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International Travellers Guide to PAX '08

2

Posts

  • ElectricTurtleElectricTurtle Registered User
    edited June 2008
    In US law there are basically two categories (which have further subcategories and degrees): misdemeanor and felony. The difference is HUGE. Misdemeanors are usually minor things like, well, jaywalking, speeding and parking tickets for which there are fines. Felonies are big criminal matters like grand theft, murder, etc. and involve imprisonment and the suspension of rights such as voting and ownership of firearms. Moral of the story: don't toss the word 'felony' around lightly when speaking of US law.

    Jaywalking is a misdemeanor. Jail time is unheard of, and while I haven't looked up the RCW, I believe it's also impossible (this is not legal advice and I am not a lawyer). Pedestrian right of way in most states is determined by context (some states have a permanent right of way like the UK, but not WA). In WA, if a pedestrian has a crosswalk with no signal, or with a walk signal, they have the right of way. Otherwise they don't.

    Moe's advice is sound though, do what the locals do. When I lived downtown I would cross streets all the time so long as I wouldn't be in the way of cars.

    Spoiler:
  • kropotkinkropotkin Mr London UKRegistered User regular
    edited June 2008
    Good points there Mr Turtle, I shall now amend the original post accordingly.

  • AngelHedgieAngelHedgie Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    Oh, before you get here, it is a very good idea to find out where the nearest consulate for your home nation is. Since we are talking Seattle, most major nations have a consulate in town.

    XBL: Nox Aeternum / PSN: NoxAeternum / NN:NoxAeternum
    Spoiler:
  • MaoChanMaoChan Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    Oh, before you get here, it is a very good idea to find out where the nearest consulate for your home nation is. Since we are talking Seattle, most major nations have a consulate in town.

    For most people, this won't be needed unless they are looking to start shit. I've been to plenty of countries and you go, show up, have a good time, and then leave. Really here is the ultimate tip:

    Don't do whatever is illegal in your country in our country and follow everyone else. CONFORM!!

  • Queen BrewerQueen Brewer Registered User
    edited June 2008
    This isn't legal advice but...

    If there are pedestrian walk signs, which will either be Walk/Don't Walk or White Person/Read Hand, don't walk. When the Don't Walk/Red Hand starts blinking, you can finish crossing if you've already entered, but don't enter the street, though everyone does anyway.

    If there isn't a pedestrian walk sign but there is a light, just follow the light, crossing with green, stopping on red etc.

    If there are no lights you always have the right of way at an intersection to cross from one corner to another, but not diagonally, even if there is no marked crosswalk.

    If you are not between two intersections with lights, you may cross at any point as long as you give right of way to cars.

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    <Moe_Fwacky> nice girls
    <Moe_Fwacky> lesbians
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  • kropotkinkropotkin Mr London UKRegistered User regular
    edited June 2008
    MaoChan wrote: »
    Oh, before you get here, it is a very good idea to find out where the nearest consulate for your home nation is. Since we are talking Seattle, most major nations have a consulate in town.

    For most people, this won't be needed unless they are looking to start shit. I've been to plenty of countries and you go, show up, have a good time, and then leave. Really here is the ultimate tip:

    Don't do whatever is illegal in your country in our country and follow everyone else. CONFORM!!

    I think that knowing where your consulate is could be regarded as taking things a little too far. Now if I was going to somewhere dangerous then yes knowing where your home nation is represented is a good thing. However I don't think Seattle is particularly dangerous so I'm going to uphold what MaoChan has said. In other words, don't be a muppet whilst at PAX please. Remember you're flying the flag of both your nation and of gaming kind...

  • BlamemonkeyBlamemonkey Registered User
    edited June 2008
    Also don't forget to Tip and sales tax....

    can a local please add the relevant percentages...

  • BlamemonkeyBlamemonkey Registered User
    edited June 2008
    kropotkin wrote: »
    International Travellers Guide to PAX

    1) Check your Passport and visa requirement.
    YES IGNORANCE IS NOT A DEFENCE
    I also recommend if your government has a travel registry is it a good idea to register
    Aussies - http://www.smarttraveler.gov.au/
    Also at immigration you are required to provide contact details while you are in the USA so insure you have an address of where you are staying and a contact number.
    kropotkin wrote: »
    2) Travel Insurance

    YES DO IT!! make sure you read the fine print of your insurance docs and make sure you have a copy that you can access easily!
    kropotkin wrote: »
    3) Money
    Travellers Checks are crap I recommend seeing you you can get a Visa debit card, which provides you with the international access of VISA but you don't go into debt.

