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What are we reading?

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Posts

  • VanityPantsVanityPants Gokai Red! Registered User regular
    ToddJewell wrote:
    I've heard the Dresden Files novels get exponentially better as the series progresses, especially after book 3.

    I quit midway through book three... guess that means I should get it again?

    I read book 4 and while it was at least BETTER it wasn't good enough to keep me reading beyond that, soo.

  • CheeselikerCheeseliker Registered User regular
    The Millenium Series is fantastic. Just finished it.

  • The WalrusThe Walrus ChicagoRegistered User regular
    Finally got a copy of Roadside Picnic by the Brothers Strugatsky. Very Russian, pulpy, and good throughout. If you enjoyed Stalker definitely check it out (if you can find it, I had to go through Amazon UK) although the film and games are only loosely affiliated.

    http://wreck-age.net Home of your soon to be favorite post-collapse, dystopian, SF Table Top Strategy game & RPG

    http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/hyacinthgames/a-tabletop-rpg-and-board-games-project-from-chicag
  • The WalrusThe Walrus ChicagoRegistered User regular
    edited December 2011
    Great, a TRIPLE post! :(

    The Walrus on
    http://wreck-age.net Home of your soon to be favorite post-collapse, dystopian, SF Table Top Strategy game & RPG

    http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/hyacinthgames/a-tabletop-rpg-and-board-games-project-from-chicag
  • THESPOOKYTHESPOOKY I'm the same Jeff as ever! Star Wars! Registered User regular
    Just finished A Dance With Dragons.

    Fuck you George R R Martin.

    MAJOR
    Spoiler:

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  • KeiosKeios Registered User
    I'm just re-reading my favourite of Iain M. Banks' Culture novels, Excession, while I wait for Amazon to get round to delivering me a copy of the latest one, Surface Detail.

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  • SkutSkutSkutSkut Registered User regular
    Just started Dracula, read the first chapter liking it so far.

  • ToddJewellToddJewell Registered User regular
    read first book of hunger games trilogy -- eh? I guess it is ok? I have to read the next two since both of my brothers and my mother in law have read them but I don't really feel like it is necessary.

    I also read the Tim Tebow autobiography. There are some interesting tidbits in there but overall it isn't very good.

  • LogIntoMordorLogIntoMordor Registered User
    Everybody, I beg of you, dip into 'If on a winters night a traveler' by Italo Calvino. Or 'One hundred years of solitude' by Gabriel Garcia Marquez. My father recommended both to me recently and after reading them I can say confidently that they are the two best pieces of literature on earth. At least, that I've read so far.

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  • VanityPantsVanityPants Gokai Red! Registered User regular
    I'm sad to say the only Italo Calvino I've read is his book of Italian Folktales, but I've been wanting to pick up If On A Winters...

  • MagellMagell Sphinx! Parts UnknownRegistered User regular
    I'm sad to say the only Italo Calvino I've read is his book of Italian Folktales, but I've been wanting to pick up If On A Winters...

    It's a good book. I wouldn't call it one of the two best pieces of literature ever, but it's well worth reading. I've read it twice and enjoyed it both times.

  • vamenvamen Registered User regular
    I'm rereading "The Briar King" which I read about 9 years ago. I really enjoyed it at the time but I forgot all about the series and never even read the sequel. Apparently the series is finished so I thought it'd be a good time to pick it back up and read the whole thing.

    It's funny, there's a scene in it that has been very vivid in my mind for years, but when I reread it, the scene was completely different (aside from the general location) than I recall. Crazy memory.

    Warning if anyone gets this on Kindle; the kindle version has ALL sorts of horrible errors. Random hyphens in words, missing paragraph breaks, tons of misspelled words. I really wish they'd add some sort of quality control for Kindle books. It's not been quite enough to make me put the book down, but it's been close.

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  • CptHamiltonCptHamilton Registered User regular
    Finally started on Snuff. I'm not sure what it is about this one, but I feel like the prose isn't as smooth as Pratchett's other work. Every time I pick it up I find myself thinking that his writing feels kind of...clunky, and I find it easier to put down than any Discworld book I can recall since his stuff prior to Guards! Guards!. I may just be projecting my fear of his disease impacting his work onto said work, though. It's still a fun story.

