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Cultural Group Fails to Understand Internet

TubularLuggageTubularLuggage Registered User regular
In what almost sounds like a story from The Onion, a Canadian cultural group wants to regulate the internet, ensuring more space for Canadian content.
http://thechronicleherald.ca/Business/1107042.html
"What we simply want is a place for Canadian stories," said Richard Hardacre of the actors guild, ACTRA. "We know if we don’t get it right now, tomorrow will be too late."
About 93 per cent of Canadians have the ability to access all types of music, videos and films on their computers through a broadband connection, and an increasing number do.

That is precisely why the commission needs to move quickly to ensure Canadian programs have a guaranteed space on the new platforms, said ACTRA witnesses
Hollywood is already planning to begin making current-run films available on the Internet, which could be accessed from Canada without any restrictions or assurances Canadians films are also offered, they said.
The actors guild would go even further in instituting content rules that would require "shelf space" on new media for Canadian productions.

Full Story
Spoiler:

So essentially, producers and performers of Canadian media are worried about Canadians not watching their content on the internet, and so rather than actually producing something worth watching, they're calling for the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission to "regulate the internet".

The only way I can even see something like this working is to block access to American shows and films to any Canadian internet users. The problem with this kind of protectionism is that, unlike many material goods, media isn't interchangeable. Someone who wants to watch a certain American program isn't going to just go watch some other show on CBC when they can't access the American show. It's not the same thing.

Should countries try to block content from other countries for the purpose of promoting their own content, or should the internet remain an open exchange of media? I'm very much for the latter. I think if networks in a country want to compete, they have to make something people actually want to watch.

TubularLuggage on
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Posts

  • AegisAegis Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Yay, a thread on this!

    I can understand the CRTC looking into this (considering their last ruling was 10 years ago when cellphones and highspeed internet use wasn't widespread), but I'm fairly sure they're going to not opt for regulation considering: it's fuck all impossible and more importantly if you want more content on the internet...then you're free to put it on there. It's not like the structure of the internet makes it such that you're being crowded out by alternative media from other countries (Google seems to agree since they've come out against this plan to regulate). Hell, I had thought that Canadian artists had been turning to the internet just to get that better exposure on their own already.

    This entire thing has reeks of RIAA influence to me.

  • CorvusCorvus Caw? VancouverRegistered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Oh lordy, can con regulations for the internet? You've got to be fucking kidding me. There is tonnes of Canadian content available on the internet already, there's no need for this. And really, how much good do Cancon regulations on TV and Radio do? I mean, providing government incentives to play more Nickleback isn't a good thing.

    The guy in the article says it best.
    "The bottom line is they are trying to solve a problem that doesn’t exist," Boyd said.

  • OlivawOlivaw good name, isn't it? peach treesRegistered User regular
    edited February 2009
    About 93 per cent of Canadians have the ability to access all types of music, videos and films on their computers through a broadband connection, and an increasing number do.

    Wow

    This is a pretty impressive statistic

    7u0YG.gif
    PSN ID : DetectiveOlivaw | TWITTER | SCREENED | STEAM ID | BUY SOME STUFF!
  • RichyRichy Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    I remember hearing about this months ago, back when the CRTC made a public call for statements from interested parties. One of the parties that responded was Google.
    Google wrote:
    The New Media Exemption is the best regulatory approach to keeping the internet awesome.

    Unfortunately, I very much doubt the CRTC has a notion of awesomeness. If anything, their style would be to legislate awesomeness and only allow it in well-controlled amounts through predefined awesome-carrying channels. Also, 20% of awesome should be in French.

    The old CBC news article.

    RichyFlag.gifsig.gif
  • Dunadan019Dunadan019 Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    is this along the same lines as "this percentage of canadian television has to be canadian original programs"?

  • TomantaTomanta Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
  • AegisAegis Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Dunadan019 wrote: »
    is this along the same lines as "this percentage of canadian television has to be canadian original programs"?

    Yes. Except over the Internet rather than easily controllable TV/Radio stations.

  • RussellRussell Registered User
    edited February 2009
    So is this all based on the notion that there's 'limited space' on the internet?

