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Let's bitch about quirks in videogame logic!

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Posts

  • emnmnmeemnmnme Heard about this on conservative radio:Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    Sometimes devs can turn a limitation into the whole story. In the cRPG Gothic, you're a convict sentenced to hard labor in the mines. The mines have a magic dome barrier over them so anyone who gets near the dome is zapped to death. Now this is obviously done to make sure the player doesn't run fifty miles in one direction and to keep Gothic's world manageable and I'm betting it also cuts down on data the game needs to load.

    Meh. If Lex Luthor can have his Kryptonite Fog, Gothic can have a gaming's biggest invisible wall.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rRjNsWFetRo&feature=related

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  • BakerIsBoredBakerIsBored Registered User
    edited August 2009
    Buttcleft wrote: »
    Buttcleft wrote: »
    The thing I hate the MOST in any video game, to the point where I will turn the game off and not ever want to play it again, is nonsensical worlds.

    Zelda is the biggest offender. Welcome to the vast and prosperous kingdom of Hyrule! Hey buddy, you know your "kingdom" is a town, a horse ranch, a lake, a couple of trees, and a sandbox right? There's maybe 50 people living here. 50 people does not a kingdom make. Where are the farms, where do you get your food, what do you trade and barter with, and why are there no roads leading out of this shithole despite the fact you specifically mention the fact there are other population centers around.

    This, seriously, is why I've never finished a Zelda game. The world feels constructed and artificial, existing only for the purpose of housing more puzzles than citizens. Granted that earlier on this was due to technological constraints, but there was no need for Twilight Princess to be exactly the bloody same.

    I've never minded this. Simply because people would bitch that they can't run a game because there's 50,000 completely pointless NPCs making the game run at negative fifty frames per second.

    I've always taken the view that each on screen character represented X number of NPCs, depending on teh size of the village that X could be anywhere from 5 to 50 depending on various assumptions on the supposed population density and infrastructure available.

    Perhaps I overthink things, as well.

    That's, er, an interesting way of thinking about it.

    The thing is, that they wouldn't even need 50,000 NPCs either. Just make it clear to the player that this is only a small slice of the kingdom. Maybe add a token farm here and there. Just make it believable.

    I also assume that there is vast farm area and such as well, but not implemented because there is no point in the story for it to be there, and implementing pointless areas are a performance and monetary waste.

    Yeah, I'll give you that one. I never said it was a sensible request, just one that really irks me. And there are games that do it well too. World of Warcraft shows farms and ranches along with cities and wilderness. Or even smaller games like Assassin's Creed. It's possible, to make your game world believable and relevant, just tricky.

    It irks you that the world is not realistic? yet, you are playing a Zelda game, with fairies, undead, magic, etc. Maybe they don't need lots of farms, because "Farmy" magically creates all their food for them. Also, depending on the time era games are released, hardware can only do so much. If you’re talking about the world of Zelda from OOT, I think given its release on the N64, they did a rather good job.

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  • GunstarGunstar Registered User
    edited August 2009
    I guess it's supposed to be some other alternative world but in the Phoenix Wright games the law is so out of whack. It seems like everyone is guilty until proven innocent just because they were in the same general area when the murder took place. It's almost like talking about it in court just digs them a deeper hole until by some miracle I dig them out

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  • emnmnmeemnmnme Heard about this on conservative radio:Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    My character has 4 million gold in Diablo 2. 4 million gold coins. For a single country, there's not enough gold in the ground to produce 4 million gold coins.

    But I still can't afford to buy another lockbox in which to stash my loot.

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  • GunstarGunstar Registered User
    edited August 2009
    emnmnme wrote: »
    My character has 4 million gold in Diablo 2. 4 million gold coins. For a single country, there's not enough gold in the ground to produce 4 million gold coins.

    But I still can't afford to buy another lockbox in which to stash my loot.