    OptimusZed wrote:
    Hey, you're that guy with me in your sig. -- (was: 'Jesus, people. This thread is like a running gunbattle with stupid bullets.' -- OptimusZed)
  • reddogreddog Registered User regular
    Finally finished Storm of Swords and now going on A Feast For Crows on my new Kindle. While I'm only about 60 pages in, I'm feeling that I'm having to push through this one. I hate it when he introduces new characters that have more than one name; it gets confusing. Here's hoping it starts to move along!

    This is one of the first books i'm reading on my Kindle and I'm finding i'm reading faster than normal. Anyone notice this happens with them?

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  • KamarKamar Registered User regular
    reddog wrote:
    Finally finished Storm of Swords and now going on A Feast For Crows on my new Kindle. While I'm only about 60 pages in, I'm feeling that I'm having to push through this one. I hate it when he introduces new characters that have more than one name; it gets confusing. Here's hoping it starts to move along!

    This is one of the first books i'm reading on my Kindle and I'm finding i'm reading faster than normal. Anyone notice this happens with them?

    If you read fast enough, turning pages on a physical book can slow you down a noticeable amount. There might be other factors at work, too, but that's been my experience.

  • TheBigEasyTheBigEasy Registered User regular
    I recently read Shaq's autobiography ... interesting book.

    Now a friend lent me "Day of the Triffids" ... apparently the inspiration for "28 days later". Anyone read that?

  • nataliepinataliepi Registered User regular
    Just finished A Discovery of Witches by Deborah Harkness. Loved every bit of it! Can't wait for the second book in the trilogy to be released. July is too far away!

    PAX East 2013 Checklist: 3-Day PAX Badge [x] Hotel [x] Travel [x] Time Off [x]
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  • liquiddarkliquiddark Odd magpie St. John's, NLRegistered User regular
    edited January 2012
    Most of the way through Ganymede, the third book in Cherie Priest's steampunk series. It's not bad, mostly effortless to read, but having just finished China Mieville's Perdido Street Station, this one left me pretty unsatisfied so far. Also reading the movie edition of Asimov's I, Robot antholonovel, which is much the same level. Most of the way through Kim Stanley Robinson's Years of Rice and Salt, which is a gorgeous book. And I picked up Niven's Footfall on the Kindle because a friend suggested the premise is useful. I keep thinking I should pick up Dance of Dragons but Feast for Crows made me tired. I've got Hofstadter's I Am A Strange Loop and Nietzsche's Man and Superman[/i] and about a million small press chapbooks waiting for me when I have the mental energy.

    liquiddark on
    Current project: Contension, a realtime tactics game for mobile
    @oldmanhero .programming .web comic .everything
  • cabbagesquirrelcabbagesquirrel Registered User
    Hyperion and its sequel, then I'll probably get Endymion and its sequel. Needed my sci-fi fix after all the Pratchett fantasy.

  • ruzkinruzkin Registered User regular
    Reading Larry Niven's "A World Out Of Time" at the moment. Truly wonderful.

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  • chiasaur11chiasaur11 Never doubt a raccoon. Registered User regular
    edited January 2012
    Chesterton's autobiography for me right now.

    That man could write, obviously, but he could think (which is generally a similar plus) just as well without losing a sense of humor about himself.

    And, considering he died in '36, it's surprisingly prescient for WWII. Didn't expect that, honestly.

    chiasaur11 on
  • CheeselikerCheeseliker Registered User regular
    TheBigEasy wrote:
    I recently read Shaq's autobiography ... interesting book.

    Now a friend lent me "Day of the Triffids" ... apparently the inspiration for "28 days later". Anyone read that?

    Really? I love 28 days later. I may have to check that out.

  • Pereza0Pereza0 Registered User regular
    TheBigEasy wrote:
    I recently read Shaq's autobiography ... interesting book.

    Now a friend lent me "Day of the Triffids" ... apparently the inspiration for "28 days later". Anyone read that?

    Really? I love 28 days later. I may have to check that out.

    only the zombies are plants, they are smart and have poisonous stings.

    the thing that could make it similar to 28dl is the fact the main character wakes up and its already been the apocalypse, then the few non-dead non-handicapped(read to find out) gather and try, well, to survive. I think this is the first two chapters or so, not spoiling much

    read it like 4 years ago, so i dont remember much. I was 14-15 and I liked it a lot back then, but i dont know if id like it now

  • MagellMagell Sphinx! Parts UnknownRegistered User regular
    I've recently read Brandon Sanderson's Elantris and I enjoyed it a lot. A really interesting fantasy novel and a good read.