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • TrusTrus Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Dunadan019 wrote: »
    is this along the same lines as "this percentage of canadian television has to be canadian original programs"?

    Pretty much

    qFN53.png
  • Dunadan019Dunadan019 Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Trus wrote: »
    Dunadan019 wrote: »
    is this along the same lines as "this percentage of canadian television has to be canadian original programs"?

    Pretty much

    silly canadians.

    damnit, i was trying not to say that.

    whats the probability this will actually go anywhere?

  • SentrySentry Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    why bother? America already has their greatest talent over here...

    Alan Thick!!

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    wrote:
    When I was a little kid, I always pretended I was the hero,' Skip said.
    'Fuck yeah, me too. What little kid ever pretended to be part of the lynch-mob?'
  • RussellRussell Registered User
    edited February 2009
    Sentry wrote: »
    why bother? America already has their greatest talent over here...

    Alan Thick!!

    Tom Green

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Dunadan019Dunadan019 Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Russell wrote: »
    Sentry wrote: »
    why bother? America already has their greatest talent over here...

    Alan Thick!!

    Tom Green

    i snorted. :)

  • CorvusCorvus Caw? VancouverRegistered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Olivaw wrote: »
    About 93 per cent of Canadians have the ability to access all types of music, videos and films on their computers through a broadband connection, and an increasing number do.

    Wow

    This is a pretty impressive statistic

    We've long had one of the best rates of broadband access per capita in the OECD.

  • SentrySentry Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Olivaw wrote: »
    About 93 per cent of Canadians have the ability to access all types of music, videos and films on their computers through a broadband connection, and an increasing number do.

    Wow

    This is a pretty impressive statistic

    Unless it's 93 per cent of Canadians with an internet connection, in which case it's kind of sad.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    wrote:
    When I was a little kid, I always pretended I was the hero,' Skip said.
    'Fuck yeah, me too. What little kid ever pretended to be part of the lynch-mob?'
  • RichyRichy Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Dunadan019 wrote: »
    Trus wrote: »
    Dunadan019 wrote: »
    is this along the same lines as "this percentage of canadian television has to be canadian original programs"?

    Pretty much

    silly canadians.

    damnit, i was trying not to say that.

    whats the probability this will actually go anywhere?
    On the one hand, don't underestimate the CRTC's love for long, complicated, pointless regulation. They are a regulatory body, and they love every second of it. They would regulate the sunset to include a more Canadian shade of red if they could.

    On the other hand, short of setting up a Canadian version of the Great Firewall of China, their regulation will have no teeth. They can't force websites in other nations to do what they want, and they can't control which websites Canadians visit.

    The best case scenario is that they come to their senses and don't embarrass themselves. Maybe setup a "Canadian Content portal" website, which would be nice.

    RichyFlag.gifsig.gif
  • DaedalusDaedalus Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Russell wrote: »
    So is this all based on the notion that there's 'limited space' on the internet?
    Well, there technically is: the IPv4 address space is going to be exhausted in a few years, and any country that isn't the United States kinda got the short end when it was allocated in the first place (though Canada is better off in terms of IP addresses per capita than China is.)

    vvvvvv-dithw.png
  • SpeakerSpeaker Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    American culture.

    Coming at you like a Mongol Horde.

    Look Out!

    RandySavage045.jpg

    Being walkers with the dawn and morning,
    Walkers with the sun and morning, we are not afraid of night,
    Nor days of gloom, nor darkness -
    Being walkers with the sun and morning.
  • RussellRussell Registered User
    edited February 2009
    Daedalus wrote: »
    Russell wrote: »
    So is this all based on the notion that there's 'limited space' on the internet?
    Well, there technically is: the IPv4 address space is going to be exhausted in a few years, and any country that isn't the United States kinda got the short end when it was allocated in the first place (though Canada is better off in terms of IP addresses per capita than China is.)

    Me after reading the wikipedia entry: D:
    Lack of infrastructure investment is really coming to a head.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • RussellRussell Registered User
    edited February 2009
    Speaker wrote: »
    American culture.

    Coming at you like a Mongol Horde.

    Look Out!