    This leads me to my other one. I have an unholy amount of yen a fair bit into Persona 3? Why do I only use it for fusing Personas and going to the movies/buying sodas. I could totally be a mega pimp at Gekkoukan High

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  • BlackDragon480BlackDragon480 Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    emnmnme wrote: »
    My character has 4 million gold in Diablo 2. 4 million gold coins. For a single country, there's not enough gold in the ground to produce 4 million gold coins.

    I think that after the first few hundred coins monsters actually start dropping negotiable bearer bonds, instead of solid species.

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  • GilderGilder Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    Gunstar wrote: »
    I guess it's supposed to be some other alternative world but in the Phoenix Wright games the law is so out of whack. It seems like everyone is guilty until proven innocent just because they were in the same general area when the murder took place. It's almost like talking about it in court just digs them a deeper hole until by some miracle I dig them out

    Well they kind of try to explain their way out of that by doing the whole 3 day thing. It's easier to move things along if you just assume the person is guilty as opposed to innocent. As the games show it can take all 3 days to prove innocence, but only 5 minutes for guilt. That keeps things moving quite nicely.

    Edit: Also I think it's supposed to be a statement on attorneys and prosecutors in japan. I think they have more respect for prosecutors, so they would side with guilty as opposed to innocent.

  • lowlylowlycooklowlylowlycook Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    emnmnme wrote: »
    My character has 4 million gold in Diablo 2. 4 million gold coins. For a single country, there's not enough gold in the ground to produce 4 million gold coins.

    But I still can't afford to buy another lockbox in which to stash my loot.

    Sure a lockbox might be cheap, but a lockbox which can never, ever be stolen from is going to cost you :)

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  • GunstarGunstar Registered User
    edited August 2009
    Gilder wrote: »
    Gunstar wrote: »
    I guess it's supposed to be some other alternative world but in the Phoenix Wright games the law is so out of whack. It seems like everyone is guilty until proven innocent just because they were in the same general area when the murder took place. It's almost like talking about it in court just digs them a deeper hole until by some miracle I dig them out

    Well they kind of try to explain their way out of that by doing the whole 3 day thing. It's easier to move things along if you just assume the person is guilty as opposed to innocent. As the games show it can take all 3 days to prove innocence, but only 5 minutes for guilt. That keeps things moving quite nicely.

    Edit: Also I think it's supposed to be a statement on attorneys and prosecutors in japan. I think they have more respect for prosecutors, so they would side with guilty as opposed to innocent.

    It just makes me wonder what the fuck is going down when I (Phoenix) am not there to be like "Are you fucking serious?" Are the streets full of convicts and the jails full of innocent people?!

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  • GilderGilder Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    Gunstar wrote: »
    Gilder wrote: »
    Gunstar wrote: »
    I guess it's supposed to be some other alternative world but in the Phoenix Wright games the law is so out of whack. It seems like everyone is guilty until proven innocent just because they were in the same general area when the murder took place. It's almost like talking about it in court just digs them a deeper hole until by some miracle I dig them out

    Well they kind of try to explain their way out of that by doing the whole 3 day thing. It's easier to move things along if you just assume the person is guilty as opposed to innocent. As the games show it can take all 3 days to prove innocence, but only 5 minutes for guilt. That keeps things moving quite nicely.

    Edit: Also I think it's supposed to be a statement on attorneys and prosecutors in japan. I think they have more respect for prosecutors, so they would side with guilty as opposed to innocent.

    It just makes me wonder what the fuck is going down when I (Phoenix) am not there to be like "Are you fucking serious?" Are the streets full of convicts and the jails full of innocent people?!

    I think that that is exactly the case. Edgeworth was undefeated before Phoenix, wasn't he? That's a lot of guilty verdicts.

