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Starting in 3d

that1banderthat1bander Registered User
hey, i know atleast a few of you work in 3d, and i'm looking to get started in it. what program would you say would be best for someone who knows nothing about it? a buddy of mine have a 30 day trial for 3d studio max, but im not shure if i should just jump into something like that.

thanks.

that1bander on

Posts

  • GekkoGekko Registered User
    edited November 2003
  • chewiechewie Registered User
    edited November 2003
    I am working in Maya as we speak. I like it but I didn't have to pay for it (work perk).

    3D studio is a serious pain in the ass. There are reasons why there are so many tutorials for it. Because you could never figure most of that crap out yourself. A former coworker of mine is now working with Max and, having formerly used Maya, freakin hates Max. I would advise against it.

    People seem to like what Lightwave has done recently and it is significantly cheaper, though none are cheap.

  • Fire_FoxFire_Fox Registered User
    edited November 2003
    There is a free 3d program out there, or it was free the last time I looked. wings 3d. something to that effect.

  • gothicaleighgothicaleigh Registered User
    edited November 2003
    Cinema 4D from Maxon is the best I've used.

    www.maxoncomputer.com

    A bit expensive, but if you want the very best...
    This is the software used for The Matrix sequels, Spiderman, Shrek, etc. Very impressive stuff and really user friendly.

    -God is what Mind becomes when it has passed beyond the scope of our comprehension-
  • M2tMM2tM Registered User regular
    edited November 2003
    Did Maya do Final Fantasy, Toystory, and Monsters Inc? Or were those in-house programs?

    "We can be richer than industry as long as we know that there are things that we don't really need." -Willy Mason
  • galengalen Registered User
    edited November 2003
    Toy Story and Monsters Inc were likely in-house, but I believe that FF was done on Softimage XSI.

  • gothicaleighgothicaleigh Registered User
    edited November 2003
    Here's a partial list of things created with C4D(from the Maxon website):

    Star Wars 2-The Attack of the Clones, Spiderman, The Mummy Returns, Gladiator, Tomb Raider, the new Columbia-TriStar Film Logo, the On-Air Packages for Comedy Central, Monday Night Football, Discovery Channel Canada, Inspector Gadget, The Emmys on CBS, TiVO, NBC, DirecTV, CBS NFL, Mad TV, Smart House, J.A.G., The WB, Fox Kids







    I believe Square uses an in-house program for it's CG and movies, but I may be wrong because this guy looks awfully familiar: http://www.maxon.net/pages/products/bodypaint3d/bp3d_r2/gallery/altermann_mimik.jpg

    -God is what Mind becomes when it has passed beyond the scope of our comprehension-
  • chewiechewie Registered User
    edited November 2003
    Though keep in mind that the off the shelf programs look nothing like what these big boys use. These companies have tool writers that fine tune the programs for their specific use to the point where the original program is just a base.

  • gothicaleighgothicaleigh Registered User
    edited November 2003
    I agree.
    Even the best program is only as good as the models and textures supplied by the user. A background in C++ is almost required at film quality levels too.

    -God is what Mind becomes when it has passed beyond the scope of our comprehension-
  • RingwraithRingwraith Registered User
    edited November 2003
    Alias has a free version of Maya called Personal Learning Edition. The newest version (PLE of Maya 5) only has watermarks on the renders, and I believe they dumbed down a few tools, not sure about that though.

    Find it here :http://www.alias.com/eng/products-services/maya/maya_ple/index.shtml

  • KeithKeith Registered User regular
    edited November 2003
    I believe Maya was used to make Metroid Prime and Wind Waker's graphics.

    I have the Personal Learning Edition. Opened it once, played with it a bit, and have yet to go back. I need a 3-button mouse, and some tutorials.

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    Steam | 3DS: 3497-0691-2891
  • NadreckNadreck Registered User
    edited November 2003
    Maya has a completely free version of their software called MayaPLE (Personal Learning Edition). It's full featured, except that you are limited in what you can save/export as, and there is a bigass watermark on it. They have a large support community on their site, also.

    Most movie studios don't use just one program, because different programs do different things better or worse than others. If you want a good magazine to keep you informed in what is actually get used in the CG industry, I suggest you pick up Computer Graphics World. It's fairly thin, and isn't a teaching magazine, but it's loaded with great information about what is IN use, and what's coming down the pike.