    Yesterday I finished Patrick Rothfuss' The Name of the Wind and I did not care for it. Holy crap I don't think the story actually shows up in this first novel of probably a trilogy, Some parts are interesting, but it definitely could have stood to lose around 200 pages and sped through some stuff to get somewhere interesting and actually showing Kvothe doing something that made him the hero he apparently is in the world. Shit, it couldn't even finish the story of Kvothe in University.

  • CheeselikerCheeseliker Registered User regular
    Magell wrote:
    I've recently read Brandon Sanderson's Elantris and I enjoyed it a lot. A really interesting fantasy novel and a good read.

    Yesterday I finished Patrick Rothfuss' The Name of the Wind and I did not care for it. Holy crap I don't think the story actually shows up in this first novel of probably a trilogy, Some parts are interesting, but it definitely could have stood to lose around 200 pages and sped through some stuff to get somewhere interesting and actually showing Kvothe doing something that made him the hero he apparently is in the world. Shit, it couldn't even finish the story of Kvothe in University.

    I completely disagree. The 'story' is about Kvothe, so I don't understand how the story doesn't show up in the first novel, when it is about him...Yes he doesn't shoot fireballs out of his nostrils but I found the stories of his life interesting and well-written, whether he was an orphan in the city or a student at the academy, I enjoyed the story. The magic system is unique and well thought out as well. I don't know, differing opinions obviously but I loved both this and the next novel about Kvothe.

  • TheBigEasyTheBigEasy Registered User regular
    Haven't started Days of the Triffids yet, but for my birthday I got Steven Kings "On Writing" ... and James Morrows "Towing Jehovah". The premise sounds very weird, which is right up my alley ...
    The discovery of God's corpse in the mid-Atlantic poses a menace to navigation and to faith. Charged with captaining a supertanker as it tows the two-mile long corpse northward to the Arctic so that it can be preserved, Anthony Van Horne must contend with sabotage (both natural and spiritual) and mutiny along the way. An allegorical tale certain to entertain and provoke.

  • KurneaKurnea Registered User
    Currently reading 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami. The book is about two main characters, a Japanese man and woman, who are both somehow connected to a parallel world where history is slightly different and has two moons. In typical Murakami style, the main draw is the characters, all of whom are unique and interesting. You have a talented cram teacher/fantasy author who's dragged into co-writing a story, and you also have a young female who is a physical education instructor who also carries out assassinations on spousal abusers. Really interesting thus far.

  • KamarKamar Registered User regular
    Trying to decide if I should try Tad Williams 'Otherland' cyberpunk series. His fantasy series was so boring I didn't finish it, but his problems there feel like things that might disappear in another genre. Anyone read these?

  • chiasaur11chiasaur11 Never doubt a raccoon. Registered User regular
    TheBigEasy wrote:
    Haven't started Days of the Triffids yet, but for my birthday I got Steven Kings "On Writing" ... and James Morrows "Towing Jehovah". The premise sounds very weird, which is right up my alley ...
    The discovery of God's corpse in the mid-Atlantic poses a menace to navigation and to faith. Charged with captaining a supertanker as it tows the two-mile long corpse northward to the Arctic so that it can be preserved, Anthony Van Horne must contend with sabotage (both natural and spiritual) and mutiny along the way. An allegorical tale certain to entertain and provoke.

    Bad news for the second. Apparently, it sucks.

    Good new for "On Writing". It is amazingly good.

  • TheBigEasyTheBigEasy Registered User regular
    chiasaur11 wrote:
    Good new for "On Writing". It is amazingly good.

    Yeah ... I already read it years ago, but in the German translation. I have never read a book of Steven King, but just reading this I could see why he usually sells like hot cake. Dude can flat out write ...

  • KurneaKurnea Registered User
    For anyone reading this on January 19th, apparently American Gods: 10th Anniversary Edition is on sale for $1.99 on Kindle and Nook, but I think it's today only. If you've ever wondered what all the fuss about Neil Gaiman is over, this would be a good place to start.