  • emnmnmeemnmnme Heard about this on conservative radio:Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    Gunstar wrote: »
    Gilder wrote: »
    Gunstar wrote: »
    I guess it's supposed to be some other alternative world but in the Phoenix Wright games the law is so out of whack. It seems like everyone is guilty until proven innocent just because they were in the same general area when the murder took place. It's almost like talking about it in court just digs them a deeper hole until by some miracle I dig them out

    Well they kind of try to explain their way out of that by doing the whole 3 day thing. It's easier to move things along if you just assume the person is guilty as opposed to innocent. As the games show it can take all 3 days to prove innocence, but only 5 minutes for guilt. That keeps things moving quite nicely.

    Edit: Also I think it's supposed to be a statement on attorneys and prosecutors in japan. I think they have more respect for prosecutors, so they would side with guilty as opposed to innocent.

    It just makes me wonder what the fuck is going down when I (Phoenix) am not there to be like "Are you fucking serious?" Are the streets full of convicts and the jails full of innocent people?!

    That's the three day court thing. They have mini trials and if they're found guilty in the mini trial, they get a real full blown trial at a later date ... and because you lost the mini trial, you're too incompetent to represent your client a second time. :P

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  • Steel AngelSteel Angel Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    Gunstar wrote: »
    I guess it's supposed to be some other alternative world but in the Phoenix Wright games the law is so out of whack. It seems like everyone is guilty until proven innocent just because they were in the same general area when the murder took place. It's almost like talking about it in court just digs them a deeper hole until by some miracle I dig them out

    As has been explained before in the threads about the game, Phoenix Wright games are actually a satire of the Japanese court system. Guilty unless proven innocent, trial with no jury, and the dirty tricks played by the prosecution? That's how it actually works in Japan!

    We may view it as just a bizarre game world in the states what with a criminal legal system that at least makes some sense, but Capcom is actually pointing out how messed up the legal system in Japan is. The big deal made about trial by jury in Apollo Justice? That's because Japan is only now experimenting with trial by jury and Capcom is trying to point out to the Japanese populace that it isn't a crazy idea to people that, when polled, were afraid of it.

    Big Dookie wrote: »
    I found that tilting it doesn't work very well, and once I started jerking it, I got much better results.

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  • Steel AngelSteel Angel Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    Gunstar wrote: »
    Gilder wrote: »
    Gunstar wrote: »
    I guess it's supposed to be some other alternative world but in the Phoenix Wright games the law is so out of whack. It seems like everyone is guilty until proven innocent just because they were in the same general area when the murder took place. It's almost like talking about it in court just digs them a deeper hole until by some miracle I dig them out

    Well they kind of try to explain their way out of that by doing the whole 3 day thing. It's easier to move things along if you just assume the person is guilty as opposed to innocent. As the games show it can take all 3 days to prove innocence, but only 5 minutes for guilt. That keeps things moving quite nicely.

    Edit: Also I think it's supposed to be a statement on attorneys and prosecutors in japan. I think they have more respect for prosecutors, so they would side with guilty as opposed to innocent.

    It just makes me wonder what the fuck is going down when I (Phoenix) am not there to be like "Are you fucking serious?" Are the streets full of convicts and the jails full of innocent people?!

    I wouldn't say full of innocent people. But you know how Gumshoe is depicted as a lovable oaf? By accounts of people who have been arrested in Japan, in reality he'd be beating the suspect trying to get a confession before an actual trial "proved" their guilt.

    Big Dookie wrote: »
    I found that tilting it doesn't work very well, and once I started jerking it, I got much better results.

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  • emnmnmeemnmnme Heard about this on conservative radio:Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    I once read in an old EGM preview of Metal Gear Solid 2 that they intended for Snake to grow a five o' clock shadow while he was out on his mission. Now that we have super duper ultra-powerful consoles and graphics cards, why doesn't Link start sprouting whiskers after 20 days in Hyrule Field? :P

    easybossfight_zps4752c132.gif
  • BlackDragon480BlackDragon480 Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    emnmnme wrote: »
    I once read in an old EGM preview of Metal Gear Solid 2 that they intended for Snake to grow a five o' clock shadow while he was out on his mission. Now that we have super duper ultra-powerful consoles and graphics cards, why doesn't Link start sprouting whiskers after 20 days in Hyrule Field? :P

    His balls haven't dropped yet?

