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What are we reading?

13468978

Posts

  • cshadow42cshadow42 Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    "The Road" by Cormac McCarthy. Then "Let the Right One in" by John Ajvide Lindqvist. I prefer to read the novels before watching the movies that are based on them.

    I saw the trailer for the movie version they're doing of "The Road". It has some minor spoilers in it, though I haven't finished the book so I can't tell if the spoilers are for the book or the movie, or both.

    I really wish movie trailers would stop putting so many spoilers in them. For instance, I think I would've been much more impressed with Terminator Salvation if I hadn't known Sam Worthington was a machine.

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  • FandyienFandyien But Otto, what about us? Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    jacripe wrote: »
    Presently reading The Dharma Bums by Jack Kerouac. It's very odd to move to this from One Flew Over and The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. The optimistic/feel good nature of it is sort of throwing me off. It feels like there's no real conflict in the story yet. As a result, it's been rather slow reading. I need to hurry up and finish it so I can move on to something with drugs in it again.

    I could never finish Dharma Bums. It was just so much less engaging then On The Road.

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  • RazielRaziel Registered User
    edited June 2009
    That's because it was Kerouac's twilight years of gout and misunderstanding buddhism. It's like a stockbroker growing a ponytail and developing an interest in hiking.

    Edit: I am reading a 600-page collection of Charles Darwin's crap. Why? I don't know. I just... don't know.

    Read the mad blog-rantings of a manic hack writer here.

    Thank you, Rubacava!
  • DissociaterDissociater Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    I'm reading the following:
    Spoiler:

    Probably my favorite book series of all time.

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  • MaticoreMaticore Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    why is Edward P. Jones such a good writer?

    WHY?

  • ZachardeZacharde Registered User
    edited June 2009
    Neil Gaiman's, Smoke and Mirrors.

    Loving it.

    "For future reference, I was sort of hoping for a suggestion that didn't sound like it came from that Bolshevik Muppet with all the dynamite."
  • A Dabble Of TheloniusA Dabble Of Thelonius It has been a doozy of a dayRegistered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Gaiman's short stories are his best work. Much like Stephen King (don't stone me) when he keeps it short, he gets bigger payoffs.

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  • DouglasDangerDouglasDanger Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    The Sword of the Lictor is still really great.

    I play games on ps3 and ps4. My PSN is DouglasDanger.
  • DarksierDarksier Registered User
    edited June 2009
    I enjoyed Wolfe's series though I got lost in the second half. Ended up reading the last of the series during breaks at work which just didn't work with his writing style. I'll have to go back to that series, but for now I'm finishing the surprisingly entertaining Ciaphas Cain series by Sandy Mitchell.

  • KabbageKabbage Registered User
    edited June 2009
    Just finished Zadie Smith's White Teeth, a 450+ page bastard that's easily my favorite novel of all time. Smith's writing style is brutally insightful, and genuinely funny at once, with this free-wheeling take on the English language that makes it all flow amazingly well. History, fundamentalist thinking, tradition, modern colonialism are put up against an uncaring, unbending reality, and the whole thing's framed in a tight, enjoyable story of two friends from World War 2 raising their families in today's London.

    Awesome, awesome stuff.

  • IshbuIshbu Registered User
    edited June 2009
    Is The Stand worth reading?

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  • NeogiNeogi Registered User
    edited June 2009
    I like King's Darktower stuff, but I always come back to Jim Butcher for my magical fix,


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  • A Dabble Of TheloniusA Dabble Of Thelonius It has been a doozy of a dayRegistered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Ishbu wrote: »
    Is The Stand worth reading?

    Yes.

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  • albumoftheyearalbumoftheyear Registered User
    edited June 2009
    I'm going through Demon Theory by Stephen Graham Jones

  • RingoRingo Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Ishbu wrote: »
    Is The Stand worth reading?

    Yes.