    RandySavage045.jpg

    My God, it's full of stars

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • monikermoniker Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Daedalus wrote: »
    Russell wrote: »
    So is this all based on the notion that there's 'limited space' on the internet?
    Well, there technically is: the IPv4 address space is going to be exhausted in a few years, and any country that isn't the United States kinda got the short end when it was allocated in the first place (though Canada is better off in terms of IP addresses per capita than China is.)

    But, where is the internet stored?

    tea-1.jpg
  • RichyRichy Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    moniker wrote: »
    Daedalus wrote: »
    Russell wrote: »
    So is this all based on the notion that there's 'limited space' on the internet?
    Well, there technically is: the IPv4 address space is going to be exhausted in a few years, and any country that isn't the United States kinda got the short end when it was allocated in the first place (though Canada is better off in terms of IP addresses per capita than China is.)

    But, where is the internet stored?
    It's in a shoebox in my closet.

    RichyFlag.gifsig.gif
  • TubularLuggageTubularLuggage Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    moniker wrote: »
    Daedalus wrote: »
    Russell wrote: »
    So is this all based on the notion that there's 'limited space' on the internet?
    Well, there technically is: the IPv4 address space is going to be exhausted in a few years, and any country that isn't the United States kinda got the short end when it was allocated in the first place (though Canada is better off in terms of IP addresses per capita than China is.)

    But, where is the internet stored?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iRmxXp62O8g

  • CouscousCouscous Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Sentry wrote: »
    why bother? America already has their greatest talent over here...

    Alan Thick!!

    Can we give Celine Dion back to you?

  • Dunadan019Dunadan019 Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    moniker wrote: »
    Daedalus wrote: »
    Russell wrote: »
    So is this all based on the notion that there's 'limited space' on the internet?
    Well, there technically is: the IPv4 address space is going to be exhausted in a few years, and any country that isn't the United States kinda got the short end when it was allocated in the first place (though Canada is better off in terms of IP addresses per capita than China is.)

    But, where is the internet stored?

    snip


    we should try turning the CRTC off and back on again.

  • ZoolanderZoolander Registered User
    edited February 2009
    I hope this gets slapped down like a baby seal.

  • CorvusCorvus Caw? VancouverRegistered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Speaker wrote: »
    American culture.

    Coming at you like a Mongol Horde.

    Look Out!

    macho man

    I think "Ohhhh Yeaaaahhh" would have been the better line.
    Zoolander wrote: »
    I hope this gets slapped down like a baby seal.

    In traditional Canadian fashion.

  • TubularLuggageTubularLuggage Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Zoolander wrote: »
    I hope this gets slapped down like a baby seal.

    I'm guessing it will, as soon as someone explains to them how the internet actually works.

  • ZombiemamboZombiemambo Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    The internet is getting filled up awfully fast, guys. If Canada doesn't act soon, none of their stuff will fit.

    JKKaAGp.png
  • SentrySentry Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    we'd better block or candianify some of those tubes...

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    wrote:
    When I was a little kid, I always pretended I was the hero,' Skip said.
    'Fuck yeah, me too. What little kid ever pretended to be part of the lynch-mob?'
  • RichyRichy Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Looks like the Canadification of the Web isn't the only thing the CRTC is asked to rule on. Bell Canada has been messin' with the tubes...
    A coalition of more than 70 technology companies, including internet search leader Google, online retailer Amazon and voice over internet provider Skype, is calling on the CRTC to ban internet service providers from "traffic shaping," or using technology that favours some applications over others.

    The submissions were in response to the CRTC's call for comments in its probe into the issue of internet traffic management, with hearings expected to be held on July 6 in Gatineau, Que.

    The hearings were set up following complaints from the Canadian Association of Internet Providers (CAIP) that Bell Canada is selectively slowing down or "throttling" internet traffic generated by peer-to-peer (P2P) file-sharing applications such as BitTorrent or "shaping" traffic to favour other applications over P2P in an effort to reduce network congestion.

    Deep packet inspection (DPI) is a form of computer network packet filing originally used to scan for spam or viruses, but one that also allows the inspection of content, and can be used to allow some applications to be given greater priority than others. In its submission to the CRTC, Bell said it uses the technology to redistribute P2P file-sharing traffic to off-peak periods, but does not block the file sharing outright nor does it block other kinds of applications.

