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Car essentials

QorzmQorzm Registered User regular
edited November 2006 in Help / Advice Forum
I just got my first car (used Honda Accord EX) and I was wondering what the next step is.

I'm getting an alarm put in, new cell phone/DS chargers, and a few scratches fixed. I need something to play my iPod with. I've seen those cassette tape things with a cord-to-iPod, and I've also seen some docks that use suction-cup technology. Any advice for those?

What else are essentials for cars? Spare waters, maybe a swiss army knife, books, I honestly don't know.

If anyone could help me out, it would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!

edit: reminder to self: regular batteries

Qorzm on
«1

Posts

  • GafotoGafoto Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Jumper Cables are a must (and the ability to use them correctly).

    Some of that tire in a can stuff that will make your tire go for a few more miles even when it's flat.

    Make sure you've got a good jack / spare.

    An RPG.

    sierracrest.jpg
  • FaricazyFaricazy Registered User
    edited November 2006
    Flashlight.

    You got all the tools that came with it to change your tires?

  • ComahawkComahawk Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Anti-freeze and washer fluid... 1 gallon bottles of each.


    Tire pressue check is also a good plan, pad of paper and pen in the glove box, if you get snow or frost, a windshield scraper.

    A quart of oil might not be a bad plan either, and a blanket.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • drxand?drxand? Registered User
    edited November 2006
    a mini first aid kit couldnt hurt, you never know when you'd need it

    as for the ipod- if you're using a stock headunit (cassette/cd player) then you can choose from the cassette option or piping it through a radio signal - if you have an aftermarket cdplayer that has an av/out input you can hook up the ipod straight to that for the best sound

  • FaricazyFaricazy Registered User
    edited November 2006
    Comahawk wrote:
    Anti-freeze and washer fluid... 1 gallon bottles of each.


    Tire pressue check is also a good plan, pad of paper and pen in the glove box, if you get snow or frost, a windshield scraper.

    A quart of oil might not be a bad plan either, and a blanket.
    Oh yeah, definitely a tire-pressure checker. Don't get an electronic one - get either a simple pen-shaped one that has the plastic tab sticking out to show pressure, or a nice big round gauge one. Electronic ones are a pain to use.

    Also, a roll or two of paper towels.

  • n1t0n1t0 Registered User
    edited November 2006
    1 gallon potable water.
    1 can of foam bear repellant
    1 full change of clothes and trashbag
    1 wig and fake facial hair set
    1 multitool
    1 bag of dried banana chips
    1 bag of beef jerky
    1 mini shovel
    1 stuffed animal
    1 role of toilet paper.

    This all fits pretty nicely inside my scion TC.

    n1t0.gif
  • MishraMishra Registered User
    edited November 2006
    Depending how old the car is buy the haynes guide for it. It'll save you some money by showing how to do simple things like change the headlight bulbs or oil. If your really daring they'll even show more complicated stuff like changing the suspension.

    "Give a man a fire, he's warm for the night. Set a man on fire he's warm for the rest of his life."
    -Terry Pratchett
  • ALockslyALocksly Registered User
    edited November 2006
    All of the above is good but I would add:

    small fire extinguisher

    A jump-pack; jumpstart yourself battery pack. This has saved me numerous times and when you need to jump someone else it's easier to grab your jump-pack than trying to jocky cars close enough for cables.
    keep your cables though.

    In winter I add, a small folding shovel, sand/kitty litter, couple of emergency blankets and some chemical hand warmers for getting unstuck/ keeping warm while stuck.

    Yes,... yes, I agree. It's totally unfair that sober you gets into trouble for things that drunk you did.
  • GafotoGafoto Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    n1t0 wrote:
    1 gallon potable water.
    1 can of foam bear repellant
    1 full change of clothes and trashbag
    1 wig and fake facial hair set
    1 multitool
    1 bag of dried banana chips
    1 bag of beef jerky
    1 mini shovel
    1 stuffed animal
    1 role of toilet paper.

    This all fits pretty nicely inside my scion TC.

    Going out to the country to bury someone?

    sierracrest.jpg
  • Blake TBlake T Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Wow you guys carry heaps of stuff in your car. Personally the "essential" stuff I keep is a mapbook, pen, can of emergency deoderant, some tissues and the default tire changing stuff. Though I admit I *should* have jumper cables in there too. If it's a newish car, oil and water aren't terribly necesary as long as you check it once every month or two, older cars they are an absolute necesity.

