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MLA Citation question - Solved!

thanimationsthanimations Registered User regular
edited November 2008 in Help / Advice Forum
So I'm trying to cite something for an essay and realized I wasn't sure how to do it. Yes, I have an MLA handbook, but I'm not sure the classification.

I'm citing the essay "Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema" by Laura Mulvey. I found it online at Brown University's website here. Should I just do it like so:

Mulvey, Laura. “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema.” Brown U, 17 Jan. 2007. Web. 29 Oct. 2008. https://wiki.brown.edu/confluence/x/dD4

Or should I cite the original source, which is Screen magazine?

thanimations on

Posts

  • Iceman.USAFIceman.USAF Captain East CoastRegistered User regular
    edited November 2008
    If you've gone and read/looked up the original source, there's no reason to use the magazine.

    That being said, there are online programs (as well as word itself) which will format this for you. You simply pick the format and input the data and BAM done.



  • thanimationsthanimations Registered User regular
    edited November 2008
    If you've gone and read/looked up the original source, there's no reason to use the magazine.

    That being said, there are online programs (as well as word itself) which will format this for you. You simply pick the format and input the data and BAM done.

    I've never read the original source and I don't think the original Screen magazine exists anymore. My main problem is I'm not sure what to classify this as. Since it's apart of Brown U's wiki, would it be "an online scholarly project?" Or "news group or other type of online forum?" Or maybe it's simply "an online version of print periodical?" Unfortunately this source seems to fall in a dead zone between all of them. Or maybe I'm just worrying too much.

  • LoveIsUnityLoveIsUnity Registered User regular
    edited November 2008
    If you've gone and read/looked up the original source, there's no reason to use the magazine.

    That being said, there are online programs (as well as word itself) which will format this for you. You simply pick the format and input the data and BAM done.

    Please, for the love of all that is good in this world, do not rely on Word or any other program to format your citations for you. My students do this, and it bites them in the ass all the time. Also, except in exceptional cases (like this one) it takes like 2 minutes to properly type a citation.

    I'm assuming that you're not writing this for publication, correct? If you are writing with the intent to publish, you should probably bite the bullet and find a copy of the original. It will help you with pagination, which the online link you provided doesn't give. (You don't know where page 6 ends and 7 begins, etc...)

    Anyway, if you're just writing this for a class, the citation should look like this:

    Mulvey, Laura. "Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema." Screen 16.3 Autumn 1975: 6-18. Database Name. Service Name. Library Name, City, State. 1 Nov. 2008. <https://wiki.brown.edu/confluence/display/MarkTribe/Visual+Pleasure+and+Narrative+Cinema>.

    Obviously, you'll need to indent every line after the first of the citation.

    I'll let you fill in the database name, service name, and library info. The OWL at Purdue (http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/) is really good for MLA questions, and sometimes easier to navigate than the MLA guide, which includes a lot of (mostly) useless information in the first four or five chapters.

    sig.gif
  • shugaraeshugarae Registered User regular
    edited November 2008
    I would classify it as "a newspaper or magazine article on the internet"

    Something like this?:
    Mulvey, Laura. “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema.” Screen. 1975: 6-18. Brown U. Web. 29 Oct. 2008. https://wiki.brown.edu/confluence/x/dD4

    It's been a long time since I've used MLA since my current college is obsessed with APA D:

    Omeganaut class of '08. Fuck Peggle.
    The Best in Terms of Pants on JCCC3
  • thanimationsthanimations Registered User regular
    edited November 2008
    If you've gone and read/looked up the original source, there's no reason to use the magazine.

    That being said, there are online programs (as well as word itself) which will format this for you. You simply pick the format and input the data and BAM done.

    Please, for the love of all that is good in this world, do not rely on Word or any other program to format your citations for you. My students do this, and it bites them in the ass all the time. Also, except in exceptional cases (like this one) it takes like 2 minutes to properly type a citation.

    I'm assuming that you're not writing this for publication, correct? If you are writing with the intent to publish, you should probably bite the bullet and find a copy of the original. It will help you with pagination, which the online link you provided doesn't give. (You don't know where page 6 ends and 7 begins, etc...)

    Anyway, if you're just writing this for a class, the citation should look like this:

    Mulvey, Laura. "Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema." Screen 16.3 Autumn 1975: 6-18. Database Name. Service Name. Library Name, City, State. 1 Nov. 2008. <https://wiki.brown.edu/confluence/display/MarkTribe/Visual+Pleasure+and+Narrative+Cinema>.

    Obviously, you'll need to indent every line after the first of the citation.

    I'll let you fill in the database name, service name, and library info. The OWL at Purdue (http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/) is really good for MLA questions, and sometimes easier to navigate than the MLA guide, which includes a lot of (mostly) useless information in the first four or five chapters.

    Excellent, thanks for the help and the website!

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