    Definitely

    ceres wrote: »
    I'm just going to go ahead and lock this thread before I feel any worse about humanity.
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  • joshgotrojoshgotro Bloat much? Cincinnati, OhioRegistered User regular
    edited June 2009
    What about The Gunslinger?

    I bought it already. It better be good.

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  • ducknerdducknerd Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    House of Leaves, for the second time. This time I'm annotating it. Way too much fun.

  • ruzkinruzkin Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Ringo wrote: »
    Ishbu wrote: »
    Is The Stand worth reading?

    Yes.

    Definitely

    Dunno, I've given up on it twice. 600 pages in and I've lost track of the plethora of characters and pointless scenes. i think at one point old Mother Abagail had a 20 or 30 page flashback and that was when I realised King needs a more hard-nosed editor.

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  • DouglasDangerDouglasDanger Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    joshgotro wrote: »
    What about The Gunslinger?

    I bought it already. It better be good.

    I thought the Gunslinger was pretty great. The first three or so books in the Dark Tower were really good, in my opinion.

    I play games on ps3 and ps4. My PSN is DouglasDanger.
  • zenpotatozenpotato Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    ruzkin wrote: »
    Ringo wrote: »
    Ishbu wrote: »
    Is The Stand worth reading?

    Yes.

    Definitely

    Dunno, I've given up on it twice. 600 pages in and I've lost track of the plethora of characters and pointless scenes. i think at one point old Mother Abagail had a 20 or 30 page flashback and that was when I realised King needs a more hard-nosed editor.

    It's pretty easy to spot where King loses control of the novel. It meanders for awhile, before a sudden change towards a conclusion. It's interesting to read him talk about what writing that novel was like. I think it's brought up in On Writing.

  • DarkHawkeDarkHawke Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    That story in On Writing is what made me abandon King's just-go-ahead-and-write approach in favour of more robust outlining.

    I'm reading Brandon Sanderson's warbreaker, which he released for free on his site prior to its release. It's pretty neat, and it's a single volume fantasy which is something I appreciate.

  • Grid SystemGrid System Registered User
    edited June 2009
    Started reading The Dying Earth yesterday. Holy crap is it ever fun. Just balls-to-the-wall fantasy adventure that makes no apologies.

  • BerenBeren Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Consider the Lobster by David Foster Wallace.

    The entire first essay is about porn.

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  • Edgler VessEdgler Vess Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    1984

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  • Gravity and PunishmentGravity and Punishment Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    I am currently in between A New Green History of The World by Clive Ponting and City of Thieves by David Benioff.

    I'm only about 10 pages into each, but they're both awesome so far.

    I just finished both Culture of Fear by Barry Glassner and The Geography of Nowhere by James Howard Kunstler. Fucking phenomenal.

    "I assure you, your distaste only reveals your ignorance."
  • DarkHawkeDarkHawke Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Started reading The Dying Earth yesterday. Holy crap is it ever fun. Just balls-to-the-wall fantasy adventure that makes no apologies.

    Have you checked out any Fritz Lieber stuff? I have a big collection of Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser stories that I dive into whenever the mood strikes.

  • Grid SystemGrid System Registered User
    edited June 2009
    I have not, but manybooks has some stuff up, so I may take a look if I ever get around to it :P

  • sgt scruffiansgt scruffian Registered User
    edited June 2009
    Reading Clive Barker's Weaveworld right now. It's a good read, but can be very gross and graphic some times. Barker is a weird dude.

    Spoiler:
  • slacktronslacktron Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Beren wrote: »
    Consider the Lobster by David Foster Wallace.

    I read that, too, on the recommendation of Robert Ashley from the Out of the Game Podcast.
    It's about a 40 minute read and can be read for free here at gourmet.com.

    The paper-book reading I've been doing is Game Boys: Professional Videogaming's Rise from the Basement to the Big Time by Michael Kane (not the actor).

