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What are we reading?

1246778

Posts

  • DarkHawkeDarkHawke Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    I love the archaic langauge. I remember reading something about him "translating Severian's journals" and using words with nearly the same meaning or something. So he may not use the term horse because a destrier may not be a horse, despite what the dictionary suggests. A destrier may fulfill the same kind of role while being a different creature.

    Hell yes. Make sure to read the appendices as you go, rather than skipping forward like I did. They're very much a part of the plot.

  • NappuccinoNappuccino Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    @decibe: I'm really only cool with the idea of e-books if we get a code in purchased books to get the e-book for free... I don't really want to pay again if I can't find the book on an e-library...

    Also, I started reading Pynchon's Against the Day. I like it so far (seems easier to get into than Gravities Rainbow, a little harder than V. though...) but we'll see. Wish me luck :P

    Like to write? Want to get e-published? Give us a look-see at http://wednesdaynightwrites.com/
    Spoiler:
  • decibe11edecibe11e Registered User
    edited May 2009
    Nappuccino wrote: »
    @decibe: I'm really only cool with the idea of e-books if we get a code in purchased books to get the e-book for free... I don't really want to pay again if I can't find the book on an e-library...
    I totally agree. I'm pretty anti-DRM for anything, including software, and it seems especially ludicrous to me when applied to books. This is one reason I'm a huge fan of Project Gutenberg (a great place to read classic literature), and of Cory Doctorow, a cool sorta-post-cyberpunk author who releases all of his books online for free under a Creative Commons license as well as publishing them in the traditional fashion.

  • SilvoculousSilvoculous Registered User
    edited May 2009
    I'm reading Of Human Bondage, as was recommended earlier in this thread, and on High priority in my Amazon Wishlist is the entire Philip Marlowe series by Raymond Chandler. All of the accolades for his work were too much pressure to bear.

  • DarkHawkeDarkHawke Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Mike Stackpole's Once a Hero. Only about a quarter of the way through it so far, but it's neat - told in two time periods, each chapter having a partner in each period. One character does something 500 years ago, and you see the changes and consequences of his actions.

    Got the ebook off his site for four dollars.

  • FalhurkFalhurk Registered User
    edited May 2009
    Ken Kesey's One Flew Over a Cuckoo's Nest.

    I'm about thirty pages from the end of the story. Things really pick up from the second chapter onward. Quite a magnificent book.

  • IshbuIshbu Registered User
    edited May 2009
    Falhurk wrote: »
    Ken Kesey's One Flew Over a Cuckoo's Nest.

    I'm about thirty pages from the end of the story. Things really pick up from the second chapter onward. Quite a magnificent book.

    I loved it. Especially the clash of chaotic good and lawful evil that happens between McMurphy and Ratched. Both are amazing characters.

    On a related note, I may be thinking in terms of DnD too much.

    Play my game and serve beer to angry dwarves: The Tavern
  • FalhurkFalhurk Registered User
    edited May 2009
    Ishbu wrote: »
    Falhurk wrote: »
    Ken Kesey's One Flew Over a Cuckoo's Nest.

    I'm about thirty pages from the end of the story. Things really pick up from the second chapter onward. Quite a magnificent book.

    I loved it. Especially the clash of chaotic good and lawful evil that happens between McMurphy and Ratched. Both are amazing characters.

    On a related note, I may be thinking in terms of DnD too much.

    lol, fair enough.

    I am quite enjoying it myself. Although, I already know how it's going to end :'(

  • TisiphoneTisiphone Registered User
    edited May 2009
    I am currently on the second of the Malazan Book of the Fallen in an attempt to appease my mind while I wait for the next A Song of Ice and Fire book.

    Also kind of passively re-reading "Kiss Me Judas" before I ship it to Ireland for a friend to read who cannot seem to get a copy near him.

  • MunacraMunacra Registered User
    edited May 2009
    Currently reading the Brief wondrous life of oscar wao by Junot Diaz.

  • OfficiousGOfficiousG Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    EggyToast wrote: »
    I enjoyed American Gods quite a bit and am digging The Diamond Age. I'm somewhat interested in Cormac McCarthy's "western trilogy," but I've been so out of the loop that I'm actually kind of afraid of picking up new books, on the fear that they'll suck or I won't get into them. Last time I was reading a lot, I went through all the classics like Vonnegut, 1984, Lord of the Flies, Watership Down, some Steinbeck, and it was trying to read a Pynchon novel that made me lose interest in reading.