    also CASH PASSPORTS ARE AWESOME!!! bear in mind that you can only use them at ATMs when you get them you are provided with two cards which are unmarked so if you lose them your money is safe, but be aware topping them up via internet banking can take some time.
    kropotkin wrote: »
    4) Mobile AKA 'Cell' Phones
    I had no problem getting a sim both times i have been to the states, go pre paid and if you are hanging with a bunch of buds see if you can get on the same network because you can usually get free or cheaper calls between the mobiles. Also you can be charged if you make and receive calls or SMSs so be aware of that.

    kropotkin wrote: »
    5) Travel
    when charging DS or laptops keep a keen eye out around airports because you should be able to find an unused power point to make sure your device is 100% charged!
    kropotkin wrote: »
    6) Reading material
    Good call!
    kropotkin wrote: »
    7) Accent

    /me Adds kropotkin to the list!

    the accent is golden, just don't take to much advantage of it, several times i have been asked if I have some free time to read the phone book to people.
    kropotkin wrote: »
    8) Power

    This is a great idea make sure you get the adaptor before you get to the airport because you will probably save a couple of bucks and make sure you read the requirements of all your devices, your Laptop maybe fine but what about you mobile phone etc...
    kropotkin wrote: »
    9) Drinking and ID

    unfortunately the only accepted form is your passport, I don't feel comfortable going out drinking with the only document that can get me back to my country, so I recommend trying your luck with your Drivers license I only got turned away once at the a Red Robin, numerous Bars and clubs i went to did not have a problem with my drivers license.... but then again I am 27....
    kropotkin wrote: »
    11) Units

    Also capsicum is call peppers, Jugs are Pitchers, Mobile phones are called Cell phones, Petrol is Gas, Bud is not beer, cilantro is American for coriander.
    kropotkin wrote: »
    12) Party

    Sweet keep me informed!
    kropotkin wrote: »
    13) Drivers License

    Public transport FTW!!!

  • TransparentTransparent Registered User
    edited June 2008
    Coriander is the seed. Cilantro is the leaf. How do you make the distinction overseas?

    Also, I did some research, and Seattle is apparently a city known to treat jaywalking as an infraction (non criminal, so not even a misdemeanor) if you step onto a controlled intersection after the don't walk sign starts flashing. No criminal charges, but a $60ish citation. It does become a criminal offense if the police believe that you stepped into the street with the intent to impede traffic. Yes, in Washington the police can search you and take you to the station for making a car slow down so you can cross the street. I read articles about the occasional crackdown in the downtown area. In the US you better believe that if enforcing this law is profitable the police will hand out tickets. Here's a blog entry of some teacher bitching about it.

    PAXtrain '10, let's do this!
  • netcrusher88netcrusher88 Registered User
    edited June 2008
    Capsicum are bell peppers, at least the big multicolored mild ones. Smaller ones have different names (generally Spanish) because we actually use them enough in our food to differentiate them. :twisted: Props to our neighbors to the south for that. Most of the other linguistic stuff is minor, most people here know what petrol is and will figure out that if you ask for a jug of beer you want a pitcher of beer. Hell, half of us are just as likely to say jug. Just make sure you specify a beer, you know what Monty Python said about American beer. You'll find some quality local microbrews if you look though.

    Also we kind of understand liters, at least insofar as soda has come in 2-liter bottles for decades and 1-liter is becoming increasingly popular. Also various other drinks are frequently measured in milliliters. Just give up on other measurements. Text 46645 for conversions ("5 km in miles") if you picked up a US prepaid phone or SIM - just remember it uses up your credits.

    Re: the money. At least we have different colors now. And don't worry about $2 bills and large denomination coin, not only do people look at you funny if you try to use them, nobody even tries because they're a pain in the ass to get a hold of short of flying to DC and buying them from the mint. Except certain recent versions of the dollar coin - you'll see some of the 2000 (2001?) Liberty dollars or 2007(?) Susan B. Anthony dollars in circulation if you look hard enough.

    Sales tax is ~8.9% (just call it 10 to estimate) and applies to most goods and services, but some vendors in the expo hall might waive it if you pay cash. There are additional taxes on certain items (cigarettes come to mind) but they're usually included in the advertised price. Most packaged foods are tax-exempt (specifically those that do not require work on the part of store employees to prepare, usually) but carbonated drinks are not.

