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How is that even food?

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Posts

  • emnmnmeemnmnme Heard about this on conservative radio:Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Kagera wrote: »
    Most of the shit I liked as a kid is either no longer available because it was so horrible or obviously doesn't taste good anymore.

    It kinda saddens me because I see a box of Cookie Crisp and get an urge for the good ol' days.

    Half the food on this lost belongs on this thread but I do remember liking Keebler's Magic Middles.

    http://www.seriouseats.com/2008/04/old-fashioned-nostalgia-retro-discontinued-nostalgic-foods-we-want-back.html

    ...and Crystal Pepsi. It tasted fine so long as you never let is touch the tip of your tongue. :P

    easybossfight_zps4752c132.gif
  • SkutSkutSkutSkut Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Deep South food that isn't fried chicken

    Grilled chicken, ribs, steak and other things, like hotdogs and even shrimp sometimes, and burgers of course, we grill a lot of stuff.

    Collard greens.

    grits!

    Barbeque sandwiches, delicous minced pork with home made barbeque sauce.

    And of course peaches, oranges, cherries maybe, we get pomegranates too I need some planters to start growing mine.

  • DuffelDuffel Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Kagera wrote: »
    Most of the shit I liked as a kid is either no longer available because it was so horrible or obviously doesn't taste good anymore.

    It kinda saddens me because I see a box of Cookie Crisp and get an urge for the good ol' days.

    Yeah that shit is disgusting. I tried a bowl a couple of years ago to see if it aged as well as I remembered.

    Don't your taste buds supposedly change as you age?

    Also, the only thing that needs to be on thisiswhyyourefat are... famous amos cookies. I wonder how many heart attacks have been caused by Famous Amos alone.

  • GodfatherGodfather Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Anyone who thinks the south can't cook anything but deep fry needs to head on over to Texas for it's legendary barbecue. The king of all bbq is slow-cooked brisket:

    Brisket_0095diff.jpg

    Done right, it's pure lean beef done right that will knock you flat on your ass.

    Barbecue and tex-mex is the reason why I call this place home.

    0WBv0.png
  • PongePonge Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Back to the shrimp discussion, you're actually supposed to suck the shrimp juice out of the shrimps head after you remove it. I've never tried it but the people over here in China say it's the best part.

  • Page-Page- Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    So, I was browsing that site, and everything was going fine. I mean, most of the things in there I could never imagine someone else eating. And, really, if you're going to put the effort in to making deep fried hot dogs in hollowed out twinkies, then you could have easily made yourself something half-decent to eat instead.

    Then, I found it.

    Chocolate covered bacon.

    Nothing will ever surprise or disgust me in the food realm again.

    (Mostly) Competitive Gaming Blog Updated December 10th. "Second Chances" (Short Story)
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  • redxredx Bow Down! Before the power of Santa!Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    There's this little hole in the wall down in Naples, FL that does pigs in a blanket(sausages wrapped in pancakes) smothered in sausage gravy with a biscuit. It's freaking phenomenal. I normally get a side of bacon too.


    I'm from up north though, they have this thing called scrapple.
    Wikipedia wrote:
    270px-Plate_of_scrapple.jpg
    Scrapple is a savory mush of pork scraps and trimmings combined with cornmeal and flour, often buckwheat flour. The mush is formed into a loaf, and slices of the scrapple are then fried before serving. Scraps of meat left over from butchering, not used or sold elsewhere, were made into scrapple to avoid waste. Scrapple is best known as a regional American food of Delaware, Virginia, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Maryland.

    ...Scrapple is typically made of hog offal, such as the head, heart, liver, and other scraps, which are boiled with any bones attached (often the entire head), to make a broth. Once cooked, bones and fat are discarded, the meat is reserved, and (dry) cornmeal is boiled in the broth to make a mush. The meat, finely minced, is returned, and seasonings, typically sage, thyme, savory, and others are added. The mush is formed into loaves and allowed to cool thoroughly until set. The proportions and seasoning are very much a matter of the region and the cook's taste.

    Commercial scrapple often contains these traditional ingredients, with a distinctive flavor to each brand. A few manufacturers have introduced beef and turkey varieties and color the loaf to retain the traditional coloration derived from the original pork liver base.