    "There is concern that the implementation of DPI for internet traffic management has been done in a manner that is less than transparent and potentially inconsistent with an individual's/consumer's expectations," she wrote.

    RichyFlag.gifsig.gif
  • DeciusDecius Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Canadian
    Regulators
    are
    Totally
    Clueless

    Remember this acronym next time you start questioning something the CRTC is doing. It'll help ease the mental anguish.

    camo_sig2.png
    I never finish anyth
  • RichyRichy Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    I dunno, I'd rather support the CRTC banning the practise of traffic shaping.

    First of all, it started because Bell was selling "flat-rate unlimited high-speed internet". When people took them up on their offer, the traffic started buckling their network, and they cheated their way out by covertly limiting it. That's not an acceptable business practise.

    And second, examining data packets to give priority to those originating from certain applications over those originating from other applications is such a blatantly dangerous slippery-slope idea that it should be banned. Say Bell comes out with its own paying phone-over-internet software. What do you think they'll do to those packets coming from their competitors' free softwares?

    RichyFlag.gifsig.gif
  • TubularLuggageTubularLuggage Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Exactly. Traffic shaping is a terrible practice, and if the CRTC were to ban it, it would honestly make up for a lot of the stupid shit they do.

  • emnmnmeemnmnme Heard about this on conservative radio:Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    I vote that we nuke Canada until Canadian producers decide to stop being so silly.

    easybossfight_zps4752c132.gif
  • ProtoProto Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    So essentially, producers and performers of Canadian media are worried about Canadians not watching their content on the internet, and so rather than actually producing something worth watching, they're calling for the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission to "regulate the internet".

    The only way I can even see something like this working is to block access to American shows and films to any Canadian internet users. The problem with this kind of protectionism is that, unlike many material goods, media isn't interchangeable. Someone who wants to watch a certain American program isn't going to just go watch some other show on CBC when they can't access the American show. It's not the same thing.

    Should countries try to block content from other countries for the purpose of promoting their own content, or should the internet remain an open exchange of media? I'm very much for the latter. I think if networks in a country want to compete, they have to make something people actually want to watch.


    Man, how did you all miss the major point so badly? It's not really regulation, it's a cash grab.
    The actors and the Directors Guild of Canada made separate recommendations calling for the creation of a $100-million fund for the production of Canadian content for new media.

    They want a levy in order to fund some cancon. Stupid and greedy, but not really regulation.

    and her knees up on the glove compartment
    took out her barrettes and her hair spilled out like rootbeer
  • RichyRichy Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    The ruling came out today! Pick your poison: CBC, Financial Post, Globe and Mail.

    Highlights of the conclusions:

    On whether the CRTC should impose regulations to increase Canadian content online: NO. Quote the CRTC chairman: "Any intervention on our part would only get in the way of innovation. "

    On whether the government should institute an ISP tax and give the money collected to the various actor, writer, director guilds: NO. The Alliance of Canadian Cinema, Television and Radio Artists is pissed, and already calling it the end of Canadian-produced content as we know it.

    On whether ISPs qualify as broadcasters and are therefore subject to the same rules on supporting Canadian content as TV and radio broadcasters: Handed to the Federal Court of Appeal to judge.

    On ISP network management policies (i.e. traffic shaping): Deferred to a separate hearing in July.

    Given the high pace of change in the online community, the decision is set to be reviewed in five years.


    Overall, a pretty good outcome :D

    RichyFlag.gifsig.gif
  • AegisAegis Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    We did something somewhat right! *waves a flag*

  • OlivawOlivaw good name, isn't it? peach treesRegistered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Aegis wrote: »
    We did something somewhat right! *waves a flag*

    Goddamn Canadians can't even fuck up properly

    7u0YG.gif
    PSN ID : DetectiveOlivaw | TWITTER | SCREENED | STEAM ID | BUY SOME STUFF!
  • DevoutlyApatheticDevoutlyApathetic I've Done Worse Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Canada is like some weird after school special where things work out like they're supposed to.

    Trogg wrote: »
    Not as positive as AIDS and cancer, but positive nonetheless.

    PSN: QuipFilter
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