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  • MonstyMonsty Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    I hate death throes. I mean, if they just got one more punch off on me as they die, fine. But no, enemies can perform complex rituals upon being murdered.

    Anyone remember Magi Master from FF6? Yeah, wasn't that quite a nice FUCK YOU the first time you beat him and he whips out Ultima as he falls. I get to climb the tower of agony again!

    (and yes, now that I'm s-m-r-t I use the Moogle Charm and Life 3 to make everything painfully easy)

  • jothkijothki Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    Dunxco wrote: »
    If some malevolent force was a problem 10, 100, 1000 etc. years ago, you can bet your bottom dollar that the previous heroes/ancient mystical race/gods just sealed it away instead of actually sorting out the problem. Then the malevolent force will break free during the current hero(es) time period to cause havoc, and it's up to the present hero(es) to rectify past mistakes and obliterating the evil, rather than sealing it back away again. Thus, nobody seems to learn from the mistakes of their elders. Ever. They just leave it up to the kids to handle it.

    It just seems like that because you only ever hear about the ancient evils that were sealed away and are about to break out. Plenty of evil could have been defeated and destroyed in the past, but you never hear about it because no one needs to care about it any more.

  • elliotw2elliotw2 Registered User
    edited August 2009
    Darth_Mogs wrote: »
    Oh, cool. Nobody mentioned Cutscene Deaths yet.

    So...

    Cutscene Deaths.

    "Hey, I'm super awesome, and if I die in battle, just use a (insert recovery item here) on me and I'll be A-Okay! Wait, what, that's the main bad guy?

    Goddamnit. *Death warble*"

    See: Mass Effect. In one mission, Shepard's shot by a jumpy person with a handgun, shield absorbs it, we go on, on another mission,
    Spoiler:

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  • Octopus MelodyOctopus Melody Registered User
    edited August 2009
    One of the reasons I loved the game Flower, Sun and Rain on the DS is that it pokes fun at all this weird video game logic. A big part of the game is commenting on and examining all the weird stuff that happens in video games.

    For example, characters comment about how talking to them turns on "flags" so you can accomplish the next task even if its arbitrary. More and more ridiculous things keep appearing to block your path, at one point the sign on top of a hotel goes flying off and lands directly in front of your character so he can't go further. There's also the fact about how weird it is that you can always find what you need to get to the next area or solve the puzzle, which in the game is represented by a guide book you get at the beginning that has the solution to every puzzle you come across in it.

    Game is full of stuff like that.

  • DunxcoDunxco Should get a suit Never skips breakfastRegistered User regular
    edited August 2009
    jothki wrote: »
    Dunxco wrote: »
    If some malevolent force was a problem 10, 100, 1000 etc. years ago, you can bet your bottom dollar that the previous heroes/ancient mystical race/gods just sealed it away instead of actually sorting out the problem. Then the malevolent force will break free during the current hero(es) time period to cause havoc, and it's up to the present hero(es) to rectify past mistakes and obliterating the evil, rather than sealing it back away again. Thus, nobody seems to learn from the mistakes of their elders. Ever. They just leave it up to the kids to handle it.

    It just seems like that because you only ever hear about the ancient evils that were sealed away and are about to break out. Plenty of evil could have been defeated and destroyed in the past, but you never hear about it because no one needs to care about it any more.

    That just creates more questions than answers. If there were hypothetically more evils that were destroyed in the past, so it's a moot point discussing them, then why only seal this evil away? Maybe because the evil was more powerful than the other hypothetical evils, and they couldn't destroy it, only seal it. Then why is the majority of the best equipment in fantasy games ancient weapons imbued with magical properties?

    Take Chrono Trigger for example - some of the best equipment to defeat Lavos, a threat in 1999 A.D., is gathered from time periods such as 65,000,000 B.C., 600 A.D. and 1000 A.D.