    The standard amount for a tip is 15%, although some people choose to set their baseline at 20%. These aren't hard numbers, feel free to vary them based on the quality of service you think you got. Most fast food chains don't allow their employees to accept tips, and tips are never expected at those that do, pizza delivery being a notable exception (no, the delivery fee is NOT a goddamn tip), and even then it's not a percentage thing. It is standard practice to add a 7-17% "gratuity" or "service fee" to parties over a certain size (generally 8-10 depending on the restaurant), which really means "mandatory tip". Go ahead and treat that as part of your tip, but go for a number higher than you would - another 2-5% on top of that, at least - because it's split more ways (tips are usually shared with assisting wait staff and bus-people), and a lot more work to serve large parties.

    tl;dr: If you are served, tip 15%. If the service is exceptional, tip over 20%. If it's not... your call, but not tipping shitlists you. 10% or so. ALWAYS TIP THE PIZZA DELIVERY GUY. THAT GOES FOR YOU TOO, AMERICANS

    >.> I've been the pizza delivery guy. The delivery fee doesn't even cover fuel.

    My Visa card got stolen the other day. Now it's everywhere I want to be.
  • BlamemonkeyBlamemonkey Registered User
    edited June 2008
    Coriander is the seed. Cilantro is the leaf. How do you make the distinction overseas?

    Coriander = leaf

    Coriander seeds = seed
    Capsicum are bell peppers, at least the big multicolored mild ones. Smaller ones have different names (generally Spanish) because we actually use them enough in our food to differentiate them. :twisted:

    what about chilli's?

  • netcrusher88netcrusher88 Registered User
    edited June 2008
    Chili peppers!

    Yeah, you got me. They generally wind up thrown together, diced, and put in chili anyway. Mmm, chili.

    My Visa card got stolen the other day. Now it's everywhere I want to be.
  • BlamemonkeyBlamemonkey Registered User
    edited June 2008
    Oh also if you go to a restaurant and order a burger they will ask how you want it cooked
    eg Rare - well done

  • GeneralsGenerals Registered User
    edited June 2008
    Wikipedia's summary for Visa Waiver

    So unfortunately, anyone with a Greek passport WILL require a visa to get into PAX, if there is ever any Greek attendees for PAX.

    And also to cite another important info from wiki:

    Applicants for admission under the visa waiver program: (Can someone help me with point format?)

    - Must have complied with the conditions of all previous admissions to the U.S.
    - Must never have been arrested or convicted for an offence or crime involving moral turpitude or crimes with a maximum aggregate sentence of 5 years' imprisonment or more, no matter how long ago. National regulations which normally expunge criminal records after a certain length of time (e.g. The Rehabilitation of Offenders Act in the UK) do not apply.
    - Must not be ineligible for a visa;
    - Must not have been previously denied entry to the U.S. in the past five years;
    - Must not be intending to visit the U.S. for a purpose other than tourism or a short term business visit. In particular, journalists cannot use the visa waiver scheme to operate in the U.S. and must instead apply for an I visa.
    - If entering over the land frontier, must pay a fee of $6. For those arriving by air or sea, the cost of the visa waiver is included in the airline ticket.

    Those who do not meet the requirements for the visa-waiver scheme must obtain a U.S. tourist visa from an American Embassy or Consulate.

    Check the external links and references for more info and if anyone needs to be sure.

    jsn: and there was some dude(note that: DUDE) dressed up as Mai from KOF
    Jeff: I see
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    jsn: friend was like "DUDE he's BEHIND YOU"
  • ASimPersonASimPerson And protect them from the evils of the world like trigonometry and prime numbers.Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    Wikitravel's guide to tipping: http://wikitravel.org/en/United_States#Tipping

    The rest of the article is decent as well.

    Let's what, else can I think of....
    1) In the US, the term "chili" refers to either a stew or the specific Chili pepper. Peppers are a generic term for what some folks would call "chiles".
    2) Eh, screw it. Wikipedia's got this one covered.

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  • kropotkinkropotkin Mr London UKRegistered User regular
    edited June 2008
    All excellent pieces of input. I'll address each item in the original post. Here is my take on some of the items raised:

    1) Language - Not something I wished to raise, especially after my remarks on food availability. However some common phrases used in the UK can cause offense in the US and vice versa. Examples include:

    * Rubber - A pencil eraser in the UK, a prophylactic in the US! Please never ask to 'borrow a rubber' as it could cause some confusion!