  • KamarKamar Registered User regular
    On Writing is pretty great. My only complaint would be that he's adamantly anti-outline while being a perfect example of why some sort of outline is good (his terrible endings).

  • ToddJewellToddJewell Registered User regular
    speaking of king, reading 'The Gunslinger' -- tried to read it awhile ago but couldn't get into it, able to get into it this time for some reason. I must have had too many distractions when I tried previously. Parts of it are confusing though since it mentions Tull and him having killed everyone there and then 20 pages later he is in Tull and killing people? I haven't gotten beyond that part so maybe it is a dream of some sort or a recollection, but I didn't see it prefaced with anything of that fashion.

  • ruzkinruzkin Registered User regular
    Magell wrote:
    I've recently read Brandon Sanderson's Elantris and I enjoyed it a lot. A really interesting fantasy novel and a good read.

    Yesterday I finished Patrick Rothfuss' The Name of the Wind and I did not care for it. Holy crap I don't think the story actually shows up in this first novel of probably a trilogy, Some parts are interesting, but it definitely could have stood to lose around 200 pages and sped through some stuff to get somewhere interesting and actually showing Kvothe doing something that made him the hero he apparently is in the world. Shit, it couldn't even finish the story of Kvothe in University.

    I completely disagree. The 'story' is about Kvothe, so I don't understand how the story doesn't show up in the first novel, when it is about him...Yes he doesn't shoot fireballs out of his nostrils but I found the stories of his life interesting and well-written, whether he was an orphan in the city or a student at the academy, I enjoyed the story. The magic system is unique and well thought out as well. I don't know, differing opinions obviously but I loved both this and the next novel about Kvothe.

    Magell - I agree completely. The Name of the Wind is the most absurdly over-hyped fantasy series of the last few decades. There is no story to speak of, and Kvothe is a fucking terrible character in every way.

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  • ruzkinruzkin Registered User regular
    Kamar wrote:
    Trying to decide if I should try Tad Williams 'Otherland' cyberpunk series. His fantasy series was so boring I didn't finish it, but his problems there feel like things that might disappear in another genre. Anyone read these?

    I'm reading Otherland book 2 at the moment. The story is great, but the book is seriously twice as long as it needs to be. Once I started just skipping entire paragraphs of description and character's feelings, I started to love it. As soon as I slowed down and tried to take in every word, I began to rage.

    KqOm9Bt.jpg
  • KamarKamar Registered User regular
    ruzkin wrote:
    Magell wrote:
    I've recently read Brandon Sanderson's Elantris and I enjoyed it a lot. A really interesting fantasy novel and a good read.

    Yesterday I finished Patrick Rothfuss' The Name of the Wind and I did not care for it. Holy crap I don't think the story actually shows up in this first novel of probably a trilogy, Some parts are interesting, but it definitely could have stood to lose around 200 pages and sped through some stuff to get somewhere interesting and actually showing Kvothe doing something that made him the hero he apparently is in the world. Shit, it couldn't even finish the story of Kvothe in University.

    I completely disagree. The 'story' is about Kvothe, so I don't understand how the story doesn't show up in the first novel, when it is about him...Yes he doesn't shoot fireballs out of his nostrils but I found the stories of his life interesting and well-written, whether he was an orphan in the city or a student at the academy, I enjoyed the story. The magic system is unique and well thought out as well. I don't know, differing opinions obviously but I loved both this and the next novel about Kvothe.

    Magell - I agree completely. The Name of the Wind is the most absurdly over-hyped fantasy series of the last few decades. There is no story to speak of, and Kvothe is a fucking terrible character in every way.

    I really enjoy The Name of the Wind, but Rothfuss' editor should be dragged out behind a barn and shot for letting so unpolished and bloated a book get published.

  • VanityPantsVanityPants Gokai Red! Registered User regular
    ruzkin wrote:
    Magell wrote:
    I've recently read Brandon Sanderson's Elantris and I enjoyed it a lot. A really interesting fantasy novel and a good read.

    Yesterday I finished Patrick Rothfuss' The Name of the Wind and I did not care for it. Holy crap I don't think the story actually shows up in this first novel of probably a trilogy, Some parts are interesting, but it definitely could have stood to lose around 200 pages and sped through some stuff to get somewhere interesting and actually showing Kvothe doing something that made him the hero he apparently is in the world. Shit, it couldn't even finish the story of Kvothe in University.