    Although nonfiction, the writing style is anything but dry, focusing on the personalities in the top two USA counter-strike teams as they compete for a slice of the miniscule economic pie. What fuels them is not economics so much as raw competitiveness and the belief that what they find so compelling about the game can translate to a larger audience, either through television or spectator events.

    Another strength of the book are Kane's insights into the larger personalities and finding a memorable metaphor for them. For instance, the observation that CPL founder Angel Munoz wears suits with contrasting lines and dots, and that his house is designed with a half angular, half rounded sensibility that illustrates his worldview of clashing X's vs. O's. Similarly, coach Lake's house sits a little higher and is a little larger than the others on his street, underscoring his constant desire to be just a little better than any competition.

    Although I haven't finished, a glaring weakness in the story thus far is that it has focused on the managers, organizers, and coaches, while not giving any great insight into what kind of psychology it takes to dedicate eight hours a day, six days a week to playing the same game. Often, this is done in conjunction with, or at the sacrifice of, collegiate studies. Even world class players don't earn much more than a shift manager, so you have to ask why they do it. Maybe it's because these guys are a tight-lipped bunch, but the unwritten message seems to be that somebody who spends that much time in front of a computer screen is boring, which I refuse to believe. I mean, professional athletes spend just as much time in the gym or practice, yet their quirks, enhanced by a high-pressure job, make for great copy. I'm hoping Kane gets to that, as he has been working toward establishing the parallel between sports and video games since page one.

    A good book, though. I don't think I've been this jazzed about nonfiction since Wolfe's The Right Stuff.

  • Munkus BeaverMunkus Beaver Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited June 2009
    I am reading Good Omens for the fourth time.

    God, I need to find some new books that are witty like pratchett

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  • DaraDara Registered User
    edited June 2009
    Cannery Row, which is great.

  • DouglasDangerDouglasDanger Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    I'm getting pretty close to finishing The Sword of the Lictor, the third part of the Book of the New Sun. It's building towards a ridiculous climax. But it isnt ridiculous within the story. When you try to tell someone about it, it sounds ridiculous. When you read it, it is right.

    I play games on ps3 and ps4. My PSN is DouglasDanger.
  • ducknerdducknerd Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Pharmakon, by Dirk Wittenborn. I think it might have been a mistake. Incredible subject--it covers the (completely fictional, I'm pretty sure) family of a psychiatrist who develops happiness pills between the 1950s and 1990s--but he's a pretty weak writer.

  • LegbaLegba Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Around The World In Eighty Days, by Jules Verne.

    It's nowhere near as good as I expected, unfortunately.

  • Lia ParkerLia Parker __BANNED USERS
    edited June 2009
    This comic is one of the best that I have ever read.

  • NoahnautNoahnaut Registered User
    edited June 2009
    I just finished John C. Wright's "The Golden Age" trilogy yesterday. Spectacular, philosophical space-opera. Really wonderful. It actually had a good ending, which is a miracle in any novel that's over 1000 pages long.

    Now I have no idea what I'm going to read... It's always a stuggle.

    I'm leaning towards some Vernor Vinge, since I've never actually read a novel of his. I have A Fire Upon the Deep, but the plot of Rainbow's End intrigues me more, despite it's generally lower review scores.

  • Grid SystemGrid System Registered User
    edited June 2009
    I bought Rainbow's End the other day, but I haven't read it yet. Maybe I'll give it a shot once I finish Catch-22.

  • NoahnautNoahnaut Registered User
    edited June 2009
    Man, I haven't read Catch-22 since I was a Sophomore in High School, and probably too young to fully appreciate it.

  • Grid SystemGrid System Registered User
    edited June 2009
    This is my first time reading it. My high school English classes sucked.

  • DouglasDangerDouglasDanger Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    I bought Rainbow's End the other day, but I haven't read it yet. Maybe I'll give it a shot once I finish Catch-22.

    I need to finish reading Catch-22. First, I need to finish Sword of the Lictor.

    I play games on ps3 and ps4. My PSN is DouglasDanger.
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