    Double check you have ALL of the tire changing stuff, I l checked to see if I had a jack went ok and forgot about 2 years later I pull out the jack to change a tire and realise the handle to crank it had been missing, luckily one of my friends was there to lend me her handle.

    As far as the iPod go if you have a deck that can take a cd staker you can modify the line in so it's just an audio cable then plug the iPod in like so, this is how mine is so I just have a small cord at the base of my console for the iPod to go into.

  • Diomedes240zDiomedes240z Registered User
    edited November 2006
    Next time you go to KFC, wash your hands in the basin in the restroom instead of using their moist towlette thingy. Keep it and put it in the glovebox.

    Now when you check the oil someplace where there isn't soap, you have something to wipe your hands clean with.

    In my car, I have a ratchet/set of sockets and a set of spanners, but that might be a bit overboard. If your car has lock-nuts make sure you have the proper socket in the glovebox. Of course, I have a jack, chocks and tire iron in the back.

    I also have a multi-screwdriver thingy, pen & paper, some small cloths for cleaning the inside of the windscreen, and a street directory.

    Sunglasses.

    If my car had any tendancy at all to leak anything ever, I'd keep spare fluids (but I drive a Datsun, so I don't. :P ).

    I'd also keep a hot chick in the passenger seat and a blanket in the back (but I drive a Datsun, so I don't. :P ).

    fdod80.jpg
  • FaricazyFaricazy Registered User
    edited November 2006
    Honestly. Flashlight. More useful than you think. Get a nice LED Maglite.

  • EverywhereasignEverywhereasign Registered User
    edited November 2006
    Faricazy wrote:
    Honestly. Flashlight. More useful than you think. Get a nice LED Maglite.

    I go one further and got a "forever" flash light from Think Geek I never have to worry about forgetting about replacing batteries and it'll stand up to a winter night, working in the morning with a quick shake.

    I also keep one of the "Toughneck Rubbermaid" containers in my trunk, I put emergency stuff in there. I too tend to stay over at "Camp Overprepared" but I've never regretted it. Some things to add to the growing list,

    1 pack good old fashioned strike anywhere stick matches.
    Mylar 'Space' Blanket (not an issue if it doesn't get cold where you live)
    Tooth brush (you never know when you might 'stay the night' :winky: )
    100 watt Power inverter, paid for it's self again and again.

    Just to echo what others have said, Trash Bags and Toilet Paper are a MUST!

    "What are you dense? Are you retarded or something? Who the hell do you think I am? I'm the goddamn Batman!"
  • ThanatosThanatos Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    If you're going to be sticking to San Jose, you really don't need the anti-freeze, windshield fluid, or shit for getting out of the mud.

  • n1t0n1t0 Registered User
    edited November 2006
    Gafoto wrote:
    n1t0 wrote:
    1 gallon potable water.
    1 can of foam bear repellant
    1 full change of clothes and trashbag
    1 wig and fake facial hair set
    1 multitool
    1 bag of dried banana chips
    1 bag of beef jerky
    1 mini shovel
    1 stuffed animal
    1 role of toilet paper.

    This all fits pretty nicely inside my scion TC.

    Going out to the country to bury someone?

    Nonsense! :|

    n1t0.gif
  • ComahawkComahawk Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Faricazy wrote:
    Honestly. Flashlight. More useful than you think. Get a nice LED Maglite.

    I go one further and got a "forever" flash light from Think Geek I never have to worry about forgetting about replacing batteries and it'll stand up to a winter night, working in the morning with a quick shake.

    I also keep one of the "Toughneck Rubbermaid" containers in my trunk, I put emergency stuff in there. I too tend to stay over at "Camp Overprepared" but I've never regretted it. Some things to add to the growing list,

    1 pack good old fashioned strike anywhere stick matches.
    Mylar 'Space' Blanket (not an issue if it doesn't get cold where you live)
    Tooth brush (you never know when you might 'stay the night' :winky: )
    100 watt Power inverter, paid for it's self again and again.

    Just to echo what others have said, Trash Bags and Toilet Paper are a MUST!

    Do not get a forever flashlight, I have a couple, they suck.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • EverywhereasignEverywhereasign Registered User
    edited November 2006
    Comahawk wrote:

    Do not get a forever flashlight, I have a couple, they suck.

    huh, I like mine. Any reason why you say they suck?