    Is this something that happened in your life, or a scene from American Gods? Like, wasn't the hero sitting at his mom's deathbed, reading Gravity's Rainbow, and he decided he didn't like books anymore?

    labsigbig.jpg
  • FalhurkFalhurk Registered User
    edited May 2009
    OfficiousG wrote: »
    EggyToast wrote: »
    I enjoyed American Gods quite a bit and am digging The Diamond Age. I'm somewhat interested in Cormac McCarthy's "western trilogy," but I've been so out of the loop that I'm actually kind of afraid of picking up new books, on the fear that they'll suck or I won't get into them. Last time I was reading a lot, I went through all the classics like Vonnegut, 1984, Lord of the Flies, Watership Down, some Steinbeck, and it was trying to read a Pynchon novel that made me lose interest in reading.

    Is this something that happened in your life, or a scene from American Gods? Like, wasn't the hero sitting at his mom's deathbed, reading Gravity's Rainbow, and he decided he didn't like books anymore?

    Semi-related. American Gods was an interesting read but Neverwhere really drew me in. If you haven't read it, I would strongly recommend you do. I've got that Pratchett/Gaiman novel Good Omens on my to-read pile also. I've been told it is also fantastic. Unfortunately I won't be able to get to it for quite some time, I have far too many books on that pile.

  • TisiphoneTisiphone Registered User
    edited May 2009
    Falhurk wrote: »
    Semi-related. American Gods was an interesting read but Neverwhere really drew me in. If you haven't read it, I would strongly recommend you do. I've got that Pratchett/Gaiman novel Good Omens on my to-read pile also. I've been told it is also fantastic. Unfortunately I won't be able to get to it for quite some time, I have far too many books on that pile.

    I have to say the opposite. Neverwhere didn't really pull me in as much as American Gods did. Good Omens was a great book as Gaiman and Pratchett tend to have a similar tongue-in-cheek offset by a serious tone in their writing so it seemed to work a bit better than some other collaborations turn out.

    If you end up liking Good Omens, I feel a natural progression is Christopher Moore's "Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff".

  • FalhurkFalhurk Registered User
    edited May 2009
    Tisiphone wrote: »
    Falhurk wrote: »
    Semi-related. American Gods was an interesting read but Neverwhere really drew me in. If you haven't read it, I would strongly recommend you do. I've got that Pratchett/Gaiman novel Good Omens on my to-read pile also. I've been told it is also fantastic. Unfortunately I won't be able to get to it for quite some time, I have far too many books on that pile.

    I have to say the opposite. Neverwhere didn't really pull me in as much as American Gods did. Good Omens was a great book as Gaiman and Pratchett tend to have a similar tongue-in-cheek offset by a serious tone in their writing so it seemed to work a bit better than some other collaborations turn out.

    If you end up liking Good Omens, I feel a natural progression is Christopher Moore's "Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff".

    I will certainly keep that in mind. I have heard that if you REALLY liked American Gods then you may not like most of Gaimans others stuff. The opposite also being true. I've very much enjoyed all of his works that I've read but I definitely would lean towards Neverwhere over American Gods. Funny how that works.

  • Grid SystemGrid System Registered User
    edited May 2009
    I haven't read anything by Gaiman, but I picked up American Gods the other day to see what all the fuss is about. Maybe I'll read it after I finish For Whom the Bell Tolls, which I started yesterday.

    Since I last posted in this thread, I've finished The Fifth Head of Cerberus, The Neverending Story, Shake Hands with the Devil, and The Chrysalids.

    Of course, that's little more than a ripple in the ever-widening river of books I have yet to read.

  • Squirrel NinjaSquirrel Ninja Registered User
    edited May 2009
    Right now I'm reading Murakami Haruki's short story collection Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman. I've been tearing through his books recently.

  • WankWank Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    I've been hitting the cyberpunk lately. All Tomorrow's Parties by Gibson and Thirteen by Richard K. Morgan.

  • DouglasDangerDouglasDanger Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Wank wrote: »
    I've been hitting the cyberpunk lately. All Tomorrow's Parties by Gibson and Thirteen by Richard K. Morgan.