    Vegetarian scrapple, made from soy protein or wheat gluten, is offered in some places. It is seasoned to be much sweeter than typical meat scrapple.

    mmmm... good.

    Bow Down, Bow Down
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  • KalTorakKalTorak Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Ugh, scrapple was the first thing I thought of when I saw this thread, but I couldn't remember the word for it for like 5 pages.

  • ruforufo Registered User
    edited May 2009
  • MalkorMalkor Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    I've had some of those Fat Sandwiches from grease trucks when visiting friends at Rutgers.

    I'd kill for a Fat Darrel pretty much any day of the week

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J2jibDjoLHw

    14271f3c-c765-4e74-92b1-49d7612675f2.jpg
  • DuffelDuffel Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Godfather wrote: »
    Anyone who thinks the south can't cook anything but deep fry needs to head on over to Texas for it's legendary barbecue. The king of all bbq is slow-cooked brisket:

    *delicious*

    Done right, it's pure lean beef done right that will knock you flat on your ass.

    Barbecue and tex-mex is the reason why I call this place home.
    See, I've never thought of Texas as "the South", since Texas has its own (very distinct) culture. But honestly, the South is such a vaguely defined term that it can mean damn near anywhere from Virginia to Key West. I always heard growing up the KY was "the South" and I assumed this was true... until I spent some time in Mississippi. Talk about some culture shock.

    I'm not really sure that geographical terms like "the South" or "New England" are really all that useful. In my own state you can see worlds of difference between a bourgeouis Lexingtonian, an isolated eastern Kentuckian, people in the western part of the state, who are more like your stereotypical midwesterner than anything else, and Louisvilleians, which is practically in the Rust Belt. Accents, attitudes, demeanor - it all varies widely, and that's just in one state. I'm sure all the others are the same way, although I couldn't say for sure because I've only lived in this state for an extended period of time.

  • wwtMaskwwtMask Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Man, all these people getting down on southern cuisine. If you can watch Paula Dean's show and think the food she's cooking is bad, I don't know what to say to you.

    Oh, and sweet potato fries are the best. A local French restaurant here in Tallahassee makes the best I've ever had.

    When he dies, I hope they write "Worst Affirmative Action Hire, EVER" on his grave. His corpse should be trolled.
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  • PodlyPodly good moleman to youRegistered User regular
    edited May 2009
    i need coffee

    follow my music twitter soundcloud tumblr
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  • GungHoGungHo Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    emnmnme wrote: »
    Anyone remember Fruit Roll Ups? Don't let the nostalgia cloud you're mind - those things are terrible. They're as sugary as candy but they have vitamin C in them so some parents are fooled into thinking they're food. If you try to chew them, they gum up your molars and they're so tough!

    You might as well sprinkle sugar over wax paper.
    We used to roll them into straws and use them to drink sodas. The cherry was really good with Coke or Dr. Pepper.
    emnmnme wrote: »
    ...and Crystal Pepsi. It tasted fine so long as you never let is touch the tip of your tongue. :P
    Right now, somebody's got the wrong idea.

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  • CervetusCervetus Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    rufo wrote: »
    Chicken fried bacon

    No words are required.

    What a waste of bacon.

    The libertarian response to anything is, "Sure, that works fine in practice, but it doesn't fly in theory."
  • ruforufo Registered User
    edited May 2009
    Cervetus wrote: »
    rufo wrote: »
    [vidurl=""]Chicken Fried Bacon[/vidurl]

    No words are required.

    What a waste of bacon.

    What I especially love about [vidurl=""]that video[/vidurl] is how the bacon is just your appetizer for a steak larger than the dinner plate it sits on, along with a gigantic side of onion rings.

    That, and the woman dumping on salt. Each shake of the sprinkler makes my heart hurt just a little bit more.

    EDIT: Just found the Yelp page for Sodolak's. Apparently it's worth the visit if you're nearby...

