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Home Ethernet Networking .... HELP!

BoGsBoGs Registered User
edited June 2009 in Help / Advice Forum
So here is the situation. I am building my first home and with me being a huge computer nerd I had asked the builder to pre-wire my house with network cables. I paid a tad extra but its all in there and looking blue :). I am going to be moving in next month and would like to have everything setup within the first week for my computer addiction.

The problem is the network cables are only rough-ins. The cables are bunched up and in the socket with a blank faceplate. I will be going to pick up the female rj-45 and a slotted faceplate, as well as something for the basement.

Anyone have a website where it would show how to setup (connect) the individual smaller cable colors to the female connector or any suggestions on how to set this up efficiently as the cables are bunched in the wall in a socket on the main and upper floor and just hanging in the basement. I have searched and I am not really sure, I might have to call someone (don't know who) to do it for me, if I am not confident enough.

Thanks

BoGs on
"It is the mark of an educated man to teach without a thought." - Aristotle

"Thoughts are a persons imagination going rampid…" - ME :)

Posts

  • JoeUserJoeUser Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    Structured Wiring How-To

    It goes through the whole process of wiring your house, but CAT5 stripping and terminating is what you want, I think.

    PSN: JoeUser80 Steam
  • matt has a problemmatt has a problem Six pack on a dick Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    When you pick up a crimping tool, the package will have a card in it with a diagram on how to align the wires in the ends. If not, here's a guide - http://www.practicallynetworked.com/howto/040506diy_cables.htm

    h1DI1.jpg
    All my fuckin life I lived a normal fuckin life
  • ErandusErandus Registered User
    edited June 2009
    You may need a Punch Tool to terminate the cables on the wiring terminals on the jack. There are self-terminating inserts these days that can take care of that, make sure you know which you are buying.

    There are some instructions here on how to make the terminations. For standard Cat5e pinning, you want to use the wiring diagram on the right side of this diagram for MALE cable ends. The female ends on the faceplate have color code guides on the sides of them.

    White-Orange, Orange, White-Green, Blue, White-Blue, Green, White-Brown, Brown. Write that on something and carry it on your person when you're doing this.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • BoGsBoGs Registered User
    edited June 2009
    OK...... so I should follow the B standard? I already have network cables that I can use that I bought at a computer store how do I know what standard they are?

    "It is the mark of an educated man to teach without a thought." - Aristotle

    "Thoughts are a persons imagination going rampid…" - ME :)
  • RuckusRuckus Registered User regular
    edited June 2009
    BoGs wrote: »
    OK...... so I should follow the B standard? I already have network cables that I can use that I bought at a computer store how do I know what standard they are?

    It doesn't matter which standard you use as long as you wire both ends of that cable to the same standard. This creates a "Straight" cable.

    Wiring one end to the 'A' standard and the other to the 'B' standard creates a "Crossover" cable.

    Actually, with today's autosensing switches, it probably wouldn't matter anyway, as long as each end was wired correctly to either standard.

    I'd still recommend wiring them as "Straight" cables though.

    Raneados wrote: »
    so what SPECIFICALLY is the problem with my hole?
  • ErandusErandus Registered User
    edited June 2009
    If you bought cables from a computer store that are already terminated with male ends, they are almost certainly wired to the 'B' standard. That is the most common pinning by far for cat5. You can verify easily enough by just looking at the wires inside the male end. They will match one of these two standards.

    What Ruckus says about switches auto sensing is likely correct, but don't count on it.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
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