    All it does is create an inconsistent plot hole wherein the tools to defeat the big bad threat were around at the time when the menace originally reared its head, but the big bad was just locked away instead until a bunch of plucky upstarts get their hands on said weapons and destroy the baddie once and for all, despite the fact there was probably a group willing and capable enough to take down the bad guy when it first showed up.

    ... Unless the current heroes are fated or some stupid shit...

  • ButtcleftButtcleft Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    Dunxco wrote: »
    jothki wrote: »
    Dunxco wrote: »
    If some malevolent force was a problem 10, 100, 1000 etc. years ago, you can bet your bottom dollar that the previous heroes/ancient mystical race/gods just sealed it away instead of actually sorting out the problem. Then the malevolent force will break free during the current hero(es) time period to cause havoc, and it's up to the present hero(es) to rectify past mistakes and obliterating the evil, rather than sealing it back away again. Thus, nobody seems to learn from the mistakes of their elders. Ever. They just leave it up to the kids to handle it.

    It just seems like that because you only ever hear about the ancient evils that were sealed away and are about to break out. Plenty of evil could have been defeated and destroyed in the past, but you never hear about it because no one needs to care about it any more.

    That just creates more questions than answers. If there were hypothetically more evils that were destroyed in the past, so it's a moot point discussing them, then why only seal this evil away? Maybe because the evil was more powerful than the other hypothetical evils, and they couldn't destroy it, only seal it. Then why is the majority of the best equipment in fantasy games ancient weapons imbued with magical properties?

    Take Chrono Trigger for example - some of the best equipment to defeat Lavos, a threat in 1999 A.D., is gathered from time periods such as 65,000,000 B.C., 600 A.D. and 1000 A.D.

    All it does is create an inconsistent plot hole wherein the tools to defeat the big bad threat were around at the time when the menace originally reared its head, but the big bad was just locked away instead until a bunch of plucky upstarts get their hands on said weapons and destroy the baddie once and for all, despite the fact there was probably a group willing and capable enough to take down the bad guy when it first showed up.

    ... Unless the current heroes are fated or some stupid shit...

    What if the magic on the items distills with time and becomes more powerful?

    that's it, I'm shutting this entire forum down, everyone thank buttcleft
  • DarksierDarksier Registered User
    edited August 2009
    I thought that was because no one knew what Lavos was. And the only ones who did know tried to tap it for power and subsequently got wrecked.

  • DunxcoDunxco Should get a suit Never skips breakfastRegistered User regular
    edited August 2009
    Buttcleft wrote: »
    What if the magic on the items distills with time and becomes more powerful?

    Aha, then we've stumped upon other case of bizarro video game logic - "Gets Better With Age". It doesn't make any sense for a magic item to become more powerful the older it gets, unless specifically stated in the games narrative. Equally as powerful over, say, 500 years? Yes, perfectly feasible if magic is independant of time, which in most games it generally is. Less powerful after 500 years? It can work (fading enchants, dissipation of magic etc). Theoretically, the item should get worse with age, rather than stronger.
    Darksier wrote: »
    I thought that was because no one knew what Lavos was. And the only ones who did know tried to tap it for power and subsequently got wrecked.

    Well, yeah it was - the Chrono Trigger analogy sort of ended after that little nugget, and the last paragraph was more general hand-waving at the absurdity of these situations in other games. Should've probably put that across a bit better. :P

  • AxenAxen My avatar is Excalibur. Yes, the sword.Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    I've been playing a lot of Fallout 3 lately and I was discussing a few quirks with a buddy earlier. One of my favorites is this.

    You got people living in these blown out buildings right? Some people, like the Brotherhood of Steel, have been living in them for years. So what gets me is that these people couldn't spend a weekend or hell even an afternoon cleaning the place up? Trash is everywhere and some people still have crusty skeletons laying around! A post-apocalyptic nightmare wasteland is no excuse for a messy home.

  • RakaiRakai Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    There's also the issue that you don't get the power to fight Lavos until you visit the end of time(where you learn magic), so unless you could travel through time, you couldn't stop Lavos.