    "What are you dense? Are you retarded or something? Who the hell do you think I am? I'm the goddamn Batman!"
  • RuckusRuckus Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Mishra wrote:
    Depending how old the car is buy the haynes guide for it. It'll save you some money by showing how to do simple things like change the headlight bulbs or oil. If your really daring they'll even show more complicated stuff like changing the suspension.

    Limed for truth. Haynes showed me how to pull my Alternator out and then put it back in when it needed a rebuild (bad 12VDC regulator). It also shows you how to change your oil, brake pads, fuel filter, air filter, transmission fluid, flush radiators, etc ad nasium.

    Besides my socket set, I keep both an emergency kit and survival kit in my car. I keep them seperate because the emergency kit contains medical supplies and everything I need if I were to come across an accident (gloves, CPR mask, compresses, swabs, etc) and the survival kit only contains items myself and passengers would need if I were trapped or stranded (on the Canadian Prairies during Winter).

    Raneados wrote: »
    so what SPECIFICALLY is the problem with my hole?
  • RaggaholicRaggaholic Registered User
    edited November 2006
    Ruckus wrote:
    Mishra wrote:
    Depending how old the car is buy the haynes guide for it. It'll save you some money by showing how to do simple things like change the headlight bulbs or oil. If your really daring they'll even show more complicated stuff like changing the suspension.

    Limed for truth.

    But how good is it for Joe Sixpack-Average? I ask because, although I could change my air filter and oil, I couldn't figure my brakepads out for the life of me, including after a guy from Firestone gave me a printout.

    I'm running low on funds and need to get my fuel filter changed. How do you think the average person would fair on those things with just a Haynes guide?

    (Yes, I know this tangents off a bit, but I think this info could be vital to the OP as well.)

    Feral wrote:
    Hell just froze over, because I just agreed with everything Raggaholic said in post about sex.
  • RuckusRuckus Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Haynes are like a do-it-yourself guide. They layout where you'll be working (on the car), what you'll need (tool wise), and then take you step by step through the procedure, and have some pretty good images too. Before you do anything in the book, read through the procedure a few times, do a dry run (go through the guide imagining which bolts need to be removed, what the best way to remove parts is, etc), and it should be fine. The guide tells you when you need to disconnect the battery and how to uncharge fuel lines and all that.

    Raneados wrote: »
    so what SPECIFICALLY is the problem with my hole?
  • EggyToastEggyToast Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    1. A cellphone charger
    2. A membership to Better World Club

    That's really all you need. If anything happens, you can charge your phone and call for assistance. Yes, you can carry around enough stuff to fix everything yourself, but if you don't know what you're doing, it's just going to sit in your trunk and get in the way when you actually use your trunk.

    Be able to change your tire, and be able to jump your battery. Everything else you should avoid through due diligence -- check your fluid levels regularly, change your oil regularly, take your car for tune-ups or check-ups every once in a while. And the really random things, have both car insurance and a membership to BWC (or AAA if you REALLY want to).

    || Flickr — || PSN: EggyToast
  • ComahawkComahawk Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Comahawk wrote:

    Do not get a forever flashlight, I have a couple, they suck.

    huh, I like mine. Any reason why you say they suck?

    Wind wind wind, Go! *10seconds of light later* "Fuck" wind wind wind...

    They simply just do not light anything for long enough.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • CorvusCorvus Caw? VancouverRegistered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Qorzm wrote:
    I just got my first car (used Honda Accord EX) and I was wondering what the next step is.

    I'm getting an alarm put in, new cell phone/DS chargers, and a few scratches fixed. I need something to play my iPod with. I've seen those cassette tape things with a cord-to-iPod, and I've also seen some docks that use suction-cup technology. Any advice for those?

    What else are essentials for cars? Spare waters, maybe a swiss army knife, books, I honestly don't know.

    If anyone could help me out, it would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!

    Jumper Cables, and a Jack and a spare tire, and the knowledge to use them. Knowing how to take care of these emergencies when they come up reduces a lot of the stress.

    I like to keep a map book in my car, but I'm paranoid about getting lost, and I'm shit with directions.

    A spare jacket or umbrella depending on where you live. Maybe a hat or some suncreen.

    Some spare change for parking, pay phones if you need one (though these are getting rarer), and whatever else.

  • FeralFeral Who needs a medical license when you've got style? Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    EggyToast wrote:
    1. A cellphone charger
    2. A membership to Better World Club

    That's really all you need. If anything happens, you can charge your phone and call for assistance. Yes, you can carry around enough stuff to fix everything yourself, but if you don't know what you're doing, it's just going to sit in your trunk and get in the way when you actually use your trunk.