    Have you read any of Morgan's Takeshi Kovacs books? The protagonist is just as much as comically macho badass, but I found the setting much more interesting.

    For post-cyberpunk military/spy space opera awesomeness with a slice of horror, you can't go wrong with Neal Asher's Polity books.

    I play games on ps3 and ps4. My PSN is DouglasDanger.
  • Just_Bri_ThanksJust_Bri_Thanks Seething with rage from a handbasket.Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited May 2009
    Just ordered Storm from the Shadows from bn.com with a gift card someone handed me. Out of pocket 3 bucks for the thing.

    Some days I just want to smack people with a rolled up newspaper. Or a phone book.
    A folding chair is looking like an attractive option right now too...
  • EggyToastEggyToast Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    OfficiousG wrote: »
    EggyToast wrote: »
    I enjoyed American Gods quite a bit and am digging The Diamond Age. I'm somewhat interested in Cormac McCarthy's "western trilogy," but I've been so out of the loop that I'm actually kind of afraid of picking up new books, on the fear that they'll suck or I won't get into them. Last time I was reading a lot, I went through all the classics like Vonnegut, 1984, Lord of the Flies, Watership Down, some Steinbeck, and it was trying to read a Pynchon novel that made me lose interest in reading.

    Is this something that happened in your life, or a scene from American Gods? Like, wasn't the hero sitting at his mom's deathbed, reading Gravity's Rainbow, and he decided he didn't like books anymore?

    Coincidentally, yes. Perhaps Pynchon has that effect on people?

    Seriously though, for me it was that in reading a lot of classics, I had reached my fill of "light" reading, and thought I wanted something denser. While I would argue that a great deal of books that are commonly read in high school may qualify as "light," they really are far more interesting when read as an adult, and after having a few more books under one's belt. But after burning through skinny paperbacks I picked up V. and Gravity's Rainbow and Mason & Dixon and read about 50 pages of each. They were cheap, at least.

    I finished up The Diamond Age yesterday and have moved on to The Road. My boss bought a kindle and has been lending it out to us employees over the last year, and after reading stuff on my iPhone I asked to be next. So I've been reading on that, and diggin' it. It's still not as convenient as the iPhone, though, due to the portability thing. I'm still reading more than I think I ever have in my life, though, and it's a good feeling.

    || Flickr — || PSN: EggyToast
  • Just_Bri_ThanksJust_Bri_Thanks Seething with rage from a handbasket.Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited May 2009
    My book arrived. If only Square Enix could be that fast.

    Some days I just want to smack people with a rolled up newspaper. Or a phone book.
    A folding chair is looking like an attractive option right now too...
  • ducknerdducknerd Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Hah, yeah, I don't think any human being could read two Pynchon books at once. I finished (or rather, read the last chapter of) Gravity's Rainbow yesterday, and while I loved parts of it, it was a real struggle and I still have no clue what large parts of it are about, which I think was deliberate on his part.

    Late to the party, but I also recently picked up Fight Club and am about halfway through. I have to wonder why it's not on every high school English curriculum; this is such a perfect book for studying writing as a teenager. How to make emotional impact, how to satirize and be sympathetic at the same time, taking an ironic perspective on typical teenage attitudes. Perfect.

  • MaticoreMaticore Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    ducknerd wrote: »
    Late to the party, but I also recently picked up Fight Club and am about halfway through. I have to wonder why it's not on every high school English curriculum; this is such a perfect book for studying writing as a teenager. How to make emotional impact, how to satirize and be sympathetic at the same time, taking an ironic perspective on typical teenage attitudes. Perfect.

    Because reading Palahnuik is like masturbation for teenagers, they don't get it, but they know it feels good to do.

  • Just_Bri_ThanksJust_Bri_Thanks Seething with rage from a handbasket.Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited May 2009
    OK, finished reading it. And the next one isn't even on the schedule yet, damnit.

    Some days I just want to smack people with a rolled up newspaper. Or a phone book.
    A folding chair is looking like an attractive option right now too...
  • Alchemist449Alchemist449 Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Maticore wrote: »
    ducknerd wrote: »
    Late to the party, but I also recently picked up Fight Club and am about halfway through. I have to wonder why it's not on every high school English curriculum; this is such a perfect book for studying writing as a teenager. How to make emotional impact, how to satirize and be sympathetic at the same time, taking an ironic perspective on typical teenage attitudes. Perfect.