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  • ShukaoShukao Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    Aha, then we've stumped upon other case of bizarro video game logic - "Gets Better With Age". It doesn't make any sense for a magic item to become more powerful the older it gets, unless specifically stated in the games narrative. Equally as powerful over, say, 500 years? Yes, perfectly feasible if magic is independant of time, which in most games it generally is. Less powerful after 500 years? It can work (fading enchants, dissipation of magic etc). Theoretically, the item should get worse with age, rather than stronger.

    What!? I thought magical items were like whiskey. Or rum. Or maybe they just leech magicness from their surroundings.

  • MgsleeMgslee Registered User
    edited August 2009
    Dunxco wrote: »
    Theoretically, the item should get worse with age, rather than stronger.

    lol, thats just as bad as the games themselves...
    Magical items can create fireballs from nothing... If anything they're constantly getting / storing energy from the surrounding environment. Which would then make them more powerful over time. Yup, logic 101 right here

    Video game Laser weapons taught me that, stop firing for a bit and the weapon has full charge again.
    Oh yeah, why the hell are laser blasts, slower then bullets? Apparently the speed of light is really slow.

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  • MetroidZoidMetroidZoid Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    So my vote goes to Animal Crossing as king of hammerspace. No one juggles wardrobes, televisions, and a closet-full of clothes like you can in that game!

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  • MetalbourneMetalbourne Tube's Favorite Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    My all-time favorite video game thing is rpg barriers. small fences, cats, and even differently colored floor tiles will stop an rpg hero dead in his tracks. Why can't you get to that chest? There's a cat in front of it? Yeah, I know you have a sword, but trying to use it only leads to a text window with the word "meow" in it. So then you wait till the summer solstice, walk through a maze backward and in women's lingerie, spin around three times and throw your most powerful weapon into the lake and you get... a trumpet.

    Wondering what this could possibly do, you march all the way back to that chest with a cat in front and use the trumpet, which inspires the cat to slowly stand up and walk away. And after all that work, enjoy your herb, sucker!

  • ScooterScooter Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    Axen wrote: »
    I've been playing a lot of Fallout 3 lately and I was discussing a few quirks with a buddy earlier. One of my favorites is this.

    You got people living in these blown out buildings right? Some people, like the Brotherhood of Steel, have been living in them for years. So what gets me is that these people couldn't spend a weekend or hell even an afternoon cleaning the place up? Trash is everywhere and some people still have crusty skeletons laying around! A post-apocalyptic nightmare wasteland is no excuse for a messy home.

    The Fallout 3 world just does not work with a 200-years-post-war timeframe in any realistic sense at all. Think about it, in the 200 years from 1776 to 1976, the USA went from a strip of what, 15 million people on the edge between forest and ocean, most of whom weren't much better off than those in Fallout (no education, no decent medical care, no automated transportation or power, etc). To a nation of hundreds of millions who had landed a man on the moon. Fallout 3 is what it would look like maybe 5 years after the war, not 2 centuries.

    And that's just referring to how much humanity had recovered infrastructure wise, it almost makes me bang my head to try and believe that, not only are snack foods still edible after 200 years, but that until you came along nobody in 2 centuries had thought of raiding any of the stores for food (and in the meanwhile, you can clear out the entire Wasteland of supplies in about 3-4 months).

    I just have to tell myself that I'm playing in the idea of a post-apoc world, not an actual portrayal of one.

  • Burden of ProofBurden of Proof You three boys picked a beautiful hill to die on. Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    The thing I hate the MOST in any video game, to the point where I will turn the game off and not ever want to play it again, is nonsensical worlds.

    Zelda is the biggest offender. Welcome to the vast and prosperous kingdom of Hyrule! Hey buddy, you know your "kingdom" is a town, a horse ranch, a lake, a couple of trees, and a sandbox right? There's maybe 50 people living here. 50 people does not a kingdom make. Where are the farms, where do you get your food, what do you trade and barter with, and why are there no roads leading out of this shithole despite the fact you specifically mention the fact there are other population centers around.