  • emnmnmeemnmnme Heard about this on conservative radio:Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Not necessarily a food but condiment abuse is gross. When a person drowns their waffles in syrup or buries their baked potato in bacon bits, I shed a tear.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VfEG15CLTqo

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mPpQ8DLCzJQ

    easybossfight_zps4752c132.gif
  • TachTach Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    redx wrote: »
    There's this little hole in the wall down in Naples, FL that does pigs in a blanket(sausages wrapped in pancakes) smothered in sausage gravy with a biscuit. It's freaking phenomenal. I normally get a side of bacon too.


    I'm from up north though, they have this thing called scrapple.
    Wikipedia wrote:
    270px-Plate_of_scrapple.jpg
    Scrapple is a savory mush of pork scraps and trimmings combined with cornmeal and flour, often buckwheat flour. The mush is formed into a loaf, and slices of the scrapple are then fried before serving. Scraps of meat left over from butchering, not used or sold elsewhere, were made into scrapple to avoid waste. Scrapple is best known as a regional American food of Delaware, Virginia, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Maryland.

    ...Scrapple is typically made of hog offal, such as the head, heart, liver, and other scraps, which are boiled with any bones attached (often the entire head), to make a broth. Once cooked, bones and fat are discarded, the meat is reserved, and (dry) cornmeal is boiled in the broth to make a mush. The meat, finely minced, is returned, and seasonings, typically sage, thyme, savory, and others are added. The mush is formed into loaves and allowed to cool thoroughly until set. The proportions and seasoning are very much a matter of the region and the cook's taste.

    Commercial scrapple often contains these traditional ingredients, with a distinctive flavor to each brand. A few manufacturers have introduced beef and turkey varieties and color the loaf to retain the traditional coloration derived from the original pork liver base.

    Vegetarian scrapple, made from soy protein or wheat gluten, is offered in some places. It is seasoned to be much sweeter than typical meat scrapple.

    mmmm... good.
    My grandfather is from back east, and introduced me to scrapple. To this day, I crave it like nothing else. It's not only goddamn tasty, it's a comfort food because it reminds me of younger days visiting my grandparents.

    Dammit. I hate this thread. :(

    BNsig.jpg
  • BulovaBulova Registered User
    edited May 2009
    Liver mush. You slice it, fry it, put it on white bread with mustard. Good eatin'. I don't want to know what's in it.
    Spoiler:

  • BloodySlothBloodySloth Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    That looks like someone set a bath mat on fire.

  • japanjapan Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    wwtMask wrote: »
    If you can watch Paula Dean's show and think the food she's cooking is bad, I don't know what to say to you.

    Isn't she the one infamously responsible for "deep fried butter"?

    EDIT: Yes. Yes she is.

  • enc0reenc0re Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    emnmnme wrote: »

    I am a Butterton. I cheer, every time that commercial comes up on Hulu.

    Today's Butterton tip: I panfry my (thick-sliced slab) bacon in butter. Delicious.

  • PataPata Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Cervetus wrote: »
    It's kind of weird that I think blood pudding sounds horrible, yet I regularly consume my own blood whenever I'm cut and think it tastes good. Maybe it's one of those things where I can only handle it if it's mine.

    You're a vampire.

    Spoiler:
  • oldmankenoldmanken Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    enc0re wrote: »
    emnmnme wrote: »

    I am a Butterton. I cheer, every time that commercial comes up on Hulu.

    Today's Butterton tip: I panfry my (thick-sliced slab) bacon in butter. Delicious.

    May I suggest a visit to your doctor in order to get your heart checked?

  • wwtMaskwwtMask Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    japan wrote: »
    wwtMask wrote: »
    If you can watch Paula Dean's show and think the food she's cooking is bad, I don't know what to say to you.

    Isn't she the one infamously responsible for "deep fried butter"?

    EDIT: Yes. Yes she is.

    Those sound delicious. Then again, I did watch Homer eat a stick of butter in a waffle while wondering to myself why I didn't think of that.

    When he dies, I hope they write "Worst Affirmative Action Hire, EVER" on his grave. His corpse should be trolled.
    Twitter - @liberaltruths | Google+ - http://gplus.to/wwtMask | Occupy Tallahassee
  • ScalfinScalfin __BANNED USERS regular
    edited May 2009
    I love that southerners here are claiming that grilling is a regional practice, while there is no place in the world where you won't find grilled food.