    Be able to change your tire, and be able to jump your battery. Everything else you should avoid through due diligence -- check your fluid levels regularly, change your oil regularly, take your car for tune-ups or check-ups every once in a while. And the really random things, have both car insurance and a membership to BWC (or AAA if you REALLY want to).

    Many insurance companies offer roadside assistance. It's a little more convenient (and sometimes cheaper) than paying two bills.

    every person who doesn't like an acquired taste always seems to think everyone who likes it is faking it. it should be an official fallacy.
    the "no true scotch, man" fallacy.
  • TexiKenTexiKen Oh, no. And that's that.Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Did you get the car inspected by your local mechanic when you bought it, just to do a check to see if everything's up to snuff?

    Also, change the oil right away. Go by the rule of thumb that a 16 year old girl drove th car before you, meaning there was no care whatsoever to the car. I use Royal Purple synthetic, and it runs very well. You can get 8k+ out of it.

    Always put a spare $10.00 or $20.00 somewhere in the car, in case you need it for gas or you get stranded somewhere and someone helps you out.

    I recommend the haynes manuals as well.

    ohno_zpsdb826db6.jpg
  • zhen_roguezhen_rogue Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Registration, Proof of Insurance.

  • ProtoProto Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    EggyToast wrote:
    1. A cellphone charger
    2. A membership to Better World Club

    That's really all you need. If anything happens, you can charge your phone and call for assistance. Yes, you can carry around enough stuff to fix everything yourself, but if you don't know what you're doing, it's just going to sit in your trunk and get in the way when you actually use your trunk.

    ...unless your battery dies.

    Besides, keeping a few things like a flashlight, blanket, first-aid kit, etc. makes good sense. You don't ever want to have to rely on someone coming to your rescue.

    and her knees up on the glove compartment
    took out her barrettes and her hair spilled out like rootbeer
  • ViolentChemistryViolentChemistry __BANNED USERS
    edited November 2006
    If you want to be ultimate-zomie-apocalypse-preparedness, you need:
    1) Jumper cables.
    2) Make sure you have a jack, a lug-wrench and a spare.
    3) It never hurts to have an extra "thing" of each non-fuel fluid in the car. By "thing" I mean whatever basic volume it sells in. Premixed ratiator fluid, some power-steering fluid, DOT 3 brake fluid, washer-fluid, one or two quarts of oil in case you find out by experience that it burns or leaks oil, and some bottled water because replacing fluids in the nearest parking-lot is thirsty work.
    4) Flashlight, socket-set, set of screwdrivers, adjustable wrench.
    5) Assortment-pack of spare fuses of whatever type of fuse your car uses.
    6) A warm blanket, flannel is great for this.
    7) Shotgun, shells (for zombies).

    Edit: It wouldn't hurt to have a lighter around, either. Fire is critical to human survival.

    DAMM
    Drunks Against Mad Mothers
  • FaricazyFaricazy Registered User
    edited November 2006
    Comahawk wrote:
    Comahawk wrote:

    Do not get a forever flashlight, I have a couple, they suck.

    huh, I like mine. Any reason why you say they suck?

    Wind wind wind, Go! *10seconds of light later* "Fuck" wind wind wind...

    They simply just do not light anything for long enough.
    And it's plastic, isn't it?

    Get a nice big Maglite. Nothing can kill them.

  • embrikembrik Registered User
    edited November 2006
    Faricazy wrote:
    Comahawk wrote:
    Comahawk wrote:

    Do not get a forever flashlight, I have a couple, they suck.

    huh, I like mine. Any reason why you say they suck?

    Wind wind wind, Go! *10seconds of light later* "Fuck" wind wind wind...

    They simply just do not light anything for long enough.
    And it's plastic, isn't it?

    Get a nice big Maglite. Nothing can kill them.

    Maybe not, but their batteries can still die. I'd recommend a Surefire flashlight like the G2. These babies are super-bright, and they take Lithium batteries - i.e. 10+ year shelf-life. I've got one of their lights, and they are the best. They kick the pants off of Maglites. All I'll say is that I've owned both brands, and since buying my Surefire, I've lost track of my Maglite. I think I might order a G2 for my trunk, now that we're on the subject.

    Also - I've got a couple of road flares. Not a bad idea if you're caught close to traffic at night.

    "Damn you and your Daily Doubles, you brigand!"