    * Cockney Rhyming Slang - Any variances of cockney rhyming slang such as 'Butchers', 'Giraffe', 'Ruby Murray' and 'Gone Pete' are surprisingly well known beyond the fringes of the East End of London. Nevertheless they should be used sparingly.

    * Colonial Cousins - The collective noun for those that reside in the US. Again not really welcomed expecially since that little spat we had with the former colonies in the late 1700's.

    * Megadrive - Called the Genesis in the US for reasons best known to SEGA. There was a rumour that the Mega CD was to be called 'The Book of Revelations' at one point but that was abandonned in favour of 'Sega CD'. The 32x goes by the same name in both the UK and US where it is also known as 'SEGA's folly'.

    * Off-License AKA 'Offy' - Known as Liquor Stores in the US.

    * Chemist - UK equivalent to Drug Store.

    * Bog/Carsey - Known as the 'bathroom' or 'rest room' in the US.

    * Bum Bag - UK equivalent to 'Fanny Pack'. In the UK the word 'Fanny' has a very different meaning that I will not state here for fear of being banned but it is enough to change the name of the item.

    * Hole-in-the-wall - The UK's odd ball name for an ATM.

    * 'Knocked For Six' - Meaning shocked and stunned. Comes from a cricketing term relating to the highest score you can get by hitting a ball out of bounds. Could be described as cricket's equivalent to a home run in baseball.

    *Draughts - The name given to 'Checkers' in the UK.

    For more of these you can check the Wiki page that has a very long list of words that have differing meanings on both sides of the Atlantic:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_words_having_different_meanings_in_British_and_American_English


    2) Money - The negative feedback I have got from the use of Travellers Cheques has raised some serious concerns so I'm going to do some more research into how cash should be handled in the US. Thanks for everyone's feedback on this.

    3) Tipping and VAT - Excellent advice here and something we Europeans are amazingly bad at. I'll add this to the original post.

    Thanks all for the feedback. I'll continue to update the original post to reflect these pieces of advice. Any more would be greatly appreciated.

  • netcrusher88netcrusher88 Registered User
    edited June 2008
    Wanted to throw in some additional local tips and extra stuff regarding the wikitravel page.

    In Seattle, you'd be hard-pressed to find a restaurant that would not allow you to eat there without a suit, or a shirt and tie - a solid-color button-down shirt or even a polo shirt will suffice nearly anywhere. T-shirts might get you odd looks at some places, but I haven't been able to find any such places and they're certainly not going to block you from entry.

    As wikitravel says, should you need to use it, the emergency number here is 911. It's usually in large print on payphones too, if you can find one of them. If you're renting a SIM card or have a prepaid one (this may not work with phones that aren't GSM), you can also dial 112 on your phone if that's what you're more used to - they do the same thing and it's part of the GSM spec.

    Read the Respect section. Most of it is probably nothing new to you, but still. We're big on respect in a very strange way.

    My Visa card got stolen the other day. Now it's everywhere I want to be.
  • LigerLiger Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    kropotkin wrote: »
    * Colonial Cousins - The collective noun for those that reside in the US. Again not really welcomed expecially since that little spat we had with the former colonies in the late 1700's.

    Did someone really think you were insulting them? Must've had a short temper.

    Most Seattle locals will either laugh at that term or be confused by it, especially considering WA was never a colony. :P

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  • kropotkinkropotkin Mr London UKRegistered User regular
    edited June 2008
    Liger wrote: »
    kropotkin wrote: »
    * Colonial Cousins - The collective noun for those that reside in the US. Again not really welcomed expecially since that little spat we had with the former colonies in the late 1700's.

    Did someone really think you were insulting them? Must've had a short temper.

    Most Seattle locals will either laugh at that term or be confused by it, especially considering WA was never a colony. :P

    Think nothing of it. 'Tis just my attempt at humour really although many in the UK do still refer to the US as 'the Colonies'. It's either that or they're Battlestar Galactica fans.

    In response to the post by netcrusher88. Yes the 911 is a good point to raise as dialling 999 won't get you anywhere. There is also the tiny issue of no telephone numbers in the US that begin with a '0' when all UK numbers do. I'll also scan through the Wikitravel page to get an more useful advice.

  • life3life3 Registered User
    edited June 2008
    I had no idea jaywalking was enforced anywhere in the United States. Growing up you hear the one story of someone's cousin's-brother's-girlfriend's-uncle getting a ticket for jaywalking. It's brushed off as an old-wives tale that such a thing would ever happen.