    It's almost as hilarious as the Texan who claimed that you can't get real Buffalo wings in the north. I proceeded to ask him if he knew where Buffalo is.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    The rest of you, I fucking hate you for the fact that I now have a blue dot on this god awful thread.
  • enc0reenc0re Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    oldmanken wrote: »
    enc0re wrote: »
    emnmnme wrote: »

    I am a Butterton. I cheer, every time that commercial comes up on Hulu.

    Today's Butterton tip: I panfry my (thick-sliced slab) bacon in butter. Delicious.

    May I suggest a visit to your doctor in order to get your heart checked?

    I get a check up once a year. My blood pressure, sugar, cholesterol, and fat are great. In fact, this year she remarked it crept her out that none of my values had changed a single digit over the past three years.

    Trust me, if those numbers turned bad, I'd have to make some radical changes to my diet. I eat Sauce Hollandaise (over steamed vegetables) literally almost every night. And steak. Tasty, corn-fed rib-eye.

    Butterton tip: Just after you flip your steak, put a slice of butter on it. It soaks right in and makes the steak that much better.

  • ruforufo Registered User
    edited May 2009
    enc0re wrote: »
    I eat Sauce Hollandaise (over steamed vegetables) literally almost every night. And steak. Tasty, corn-fed rib-eye.

    Butterton tip: Just after you flip your steak, put a slice of butter on it. It soaks right in and makes the steak that much better.

    I hear that's one of the secrets of high-end steak places.

    Also: I hate you.

  • BarrakkethBarrakketh Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Scalfin wrote: »
    I love that southerners here are claiming that grilling is a regional practice, while there is no place in the world where you won't find grilled food.

    I don't think that's what we're getting at (easy northern example: Wisconsin, especially with bratwurst). It probably has more to do with northeastern states and what we generally consider to be a large percentage of the people in those states living in densely populated urban areas. I can't really picture a notable amount of people living in apartments who a) own a grill, b) have a place to use it, and c) grill regularly (for me "regularly" means at least once a week). Smokers are a different story so I'm not counting those right now ;-)

  • ScalfinScalfin __BANNED USERS regular
    edited May 2009
    Barrakketh wrote: »
    Scalfin wrote: »
    I love that southerners here are claiming that grilling is a regional practice, while there is no place in the world where you won't find grilled food.

    I don't think that's what we're getting at (easy northern example: Wisconsin, especially with bratwurst). It probably has more to do with northeastern states and what we generally consider to be a large percentage of the people in those states living in densely populated urban areas. I can't really picture a notable amount of people living in apartments who a) own a grill, b) have a place to use it, and c) grill regularly (for me "regularly" means at least once a week). Smokers are a different story so I'm not counting those right now ;-)

    Restaurants almost always have grilled items, and I'm pretty sure it's common for buildings to have a shared grill in a shared courtyard.

    I'm also surprised that cole slaw is considered southern. Up here, it's always served with fried seafood, sometimes with other seafood, and with pretty much everything on the cape.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    The rest of you, I fucking hate you for the fact that I now have a blue dot on this god awful thread.
  • BarrakkethBarrakketh Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Scalfin wrote: »
    Barrakketh wrote: »
    Scalfin wrote: »
    I love that southerners here are claiming that grilling is a regional practice, while there is no place in the world where you won't find grilled food.

    I don't think that's what we're getting at (easy northern example: Wisconsin, especially with bratwurst). It probably has more to do with northeastern states and what we generally consider to be a large percentage of the people in those states living in densely populated urban areas. I can't really picture a notable amount of people living in apartments who a) own a grill, b) have a place to use it, and c) grill regularly (for me "regularly" means at least once a week). Smokers are a different story so I'm not counting those right now ;-)

    Restaurants almost always have grilled items, and I'm pretty sure it's common for buildings to have a shared grill in a shared courtyard.