    I don't believe it - I'm on my THIRD PS3, and my FIRST XBOX360. What the heck?
  • FaricazyFaricazy Registered User
    edited November 2006
    embrik wrote:
    Faricazy wrote:
    Comahawk wrote:
    Comahawk wrote:

    Do not get a forever flashlight, I have a couple, they suck.

    huh, I like mine. Any reason why you say they suck?

    Wind wind wind, Go! *10seconds of light later* "Fuck" wind wind wind...

    They simply just do not light anything for long enough.
    And it's plastic, isn't it?

    Get a nice big Maglite. Nothing can kill them.

    Maybe not, but their batteries can still die. I'd recommend a Surefire flashlight like the G2. These babies are super-bright, and they take Lithium batteries - i.e. 10+ year shelf-life. I've got one of their lights, and they are the best. They kick the pants off of Maglites. All I'll say is that I've owned both brands, and since buying my Surefire, I've lost track of my Maglite. I think I might order a G2 for my trunk, now that we're on the subject.

    Also - I've got a couple of road flares. Not a bad idea if you're caught close to traffic at night.
    Fancy. :o

    Might as well get a flashlight with a Luxeon lamp. :lol:

  • SUPER_JESUSSUPER_JESUS Registered User
    edited November 2006
    I drive an old as vw so this is what I carry

    -full socket set
    -all the rest of my tools
    -factory repair manual
    -a gallon of water
    -2 quarts of oil
    -jumper cables
    -non factory jack (so much nicer changing a tire on the side of the road, in snow, at night)
    -extra coat
    -tire pressure gauge
    -cell phone + charger
    - AAA card -for premium it is only $30 a year and you get 3 tows of 100 miles, this is also helpful if youhave friends who drive shady cars, i can not recommend having this more

  • Sir CarcassSir Carcass I have been shown the end of my world Austin, TXRegistered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Always carry a college Chemistry textbook in the trunk. You never know when you might need to teach alchemists how to make gunpowder.

    Other than most things listed, I'd recommend a small bottle of sunscreen in case you're stranded during the summer and stuck outside your car. Also, a small lint brush. Comes in handy for job interviews. And definitely recommend the windshield scraper, even if you don't get snow. Ice storms happen and you'll be glad you had one.

    camo_sig2.png
  • clsCorwinclsCorwin Registered User
    edited November 2006
    While I do have a Surefire in my toolbox which resides in my trunk, I also have a normal flashlight. Why you ask? Run that surefire for about an hour, and your batteries are gone. Now try finding CR123 batteries in some random podunk gas station. A good D cell powered maglight will last you a long ass time, plus its a handy tool for beating off any unfriendlies.

    Personally, I carry a 3 gallon gas can, my tool box (which contains a craftsman 155 pc toolset, 26 screwdrivers, various C clamps, vice grips, a ballpeen hammer, a monkey wrench, and pretty much any kind of bit you'd come across (torx, hex, etc)), my electrical set (which includes about 10+ of each fuse I use, crimpers, wiring, connecters, and electrical tape) a 3 ton floor jack, a donut tire, and a breaker bar (4 way lug wrench). I can pretty much do anything I need to my car at any given moment, except, well, tow it.

    Oh, and a blanket and travel pillow.

  • wenchkillawenchkilla Registered User
    edited November 2006
    While everyone is giving great tips on what stuff to put in your car, I want to remind you of something important: Honda Accords are one of the most stolen car out there. A good friend of mine has had his stolen TWICE, from two different places, and both times the dicks stole every last thing that was actually part of the car. He lost many hundreds of dollars on these occasions.

    Unless you live in a gated community that is guarded by security 24/7 * take valuables with you when leaving your car parked for a long time, and buy one of those brightly colored steering wheel lock things and put it on when parked. It's true that anyone with skill and the right tools and bypass it, but it is a deterrent method: they'd rather fuck with a car that's far easier to steal.

    *(A similar situation would be if you live in a very bad neighborhood, but are a badass motherfucker, and everyone within a 20 mile radius knows the car you drive and that you would find them and stab them in the face if they ever touched it. This probably does not apply to you.)

    gamingsig.jpg
    PSN/XBL: dragoniemx
  • FaricazyFaricazy Registered User
    edited November 2006
    wenchkilla wrote:
    While everyone is giving great tips on what stuff to put in your car, I want to remind you of something important: Honda Accords are one of the most stolen car out there. A good friend of mine has had his stolen TWICE, from two different places, and both times the dicks stole every last thing that was actually part of the car. He lost many hundreds of dollars on these occasions.

