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Foods that are easy on the stomach?

UnknownSaintUnknownSaint Registered User
edited July 2008 in Help / Advice Forum
So lately I've been having some stomach issues that are being looked into, awaiting a lot of test results so any 'go to the doctor' advice won't be necessary. I hardly feel like eating and always feel slightly neaseous, so all I've been living on for the past few days has been saltines, applesauce, and the random bowl of soup.

Can anyone give me some more ideas for light foods that won't unsettle my stomach? I'm not exactly on my deathbed or anything, but my diet is pretty limited at the moment and I'm just about over crackers. Please no caffeine, dairy, or chocolate reccomendations.

UnknownSaint on

Posts

  • Regina FongRegina Fong Allons-y, Alonso Registered User regular
    edited July 2008
    When my grandma was pregnant with the twins (my aunts) she could hardly keep anything down at all, the doctor was extremely worried for her and the babies. Ultimately she found one thing that she could always manage to keep down: sweet potatoes. And she lived off them and not too much else for damn near 8 months.

    Boil or bake them, you can add a bit of butter, salt and pepper, brown sugar or honey depending on your taste and what you think your stomach can handle.

  • Fuzzy Cumulonimbus CloudFuzzy Cumulonimbus Cloud Registered User regular
    edited July 2008
  • deadonthestreetdeadonthestreet Registered User regular
    edited July 2008
  • Regina FongRegina Fong Allons-y, Alonso Registered User regular
    edited July 2008
    Oatmeal could work.

    The real stuff though. The shit that comes in little packets is riddled with sugar and sodium, not especially nutritious, and probably not easy on a troubled gut.

    -edit-

    And ironically, the prep/cook time difference between real oatmeal and instant oatmeal is nowhere near enough to justify using the instant stuff.

  • RUNN1NGMANRUNN1NGMAN Registered User regular
    edited July 2008
    Ginger is a natural stomach calmer--you obviously can't live off the stuff but you can drink ginger tea, and lots of pregnant women get ginger gum off the internet or at asian markets for their morning sickness. Stay away from greasy or oily foods like fried food, peanut butter, pizza--starches and lean protein without a lot of seasoning is probably going to be your best bet until you figure out what's wrong. I see lots of mashed potatoes and chicken in your future! The sweet potato suggestion about is good too. Steamed veggies should be ok.

  • Bewildered_RoninBewildered_Ronin Registered User regular
    edited July 2008
    Tofu. I know the stereotype is of tofu being bland mush, but it doesn't have to be. The great thing about tofu is that it is pretty inert with little initial flavor. (except for fresh tofu which has a creamy quality to it and definite protein tones) Tofu also has a variety of firmness to it, so it can be used in a variety of ways. The lack of substantial flavoring allows you to manipulate it to suit whatever dish it is being used in.

    For example, I used to make really strong mint tea and soak extra firm tofu in it for 24 hours. (you can do more if you wish, but you should dry it after 24 hours and then re-marinate it to prevent it from braking apart into mush)

    I would then prepare a beef broth (vegetable broth can certainly be used) and would add shitake mushrooms and diced white onion (I do large chunks).

    Bring to a boil until both are reasonably cooked. (onion should be translucent, ie: semi-white. you do not want it to be transparent, as they will be too mushy. take care with the mushrooms, as you don't want them to turn into mush either)

    The tofu is added immediately after the soup is removed from heat and the dish is garnished whit finely chopped scallions. If you desire starch, any soup-friendy noodle can be used, such as udon. The mint adds a wonderfully subtle tone to the beef broth that is pronounced by the fresh scallions and white onion.

    BTW, the firmest tofu is sometimes referred to as Western firm. Asian firm is medium and soft tofu is sometimes called "silken". The differences in firmness can be used to accompany any dish. For example, spicy silken tofu with eggs and cheese.

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  • Regina FongRegina Fong Allons-y, Alonso Registered User regular
    edited July 2008
    I'm not a huge fan of tofu myself. My suggestion for adding some bulk to a broth type soup is barley, which can be either an interesting contrast with noodles, or used by itself.

  • Bewildered_RoninBewildered_Ronin Registered User regular
    edited July 2008
    Yeah, many people hate tofu. It gets a really bad rep mainly because 1) hippies 2) righteous vegetarians (hippies) 3) vegans (hippies) and 4) most people don't put it to good use in their cooking (hippies). Barley is an excellent idea and it's really good for you.

    Ginger is a wonderful idea too. And don't just think gingerale. It's in lots of stuff and/or can be incorporated into foods. Broths, marinades, cookies, breads, ice cream, smoothies and tons of other things. Don't knock the ginger ice cream till you try it. It's actually quite good.