    This, seriously, is why I've never finished a Zelda game. The world feels constructed and artificial, existing only for the purpose of housing more puzzles than citizens. Granted that earlier on this was due to technological constraints, but there was no need for Twilight Princess to be exactly the bloody same.

    This actually bothered me quite a bit in Kingdom Hearts. It seemed like several planets consisted of nothing but two large houses. Maybe it's explained later in the game or something.

  • ShadowfireShadowfire Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    Shukao wrote: »
    Aha, then we've stumped upon other case of bizarro video game logic - "Gets Better With Age". It doesn't make any sense for a magic item to become more powerful the older it gets, unless specifically stated in the games narrative. Equally as powerful over, say, 500 years? Yes, perfectly feasible if magic is independant of time, which in most games it generally is. Less powerful after 500 years? It can work (fading enchants, dissipation of magic etc). Theoretically, the item should get worse with age, rather than stronger.

    What!? I thought magical items were like whiskey. Or rum. Or maybe they just leech magicness from their surroundings.

    Magic is a stupid thing to debate in a thread about logic since the whole idea of magic is that it defies logic.

    Can we get back to the whole "rocket launchers can't blow up wooden doors" thing? Because that's always annoyed the fuck out of me. Likewise, in CoD4 my teammates can blow the hinges off a door with a shotgun, but I sure as hell can't. Apparently I don't have the cool kids shotgun. :P

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  • ScooterScooter Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    The thing I hate the MOST in any video game, to the point where I will turn the game off and not ever want to play it again, is nonsensical worlds.

    Zelda is the biggest offender. Welcome to the vast and prosperous kingdom of Hyrule! Hey buddy, you know your "kingdom" is a town, a horse ranch, a lake, a couple of trees, and a sandbox right? There's maybe 50 people living here. 50 people does not a kingdom make. Where are the farms, where do you get your food, what do you trade and barter with, and why are there no roads leading out of this shithole despite the fact you specifically mention the fact there are other population centers around.

    This, seriously, is why I've never finished a Zelda game. The world feels constructed and artificial, existing only for the purpose of housing more puzzles than citizens. Granted that earlier on this was due to technological constraints, but there was no need for Twilight Princess to be exactly the bloody same.

    This actually bothered me quite a bit in Kingdom Hearts. It seemed like several planets consisted of nothing but two large houses. Maybe it's explained later in the game or something.

    Ooh, this bugged the hell out of me in KotoR. You could be on a giant city-world like Taris, and everything of interest would be within 2 blocks of where you landed. It's actually a problem just about every sci-fi game that involves multiple planets. Everything on the planet worth seeing is in an area smaller than your average college campus.

  • jothkijothki Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    Dunxco wrote: »
    jothki wrote: »
    Dunxco wrote: »
    If some malevolent force was a problem 10, 100, 1000 etc. years ago, you can bet your bottom dollar that the previous heroes/ancient mystical race/gods just sealed it away instead of actually sorting out the problem. Then the malevolent force will break free during the current hero(es) time period to cause havoc, and it's up to the present hero(es) to rectify past mistakes and obliterating the evil, rather than sealing it back away again. Thus, nobody seems to learn from the mistakes of their elders. Ever. They just leave it up to the kids to handle it.

    It just seems like that because you only ever hear about the ancient evils that were sealed away and are about to break out. Plenty of evil could have been defeated and destroyed in the past, but you never hear about it because no one needs to care about it any more.

    That just creates more questions than answers. If there were hypothetically more evils that were destroyed in the past, so it's a moot point discussing them, then why only seal this evil away? Maybe because the evil was more powerful than the other hypothetical evils, and they couldn't destroy it, only seal it. Then why is the majority of the best equipment in fantasy games ancient weapons imbued with magical properties?