    What restaurants usually call grilled isn't what I call grilled, but I'll admit that I'm probably in the minority on this. To me if it doesn't impart a nice smoky flavor on the food it isn't grilled no matter how it was prepared (smoking is separate because that's for food that gets slow cooked, with the exception of cold smoking). Even some cheap gas grills can produce food that I wouldn't consider grilled (charcoal does it better, anyway). "Grill marks" mean nothing because you can put those on the food with a stovetop, usually with a ridged cast iron griddle. Some restaurants even use a brand. In the end it's all about the flavor imparted on the food, and few of the restaurants I've ever been to provide what I consider grilled meat.
    I'm also surprised that cole slaw is considered southern. Up here, it's always served with fried seafood, sometimes with other seafood, and with pretty much everything on the cape.

    Stereotypically southern, but I personally think the shit is disgusting :lol:

  • DuffelDuffel Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Most southern food is disgusting if you didn't grow up around it, or even if you did for some of us. I don't even like the smell of coleslaw, I absolutely hate sweet tea, grits, collard greens and all that happy horseshit - no thank you.

  • OmeksOmeks Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    japan wrote: »
    wwtMask wrote: »
    If you can watch Paula Dean's show and think the food she's cooking is bad, I don't know what to say to you.

    Isn't she the one infamously responsible for "deep fried butter"?

    EDIT:

    Apparently she did this...thing as well.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zv8yEMRDe_w

    I thought it was a joke until they started eating it.

    Also, she makes me die a little bit each time she suggestively talks about "rubbing your meat" on her party show.

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  • japanjapan Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    There are no words.

    I'm bearing this in mind for the next person to give me shit about deep-fried Mars bars. That's practically health food next to that monstrosity.

  • postinonthenetspostinonthenets Registered User
    edited May 2009
    Omeks wrote: »
    japan wrote: »
    wwtMask wrote: »
    If you can watch Paula Dean's show and think the food she's cooking is bad, I don't know what to say to you.

    Isn't she the one infamously responsible for "deep fried butter"?

    EDIT:

    Apparently she did this...thing as well.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zv8yEMRDe_w

    I thought it was a joke until they started eating it.

    Also, she makes me die a little bit each time she suggestively talks about "rubbing your meat" on her party show.

    I'm going to make that this weekend, no joke.

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  • ScalfinScalfin __BANNED USERS regular
    edited May 2009
    Duffel wrote: »
    Most southern food is disgusting if you didn't grow up around it, or even if you did for some of us. I don't even like the smell of coleslaw, I absolutely hate sweet tea, grits, collard greens and all that happy horseshit - no thank you.

    I find cole slaw is much better with just a bit of ketchup added.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    The rest of you, I fucking hate you for the fact that I now have a blue dot on this god awful thread.
  • enc0reenc0re Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Omeks wrote: »

    I don't get it. Is that supposed to be an informational cooking show (like Good Eats) or a do-stupid-shit-on-TV show (like Jackass)?

  • SkutSkutSkutSkut Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Barrakketh wrote: »
    Scalfin wrote: »
    Barrakketh wrote: »
    Scalfin wrote: »
    I love that southerners here are claiming that grilling is a regional practice, while there is no place in the world where you won't find grilled food.

    I don't think that's what we're getting at (easy northern example: Wisconsin, especially with bratwurst). It probably has more to do with northeastern states and what we generally consider to be a large percentage of the people in those states living in densely populated urban areas. I can't really picture a notable amount of people living in apartments who a) own a grill, b) have a place to use it, and c) grill regularly (for me "regularly" means at least once a week). Smokers are a different story so I'm not counting those right now ;-)

    Restaurants almost always have grilled items, and I'm pretty sure it's common for buildings to have a shared grill in a shared courtyard.

    What restaurants usually call grilled isn't what I call grilled, but I'll admit that I'm probably in the minority on this. To me if it doesn't impart a nice smoky flavor on the food it isn't grilled no matter how it was prepared (smoking is separate because that's for food that gets slow cooked, with the exception of cold smoking). Even some cheap gas grills can produce food that I wouldn't consider grilled (charcoal does it better, anyway). "Grill marks" mean nothing because you can put those on the food with a stovetop, usually with a ridged cast iron griddle. Some restaurants even use a brand. In the end it's all about the flavor imparted on the food, and few of the restaurants I've ever been to provide what I consider grilled meat.

    No, home grilled is way better than restaurant "grilled"

  • oldmankenoldmanken Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    That donut thing was a god damned travesty! What the hell was she thinking!?!

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