    I thought it was ridiculous to put it in the OP, but after some google, it seems like other parts of the country(i.e. not the North East) are much more strict.

    Good info for cross-coast travelers as well!

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  • ElectricTurtleElectricTurtle Registered User
    edited June 2008
    I once crossed against a signal right in front of a LEO (Law Enforcement Officer) and he gave me a dirty look and a warning. That's as much as has ever happened to me.

    Spoiler:
  • LigerLiger Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    kropotkin wrote: »
    Liger wrote: »
    kropotkin wrote: »
    * Colonial Cousins - The collective noun for those that reside in the US. Again not really welcomed expecially since that little spat we had with the former colonies in the late 1700's.

    Did someone really think you were insulting them? Must've had a short temper.

    Most Seattle locals will either laugh at that term or be confused by it, especially considering WA was never a colony. :P

    Think nothing of it. 'Tis just my attempt at humour really although many in the UK do still refer to the US as 'the Colonies'. It's either that or they're Battlestar Galactica fans.

    I actually called myself a colonial when I visited Ireland. I met some English tourists in a pub. We exchanged pleasantries (nice to meet you, where're you from, etc.) and they LOL'd when I said I came back from the colonies.

    ...my iTunes shuffle just started playing The Orange and The Green. Is this awesome? Y/N :D

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  • TransparentTransparent Registered User
    edited June 2008
    Y - Awesome

    PAXtrain '10, let's do this!
  • kropotkinkropotkin Mr London UKRegistered User regular
    edited June 2008
    I've amended the section on money on the original post to eliminate all references to travellers cheques as they appear to be a thing of the past. If there is anything else people wish to have details on please post here.

  • kropotkinkropotkin Mr London UKRegistered User regular
    edited July 2008
    This is a bump post to ensure this thread stays on the front page. If anyone has any more tips for international travellers going to PAX '08 then please post them here and I'll add them to the OP.

  • Sl1pstreamSl1pstream [E] BelgiumRegistered User regular
    edited July 2008
    I'd like to point out that I didn't have any problems at all last year, even as someone who's native language isn't English. Except for those two hours at JFK. I hate that airport.

  • kropotkinkropotkin Mr London UKRegistered User regular
    edited July 2008
    Sl1pstream wrote: »
    I'd like to point out that I didn't have any problems at all last year, even as someone who's native language isn't English. Except for those two hours at JFK. I hate that airport.

    Thankfully I'm not flying in through there as I'm taking a direct flight from London to Seattle. Sl1pstream...name rings a bell...same Sl1pstream from EvAv?

  • kropotkinkropotkin Mr London UKRegistered User regular
    edited July 2008
    Bump post! If you're travelling to PAX from beyond North America you'd be wise to read this post!

  • Queen BrewerQueen Brewer Registered User
    edited July 2008
    I jaywalk constantly in Seattle and have never gotten a ticket. My Mom has been cited twice when she wasn't jaywalking, though she was able to get both tickets invalidated. I think as long as you don't jaywalk directly in front of a cop on duty (and even then you probably will be fine) you won't get a ticket.

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    <Moe_Fwacky> nice girls
    <Moe_Fwacky> lesbians
    <Moe_Fwacky> robbed drugstores together
  • kropotkinkropotkin Mr London UKRegistered User regular
    edited July 2008
    Bumpety bumpy boo bumpety bump bump BUUUUUMP!

    *BLING* Achievement Unlocked! 50 Pts 'Thread Bumper Extrodinaire'

  • kropotkinkropotkin Mr London UKRegistered User regular
    edited July 2008
    Bumpety bumpy boo bumpety bump bump BUUUUUMP!

    *BLING* Achievement Unlocked! 50 Pts 'Thread Bumper Extrodinaire' +1

  • kropotkinkropotkin Mr London UKRegistered User regular
    edited July 2008
    I seem to have dropped from the front page again! BAH! Here I be bumping me back.

  • Sl1pstreamSl1pstream [E] BelgiumRegistered User regular
    edited July 2008
    ASimPerson wrote: »
    Belgian frites

    <3

    Frieten ftw.

    Also, yes to the EvAv question.