    I will re-echo the previous sentiment that NONE of them are cheap. I went with Maya to learn on because I could get a non-expiring, FREE, full featured version. Something to keep in mind.

    gr0k.
  • MaydayMayday generation three hybrid Registered User regular
    edited November 2003
    On the other hand, I think that Blender is one of the best for newbies ([yoda] the most functional interfaces it's got[/yoda]). check out www.blender3d.com. You'll find lots of tutes in the Oldsite (click community/websites in the main page).

  • ShinpugShinpug Registered User
    edited November 2003
    I work with Maya at home and MAX at work.

    My opinion:

    Max= :?

    MAYA= :D

    I could go on and on about this, basically any 3d package is going to have a high learning curve to it in the beginning as everything is done within it, animating, rigging, lighting, rendering, texturing, modeling. Just go to a forum such as www.cgchannel.com and ask the folks there. You will get alot of more in depth opinions and advice as there are only a couple of us here at AC who do this full time

    yoshicon.gif
  • CriminalSavantCriminalSavant Registered User
    edited November 2003
    hey, i know atleast a few of you work in 3d, and i'm looking to get started in it. what program would you say would be best for someone who knows nothing about it? a buddy of mine have a 30 day trial for 3d studio max, but im not shure if i should just jump into something like that.

    thanks.

    I saw your artwork in another thread, and I really dont think starting up another different thing is a good idea. How about sticking with something (or just gardening, like S_O said).

  • gothicaleighgothicaleigh Registered User
    edited November 2003
    In a way I agree with Savant. I think a lot of people assume that computers will make their stuff better. Learn the basics, then broaden your horizons. CG is not a good place to start because there is so much you need to learn to get it to work.

    -God is what Mind becomes when it has passed beyond the scope of our comprehension-
  • NadreckNadreck Registered User
    edited November 2003
    I've met consummate sculptors who were horrible at drawing, and painters who can't take a decent photograph to save their life.

    While you should absolutely continue with life drawing and other 2d practice, I don't think a proficiency (or lack thereof) should deter you from at least trying to learn digital 3d art. You never know what medium is really going to connect WITH YOU, until you try.

    gr0k.
  • 90X Double Side90X Double Side Registered User
    edited December 2003
    galen wrote:
    Toy Story and Monsters Inc were likely in-house, but I believe that FF was done on Softimage XSI.

    Pixar uses in-house animation software, but they use Maya for the modelling work. That's why they make MTOR.

  • scootchscootch Registered User
    edited December 2003
    galen wrote:
    Toy Story and Monsters Inc were likely in-house, but I believe that FF was done on Softimage XSI.

    Pixar uses in-house animation software, but they use Maya for the modelling work. That's why they make MTOR.

    watch the end credits of Pixar movies and they list all the tools used for that animation.. their latest.. Fiding nemo does not list Maya as one of the tools used.

    back on topic:
    I don't think anyone has a place in what software to recommend for other people, it's like telling other people that you should use water color, instead of oil paint.. almost all software has a pretty strong foothold in most industries. each software provide a free trial, or learning editions. try each and everyone, and see which one functions closer to how you work. this is quite hard to do if you don't know 3d, so just learn basics of 3d with any program, and than try experiementing with other proggies once you learn the basics.

    TF2 stats
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  • 90X Double Side90X Double Side Registered User
    edited December 2003
    scootch wrote:
    galen wrote:
    Toy Story and Monsters Inc were likely in-house, but I believe that FF was done on Softimage XSI.

    Pixar uses in-house animation software, but they use Maya for the modelling work. That's why they make MTOR.

    watch the end credits of Pixar movies and they list all the tools used for that animation.. their latest.. Fiding nemo does not list Maya as one of the tools used.

    http://www.mayaassociation.fsbusiness.co.uk/mov-pixar-monsters.htm

    Pixar uses Maya to model everything that isn't so complex it needs to be sculpted (all the complex characters are digitized sculptures; sets, props, and everything else are modeled in Maya).

  • scootchscootch Registered User
    edited December 2003
    scootch wrote:
    galen wrote:
    Toy Story and Monsters Inc were likely in-house, but I believe that FF was done on Softimage XSI.