    I completely disagree. The 'story' is about Kvothe, so I don't understand how the story doesn't show up in the first novel, when it is about him...Yes he doesn't shoot fireballs out of his nostrils but I found the stories of his life interesting and well-written, whether he was an orphan in the city or a student at the academy, I enjoyed the story. The magic system is unique and well thought out as well. I don't know, differing opinions obviously but I loved both this and the next novel about Kvothe.

    Magell - I agree completely. The Name of the Wind is the most absurdly over-hyped fantasy series of the last few decades. There is no story to speak of, and Kvothe is a fucking terrible character in every way.

    I really do enjoy Rothfuss' writing and I think if you read them as the story just being about this guy like Cheese says rather than what the plot of the books is actually supposed to be, they're much better. The thing is there IS a story that isn't about Kvothe and it's brought up right at the start of the book and then not really mentioned again in any way until the second half of the second book.

    And they could both be trimmed by at least half of their length/400 pages and be much better reads.

    All that said, I really do enjoy Rothfuss' writing and I like the world he's building and everything. The books have a lot of technical problems but I think they have a lot of heart, too, and that makes up for the other errors for me. At least enough that I enjoy reading them and look forward to the next book.

    Of course, anyone ever in the IRC knows I'm not shy to go off on raging tangents about the problems they have as well, sooo.

    Anyway! I'm currently reading The Passage, which I'm only about 100 pages into but I'm really enjoying. It's taking me forever to get through it, though, and I'm not sure why. Hopefully it picks up for me soon because otherwise I'm liking it.

  • setrajonassetrajonas Registered User regular
    Just finished reading the Sprawl trilogy. I read Neuromancer a long time ago actually, but my appreciation for it went way up on this re-read, in part because I can only now recognize just how big a cultural influence it was. Count Zero and Mona Lisa Overdrive were a bit strange, like two halves of the same book to which Neuromancer was a prequel. They were good, but a re-read is in order in the future before I can settle my mind about them.

    Now I'm reading a Flannery O'Connor collection, starting with the short stories, Distrust That Particular Flavor, and Maine. Flannery O'Connor so far reminds me of the Coen Brothers. Something about the southern dialect, stark and alien settings, the sudden violence in some of the stories. I would love to see what they could do with A Good Man Is Hard To Find.

    Maine I struggled with at first. Between the review blurbs plastering the dust jacket and the first 30 something pages, it was verging on being one of those sappy "dysfunctional families torn apart and brought back together by their familial love" stories which make me want to go read something else. I soldiered on for another 100 pages or so, and more hate seems to be flowing. Then I went to read some reviews on Amazon and people were disappointed that the story wasn't happy/uplifting/funny (it is actually grimly funny at points if you ask me) like the blurbs implied. So I guess I'll read the rest of it. I actually like the technical aspects of the book. Her descriptions of Maine itself and each character's life and personality are vivid and distinct. Too bad most of the family are terrible people. With any luck, it'll all end with the House of Usher.

  • CSMCSM Registered User
    Finally managed to get in to Stephen King's Dark Tower series. I've tried several times in the past to read Gunslinger, but couldn't get in to it. Then, just after Xmas, I had an afternoon to kill and it was, somehow, once again the top thin on my "to read" pile. Glad I gave it another shot in the end - Gunslinger takes a while to get going but Drawing of the Three (book 2 in the series) is just brilliant! Got the next one on order already.

  • CSMCSM Registered User
    edited January 2012
    ToddJewell wrote:
    speaking of king, reading 'The Gunslinger' -- tried to read it awhile ago but couldn't get into it, able to get into it this time for some reason. I must have had too many distractions when I tried previously. Parts of it are confusing though since it mentions Tull and him having killed everyone there and then 20 pages later he is in Tull and killing people? I haven't gotten beyond that part so maybe it is a dream of some sort or a recollection, but I didn't see it prefaced with anything of that fashion.

    As mentioned above, I've had problems with Gunslinger on previous attempts at it.
    When it goes over the events in Tull, it's actually Roland telling them to the dude who lives in the shack growing beans, the one with the crow that talks.

    CSM on
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