  • CuZZaCuZZa Khoo's Epic Mount Perth, AustraliaRegistered User regular
    edited July 2008
    Anyone know much about mobile/cell phones over there? Getting a sim and that to make calls isn't too hard but I'm one of those difficult ones from Australia who has had the luxury of mobile data and SMS over GSM/EDGE/3G. How hard is it to get a pre-paid sim to use in a phone so I can twitter freely at PAX over wireless data?

  • Queen BrewerQueen Brewer Registered User
    edited July 2008
    CuZZa wrote: »
    Anyone know much about mobile/cell phones over there? Getting a sim and that to make calls isn't too hard but I'm one of those difficult ones from Australia who has had the luxury of mobile data and SMS over GSM/EDGE/3G. How hard is it to get a pre-paid sim to use in a phone so I can twitter freely at PAX over wireless data?

    AT&T GoPhone is a pretty solid pay-as-you-go plan here. They charge 0.10 per minute and 1.00 per day you make a call, or 0.25 per minute with no daily use fee. Their data is billed at 1 cent / KB, which is steep, but if you're only using it for mobile twitter, that should be fine, right? Probably cheaper than the 15 cents they charge per text. What frequencies does your phone use?

    <Moe_Fwacky> once i had next door neighbors
    <Moe_Fwacky> nice girls
    <Moe_Fwacky> lesbians
    <Moe_Fwacky> robbed drugstores together
  • CuZZaCuZZa Khoo's Epic Mount Perth, AustraliaRegistered User regular
    edited July 2008
    I have a Nokia N95 8Gb, the non-US version so the only thing it is missing is the 850Mhz WCDMA which is apparently the main 3G band for you guys. But GSM/GPRS (1900Mhz) will do me fine, it's only twitter text, not like I'm trying to download. Looking around, what of T-Mobile?

    I'm also hoping to use this in the other cities I visit (Houston, Chicago, Champaign IL, Milwaukee and San Francisco.

  • MaoChanMaoChan Registered User regular
    edited July 2008
    CuZZa wrote: »
    I have a Nokia N95 8Gb, the non-US version so the only thing it is missing is the 850Mhz WCDMA which is apparently the main 3G band for you guys. But GSM/GPRS (1900Mhz) will do me fine, it's only twitter text, not like I'm trying to download. Looking around, what of T-Mobile?

    I'm also hoping to use this in the other cities I visit (Houston, Chicago, Champaign IL, Milwaukee and San Francisco.

    Def just get a T-Mobile sim. They are cheap 10 cents a minute, txt is cheap too. If you claim it is for a Sidekick then your $1 a day activating fee will get you unlimited txt msg and internet.

  • ASimPersonASimPerson And protect them from the evils of the world like trigonometry and prime numbers.Registered User regular
    edited July 2008
    CuZZa wrote: »
    Anyone know much about mobile/cell phones over there? Getting a sim and that to make calls isn't too hard but I'm one of those difficult ones from Australia who has had the luxury of mobile data and SMS over GSM/EDGE/3G. How hard is it to get a pre-paid sim to use in a phone so I can twitter freely at PAX over wireless data?

    You may have a hard time getting just the SIM card, but I've seen the various pre-paid phones just sitting around in various stores, even like grocery stores. You'll need to get one from one of the US's two GSM providers (AT&T and T-Mobile).

    I have the latter and it works pretty well for me.

    Also, it should work in any major populated area of the US. Each provider has maps of their coverage areas on their website.

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  • TransparentTransparent Registered User
    edited July 2008
    I only know AT&T. It's one cent per K for a standard pay as you go account, they also offer another type of prepay called "pick your plan" where you basically pay for a month of standard service ahead of time. Voice rates range from $30 to $70 depending on the number of minutes you purchase, and the data plans are as follows:

    Package Charge MB Included Overage Rate
    MEdiaTM Net 1 MB $4.99 per month 1 MB $0.01 per KB
    MEdiaTM Net 5 MB $9.99 per month 5 MB $0.01 per KB
    MEdiaTM Net 10 MB $14.99 per month 10 MB $0.01 per KB
    MEdiaTM Net Unlimited $19.99 per month Unlimited N/A
    MEdiaTM Net Pay-Per-Use $0.00 per month 0 MB $0.01 per KB

    http://www.wireless.att.com/cell-phone-service/cell-phone-plans/pyp-cell-phone-plans.jsp?wtSlotClick=1-00166N-0-1&WT.svl=calltoaction

    PAXtrain '10, let's do this!
  • kropotkinkropotkin Mr London UKRegistered User regular
    edited July 2008
2
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