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  • MonoxideMonoxide Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited July 2008
    Not that the suggestions in this thread aren't okay, but you'll probably have to wait for your doctor to make a diagnosis before really finding what will and won't bother you. And even then, he might not be right in his suggestions. You just have to try things and see what works for you.

  • chromdomchromdom That Guy Go Cows!Registered User regular
    edited July 2008
    I suggest plain pasta. No cheese or sauce on it, maybe a wider noodle. If you can hang with it, maybe a little butter or olive oil, but that's a big maybe. Salt and pepper if you need some flavor, that shouldn't be too bad.

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  • mtsmts Registered User regular
    edited July 2008
    you can always do white rice, add some stuff to it if you think you can handle it.

    what about boiled chicken?

    i would be wary of tofu. a lot of people don;t have the enzyme to digest it and if you don't you can easily have more stomach issues

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  • AmphetamineAmphetamine Registered User regular
    edited July 2008
    Bananas, rice, apple juice, apples, granola bars, eggs, toast, peanut butter.

    I've been suffering from gastritis/acid reflux for about 4 months now and those things help greatly when my stomach is feeling shitty.

    Stay away from milk for sure as that promotes acid secretion.

  • DeathPrawnDeathPrawn Registered User
    edited July 2008
    Although each of these has been mentioned individually, I'm a fan of the classic "BRAT" diet: bananas, rice, applesauce, toast. Rice pudding is also good - go buy some Kozy Shack (EDIT: sorry, didn't see the no dairy bit). I know you've had some soup, but if there's a good Jewish deli nearby you should try some matzo ball soup, also known as 'Jewish penicillin'.

    It may just be me with my particularly sensitive stomach, but I find that staying away from products made with corn syrup helps.

    The suggestion of ginger ale is a decent one, but you have to be careful. Most ginger ales these days don't actually contain any ginger. If it doesn't have any ginger, then as far as your stomach is concerned you are just drinking fizzy sugar-water, which isn't particularly good for it. For me, it's actually bad, since a mass-produced ginger ale without any real ginger will undoubtedly be made with corn syrup.

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  • GeneralChaosGeneralChaos Registered User
    edited July 2008
    I've always had luck with bagels, white bread, and club soda/gingerale/sprite.

  • VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User regular
    edited July 2008
    My doctor always says BRAT: bananas, rice, apples, toast.

  • NimaNima Registered User
    edited July 2008
    When I'm ill the only thing I can stomach is ice lollies (popsicles).
    The sugar content in most ice lollies on sale might be bad for your stomach, so you could juice some fruit and freeze it in molds. That way you'd be getting some nutrients too.

  • B:LB:L Registered User regular
    edited July 2008
    Well you already went to the doctor, but just make sure that they tested for Celiac's Disease when you get your results back.

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  • UnknownSaintUnknownSaint Registered User
    edited July 2008
    Thanks for the advice everyone, been quite helpful.

  • Aurora BorealisAurora Borealis Registered User regular
    edited July 2008
    I live in a predominately west indian neighborhood, it is easy to get real imported jamaican ginger beer here. And that stuff is Good, you can taste the ginger so hard it'll singe the back of your throat if you're not used to it. Best stuff for a stomach ache ever.
    Another good one I've seen is the Reed's Ginger Brew- you can probably find it at like a more upper scale market- here in the city it's in most of the bodegas too. Actual ginger, not as hard on the throat, sweetened with cane sugar and juice, no corn syrup. Comes in nice green bottles so it look like beer, which gets me made fun of for 'drinking' at work. And if you can find them, their other flavors are excellent too. I am fond of the raspberry, and the apple cider knocks my socks off.
    I find that I love potato bread when I am having stomach problems. It's a little sweeter than normal bread so it goes down easier, but it also feels like I am eating something good and solid.

  • UnderdogUnderdog Registered User regular
    edited July 2008
    If you do rice, add half as much water as you normally would. You'll get a more soupy consistency and the rice will be mushier, easier on your stomach. It'll be reminiscent of congee and you can toss whatever you want in with it.

    Edit: Rousong is a good choice to make the congee appetizing. This is usually what I'm reduced to eating when I've got the flu and I need to take it easy on my stomach.

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  • BetelguesePDXBetelguesePDX Registered User
    edited July 2008
    The BRAT diet: Bananas, rice, applesauce, toast.

  • mtsmts Registered User regular
    edited July 2008
    if you want soupier rice you need more water

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  • UnderdogUnderdog Registered User regular
    edited July 2008
    mts wrote: »
    if you want soupier rice you need more water

    Yeah what I meant was add 150% the usual amount of water. Or even twice as much.

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