    Because reading Palahnuik is like masturbation for teenagers, they don't get it, but they know it feels good to do.

    The main difference being if you read to many books by Palanhuik you will actually go blind.

    Snork
  • ducknerdducknerd Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    I think they have a better sense of irony than that. Or, if they don't, give the brats the essay prompt "What is Tyler Durden's personal philosophy?" and watch them squirm.

  • MaticoreMaticore Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    I don't think they stand a chance, the buddhism and such behind fight club is way too involved for high schoolers. Now, having them READ palahnuik would be a step forward, don't get me wrong, because high schools could really benefit from some literature published this century.

  • ReckonerReckoner Registered User
    edited May 2009
    Last night, I finished reading "The Book of Illusions" by Paul Auster. It is a good romance, no doubt on that, with a good story and many dramatic scenes, but the first pages and some moments near the end are a little boring comparing to the rest of the book. I recommend it to anyone who likes this kind of books, but never give up on reading it in the boring parts, because that means that a high moment is slowly coming!;-)

    Anyway, has anyone here read this book?:P

  • Just_Bri_ThanksJust_Bri_Thanks Seething with rage from a handbasket.Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited May 2009
    So I have no idea what to read next. I am part of the way though the first book in ice and fire, but it hasn't really hooked me. Yes, no, maybe?

    Some days I just want to smack people with a rolled up newspaper. Or a phone book.
    A folding chair is looking like an attractive option right now too...
  • Metal Gear Solid 2 DemoMetal Gear Solid 2 Demo Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    I'm catching up on some Hugos I promised I would read and am about half way through A Canticle for Leibowitz

    It's really good, though not enjoying the second half as much as the first. I really wish I could find an illuminated print of a circuit design for a wallpaper or poster

    Spoiler:
  • Just_Bri_ThanksJust_Bri_Thanks Seething with rage from a handbasket.Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited May 2009
    Bottom paged again. Color me surprised.

    Some days I just want to smack people with a rolled up newspaper. Or a phone book.
    A folding chair is looking like an attractive option right now too...
  • Metal Gear Solid 2 DemoMetal Gear Solid 2 Demo Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Finish the first book, I think you'll be hooked once you hit the...reveal

    Spoiler:
  • Dublo7Dublo7 Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    I'm catching up on some Hugos I promised I would read and am about half way through A Canticle for Leibowitz

    It's really good, though not enjoying the second half as much as the first. I really wish I could find an illuminated print of a circuit design for a wallpaper or poster

    A Canticle for Leibowitz is pretty damn amazing.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Just_Bri_ThanksJust_Bri_Thanks Seething with rage from a handbasket.Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited May 2009
    Finish the first book, I think you'll be hooked once you hit the...reveal

    I'll put more effort into it, thanks.

    Some days I just want to smack people with a rolled up newspaper. Or a phone book.
    A folding chair is looking like an attractive option right now too...
  • Dublo7Dublo7 Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    I'm just over half-way through The Guermantes Way by Marcel Proust. I'm enjoying almost as much as I enjoyed Swann's Way.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • DouglasDangerDouglasDanger Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    I'm not sure what I read today in Sword of the Lictor. Severian went to a party, boned some lady while she gave him a history lesson and then that lady was arrested or something. I don't understand who she was meant to be.

    I play games on ps3 and ps4. My PSN is DouglasDanger.
  • BogartBogart Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Douglas, if memory serves, that woman's identity is explained in the text (possibly this is done after the party). If it isn't, then I'm pretty sure she's
    Spoiler:

    Snork
  • DouglasDangerDouglasDanger Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Hmm. Reading before bed is perhaps not the best idea for this book.

    I play games on ps3 and ps4. My PSN is DouglasDanger.
  • FalhurkFalhurk Registered User
    edited May 2009
    Alright, I finished One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest last night. Fantastic book, a bit dissapointed with the abrupt ending. A lot of things happened. I think I'll have to re-read the book, though I have a lot that I want to read first.

    Just started and got through the first chapter in The Great Gatsby. Hmmm.

  • MaticoreMaticore Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Falhurk wrote: »
    Just started and got through the first chapter in The Great Gatsby. Hmmm.

    Give it a few chapters before passing judgment. In fact, finish it. Do your best not to give up, because I know a few people who didn't like it until they finished it.

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