    Unless you live in a gated community that is guarded by security 24/7 * take valuables with you when leaving your car parked for a long time, and buy one of those brightly colored steering wheel lock things and put it on when parked. It's true that anyone with skill and the right tools and bypass it, but it is a deterrent method: they'd rather fuck with a car that's far easier to steal.

    *(A similar situation would be if you live in a very bad neighborhood, but are a badass motherfucker, and everyone within a 20 mile radius knows the car you drive and that you would find them and stab them in the face if they ever touched it. This probably does not apply to you.)
    http://www.statefarm.com/learning/be_safe/road/learning_besafe_onroad_cartheft1.asp.

    Honda's ARE prone to theft, mostly the ricer years. I would never even touch an Integra living in New York. But Accords....eh. The newer ones are very pedestrian and are absolutely everywhere. I wouldn't worry much.

  • CycophantCycophant Registered User
    edited November 2006
    An important point to note is that unless you know how to use them, and are very familiar with the mechanical workings of your car, carrying a huge toolset in your trunk is rather useless. I don't know how many people I've seen lug a several pound toolset around their car for years, only to never use it when the car breaks down because they couldn't fix anything anyway.

    If you are mechanically inclined and just not that knowledgeable about the car, consider picking up a Haynes manual or something similiar and throwing that with the toolbox.

    sig.gif
  • embrikembrik Registered User
    edited November 2006
    clsCorwin wrote:
    While I do have a Surefire in my toolbox which resides in my trunk, I also have a normal flashlight. Why you ask? Run that surefire for about an hour, and your batteries are gone. Now try finding CR123 batteries in some random podunk gas station.

    Good point. You could always buy and store extra batteries, since they have the same long life, but there is cost associated with that, obviously, and D cells are pretty easy to find. The upside to lithiums, however, is that if you are in the middle of nowhere and it's really hot or really cold, the Surefire is more likely to work, since lithiums work properly in a huge temperature range. If I can find my Maglite, I'll throw it in with my other flashlight.

    "Damn you and your Daily Doubles, you brigand!"

    I don't believe it - I'm on my THIRD PS3, and my FIRST XBOX360. What the heck?
  • RuckusRuckus Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    I keep a mini-maglite in my kit, with a thin piece of cardboard inbetween the bottom battery and basecap (to keep the batteries fresh). If for some reason I use the flashlight at all, I pull the batteries and put in a fresh pair when I get home, use the old ones for something else (like TV remotes, I have about 3 that use AA).

    I'm also thinking of buying the LED Modkit for mini-mags and a baseswitch from thinkgeek. Basically it's a triple LED cluster to replace the headpiece and a Smart switch (100,50,25 percent power, slow strobe, fast strobe). Apparently the LED's alone increase the battery life by about 20 hours at full power.

    Raneados wrote: »
    so what SPECIFICALLY is the problem with my hole?
  • GafotoGafoto Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Faricazy wrote:
    wenchkilla wrote:
    While everyone is giving great tips on what stuff to put in your car, I want to remind you of something important: Honda Accords are one of the most stolen car out there. A good friend of mine has had his stolen TWICE, from two different places, and both times the dicks stole every last thing that was actually part of the car. He lost many hundreds of dollars on these occasions.

    Unless you live in a gated community that is guarded by security 24/7 * take valuables with you when leaving your car parked for a long time, and buy one of those brightly colored steering wheel lock things and put it on when parked. It's true that anyone with skill and the right tools and bypass it, but it is a deterrent method: they'd rather fuck with a car that's far easier to steal.

    *(A similar situation would be if you live in a very bad neighborhood, but are a badass motherfucker, and everyone within a 20 mile radius knows the car you drive and that you would find them and stab them in the face if they ever touched it. This probably does not apply to you.)
    http://www.statefarm.com/learning/be_safe/road/learning_besafe_onroad_cartheft1.asp.

    Honda's ARE prone to theft, mostly the ricer years. I would never even touch an Integra living in New York. But Accords....eh. The newer ones are very pedestrian and are absolutely everywhere. I wouldn't worry much.

    Some of that is probably based on availability to thieves. 95 Civics are still all over the road so they're going to get stolen still.

    Couldn't hurt to pry off the EX badge (and any V6 badges) on the back though. The EX V6 is the nicest Accord you can buy so fooling anyone walking past into thinking it was an LX I4 couldn't hurt.

    sierracrest.jpg
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