 2004
  • DogDog Registered User, Administrator, Vanilla Staff admin
    edited April 2006
    Unless you're extremely good at self discipline and can force yourself to practise PROPERLY every day then you should probably get a teacher.

  • PatboyXPatboyX Registered User regular
    edited May 2006
    has anybody ever used the Line Pro or whatever its called?
    its basically a pedal that plugs into the computer and then you go online and synch up with a library of songs that it has you play along with at whatever speed you want.

    ive been playing for awhile and it looks like it could be a lot of fun but i would like to hear from the folks around here about it.

    "lenny bruce is not afraid..."
    brush1rt1.jpg
  • KeithKeith Registered User regular
    edited July 2006
    I got a guitar for my birthday from a friend yesterday (Oscar Schmidt by Washburn Delta King or something, if that matters) and I remembered I'm the absolute worst at string instruments, but hey, that's what practice is for.

    My biggest trouble right now is playing chords. I can read tabs and music (I think, I haven't looked at guitar music yet, but I can read sheet music for other instruments). I can't get my fingers right, and then I can't strum them right. Granted my guitar is out of tune (I'm borrowing an amp and tuner from a friend tomorrow), but should it be this hard at first?

    It needs more big, colored buttons like Guitar Hero.

  • Vladz0rVladz0r Registered User
    edited July 2006
    Yeah, it is pretty hard at first,

    when i started doing chords, i had a lot of trouble.

    Just try and practice moving all your fingers as a hand, and not as individual fingers.

    And focus on having each finger touch only one string, having your fingers unwantedly mute strings was the main problem i had, so try and practice only hitting the string you want with each finger. Just practice alot and youll get the hang of it.

    Love iz a fat turkey and everyday iz
    thanksgiving
  • eric.eric. __BANNED USERS
    edited February 2007
    It's tough to keep at it with music theory and practicing scales. I've been playing the guitar for close to 5 years now and I still get incredibly bored doing it. I need someone to kick my ass more when I get bored. :roll:

  • TubeTube Working As Intended Administrator, ClubPA admin
    edited February 2007
    Man, if you're getting bored you're doing it wrong. Do something you find fun! Unless you're planning to go pro there's no reason to be doing dull shit. Hell, even then really.

  • eric.eric. __BANNED USERS
    edited February 2007
    Oh, it's all worth it when the ladies are swoonin' after I bust out some classic Bach on their ass.











    I'm fucked up. :roll:

  • [Assassination Attempt!][Assassination Attempt!] __BANNED USERS
    edited February 2007
    I can play paint it black and street spirit by radiohead. pwnage.

    mindliberator.png
  • MitsuhideMitsuhide Registered User
    edited February 2007
    I really want to get a cheap-ass guitar 'package'. (Black Silvertone Strat knock-off with little amp, song books, etc.) from my local Wal-Mart. Yes, I know, but I'm too cheap to buy anything better. Because I have a pretty decent amount of knowledge in Classical guitar (thank you, tenth-grade guitar class!), I'm not sure that if I start playing something more Metal, like the OP, that I'm going to have to re-learn everything I know. I'm most worried about playing style, because I primarily play using my fingers, kind of like a bass. This worries me. Anyone have any tips for jumping from Classical to Metal? :)

  • SpackleSpackle Registered User
    edited February 2007
    Hey my thread is still here!

    Don't get a silvertone. At least get a Fender Strat Squier starter pack. I have a cheap silvertone and hate it. Awful to learn on.

    I've actually been playing almost daily for at least an hour since I made that post, so I've defintely made progress.

    Take it slow. You'll probably find the pick a bit wierd at first so when you sit down to play, spend 15 minutes on excersizes for the sole purpose of picking.

    something like
    e|--------------------------------------------------------------
    B|--------------------------------------------------------------
    G|--------------------------------------------------------------
    D|-------------------------0-1-2-3-4-------------------------
    A|-------------0-1-2-3-4-------------0-1-2-3-4------------
    E|0-1-2-3-4---------------------------------------0-1-2-3-4
    

    nice and slow, down up down up. Good picking developed early on will be very beneficial.

    I doubt you'll have to 're-learn' everything but you will have to adapt. The first thing I did was look up tabs for popular Metallica songs on the 'Black' album and tried to replicate them. I think "Enter Sandman" was the first thing I learned. It actually turned out to be a fun lesson in power chords, hitting single notes cleanly without bumping others, and palm muting. Intro to Metal, if you will.

    The rest is just practice, daily if possible. But you knew that already :P

    Taco Bell does win the franchise war according to the tome of knowledge that is Demolition Man. However, I've watched Demolition Man more then a few times and never once did I see WoW. In conclusion Taco Bell has more lasting power then WoW.
    D&D Metal Thread: HERE
  • MitsuhideMitsuhide Registered User
    edited February 2007
    Oh, good. I thought the thread died! <img class=" title=":wink:" class="bbcode_smiley" />

    So yeah, fuck the Silvertone, now I want to get an Ibanez starter. Just wanted your guy's input.

    Also, thanks for the tab. :P

  • SpackleSpackle Registered User
    edited February 2007
    Mitsuhide wrote: »
    Oh, good. I thought the thread died! <img class=" title=":wink:" class="bbcode_smiley" />

    So yeah, fuck the Silvertone, now I want to get an Ibanez starter. Just wanted your guy's input.

    Also, thanks for the tab. :P

    I used to have a ton of excersise tabs that I used to develop metal playing.

    Playing what I have above gets boring REALLY fast, so alternate picking scales can be used as a good excersise as well. What kind of metal do you want to play?

    Taco Bell does win the franchise war according to the tome of knowledge that is Demolition Man. However, I've watched Demolition Man more then a few times and never once did I see WoW. In conclusion Taco Bell has more lasting power then WoW.
    D&D Metal Thread: HERE
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