    Pixar uses in-house animation software, but they use Maya for the modelling work. That's why they make MTOR.

    watch the end credits of Pixar movies and they list all the tools used for that animation.. their latest.. Fiding nemo does not list Maya as one of the tools used.

    http://www.mayaassociation.fsbusiness.co.uk/mov-pixar-monsters.htm

    Pixar uses Maya to model everything that isn't so complex it needs to be sculpted (all the complex characters are digitized sculptures; sets, props, and everything else are modeled in Maya).

    why the fuck did they decide not to list it, those bastards ><

    TF2 stats
    PSN: super_emu
    Xbox360 Gamertag: Emuchop
  • LoserLoser Registered User regular
    edited December 2003
    personally, i like max better than maya. but maybe that's because i started in max, and when i tried to switch to maya it was just too different for me. but i don't really think it matters what program you start with. if you're going to be good with 3d, you'll be able to figure out whatever program you choose. if you can't get a handle on it then 3d probably isn't your thing. its more about the person and less about the program.

  • misosoupmisosoup Registered User
    edited October 2005
    Pixar use a custom tool called Renderman. no buttons just text.
    The best imo for starting in 3d is Cinema 4d, you can get old versions for free from various places, for basic modelling it's a piece of piss, sucks at natural forms but awesome fro robots and stuff without that randomness element unless your awesome at creating maps to apply to your models which is another good function of 4d, it has a sister program which runs through the same program called Bodypaint which is really handy for starting to apply texture maps and such.
    I personaly use Maya and 4d together I don't think that any single program can be called "the best" because there are things you can do on each that you can't do in another, just get PS and some 3d programs and use them all...
    thats right All of them....

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  • MalevolentPirateMalevolentPirate Registered User
    edited April 2006
    There's a free version of XSI called Mod Tool you can get of Fileplanet. It can still do a lot of the good stuff as full XSI, but with some limitations. There's an exporter for Valve's Source engine and one for Unreal Engine that you can take right off SoftImages site.

    I used MAX for a long time and its meh, and I don't care for maya PLE at all. I like Lightwave, but they teach XSI at my school so I'm going to be moving over to that soon.

    Member Since April 2004
  • MrSneakMrSneak Registered User
    edited February 2008
    I really prefer 3D Studio Max. For me, the interface seems much more straight forward once you understand how it's organized. Also, features like Character Studio make animation very accessible. It would seem hard to survive as a game animator without Character Studio!

    I had previous experience with 3D when I was exposed to Max and Maya, so maybe that's why Max was more attractive. There are certain features I really like about Maya, like the default light just seems... better than Max's. As well as the ability to click-and-drag a render window. That kind of thing is pretty handy when you're got a high-res scene with fancy lighting.

    Blizzard uses 3D Studio Max, for gameplay and cutscenes.

  • maverickpixelmaverickpixel Registered User
    edited July 2009
    Maya is the industry standard... by far. there is a reason for it. MEL . A coding language based specifically for its own program. Bigger studios who dont use maya use some form of it, IE proprietary programs that are usually developed from maya's base architecture. . Rhythm and hues uses maya for modeling and their own proprietary program for animating, which looks and feels exactly like maya.

    from my experience the smaller studios and simulation studios use C4D, and 3d studio max. But for major motion graphics its usually done in some form of maya

    Ill agree maya is harder to learn, but its alot more flexible thats why its so predominate in today's studios

  • maverickpixelmaverickpixel Registered User
    edited July 2009
    MrSneak wrote: »
    I really prefer 3D Studio Max. For me, the interface seems much more straight forward once you understand how it's organized. Also, features like Character Studio make animation very accessible. It would seem hard to survive as a game animator without Character Studio!

    I had previous experience with 3D when I was exposed to Max and Maya, so maybe that's why Max was more attractive. There are certain features I really like about Maya, like the default light just seems... better than Max's. As well as the ability to click-and-drag a render window. That kind of thing is pretty handy when you're got a high-res scene with fancy lighting.

    Blizzard uses 3D Studio Max, for gameplay and cutscenes.



    oh yeah good luck working for blizzard... The last con i was at they werent even accepting reels.

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