    Take Chrono Trigger for example - some of the best equipment to defeat Lavos, a threat in 1999 A.D., is gathered from time periods such as 65,000,000 B.C., 600 A.D. and 1000 A.D.

    All it does is create an inconsistent plot hole wherein the tools to defeat the big bad threat were around at the time when the menace originally reared its head, but the big bad was just locked away instead until a bunch of plucky upstarts get their hands on said weapons and destroy the baddie once and for all, despite the fact there was probably a group willing and capable enough to take down the bad guy when it first showed up.

    ... Unless the current heroes are fated or some stupid shit...

    It's not that you're so much more powerful than everyone else in the past, it's just that when that particular evil popped up the last time, the batch of heroes at that time happened to suck. If they had been better than you, there wouldn't have been a game.

    You're relying on the assumption that everything that is ancient is more powerful than what you have now. Even if the technology or magic is indeed better, sometimes you just get wimpy people.

  • PeewiPeewi Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    Ever notice how often ice can be melted, but not destroyed in any other way? I like how it was possible to blow up huge ice chunks with cannons in Twilight Princess, but other than that a heat source is very often required.

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  • The_SpaniardThe_Spaniard Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    You are all in a third level basement of someones home, in the gloom of the torch light you see a coin on the floor, you pick it up... STOP THIEF! You'll pay for what you have done!

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  • ShadowfireShadowfire Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    You are all in a third level basement of someones home, in the gloom of the torch light you see a coin on the floor, you pick it up... STOP THIEF! You'll pay for what you have done!

    :^:

    Also, why is it that no one in JRPGs ever asks "WHAT THE FUCK ARE YOU DOING IN MY HOUSE?!"

    Aside from the mystic family in Chrono Trigger, of course...

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  • The_SpaniardThe_Spaniard Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    You are all in a third level basement of someones home, in the gloom of the torch light you see a coin on the floor, you pick it up... STOP THIEF! You'll pay for what you have done!

    :^:

    Also, why is it that no one in JRPGs ever asks "WHAT THE FUCK ARE YOU DOING IN MY HOUSE?!"

    Aside from the mystic family in Chrono Trigger, of course...

    It's just fucking extremes! >:O

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  • SkutSkutSkutSkut Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    Darth_Mogs wrote: »
    Oh, cool. Nobody mentioned Cutscene Deaths yet.

    So...

    Cutscene Deaths.

    "Hey, I'm super awesome, and if I die in battle, just use a (insert recovery item here) on me and I'll be A-Okay! Wait, what, that's the main bad guy?

    Goddamnit. *Death warble*"

    I like "Plot Gun" for this too, if they get shot of course.

  • Delta AssaultDelta Assault Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    Oh man, where to start...

    Well first off, I just love those games where you can put away your gun, switch to a knife, and somehow... this allows you to run faster. Like, WTF? The gun didn't disappear, you're still carrying it somewhere on your body... why would holding a knife instead reduce your overall weight and allow you to move quicker? It makes absolutely no sense. Wasn't it the case in Counter-Strike? It's been a while, but I think it was. People on your team would immediately pull out their knives at the start of every match so they could leg it a bit quicker to the chokepoints. Absolutely retarded game mechanic. I think I saw the same thing happen in a gameplay video of Fallout 3. Hey, let's run faster because we put the gun back into our backpack and pulled out our knife. Yea, way to go... that makes a lot of fucking sense.

    And what about the super weak flashlights we always get to use in games? Like, the ones that only work for 30 seconds before you have to turn em off to recharge? Let's see, what games have these weakass flashlights... I think Half-Life, FEAR, and AvP 2 just to name a few. Cmon, where do they buy these piece of shit flashlights? Are the batteries really that weak? They seem to work forever, but you just need to let them recharge every 30 seconds? What are you recharging them with? Is there some perpetual motion device you use to crank em up? Is that how those work? Cause I know regular flashlights can work for hours without needing their batteries replaced. How they didn't decide to buy those regular good ones for use in Black Mesa, whereever-the-hell-FEAR-is, and the Colonial Marine Corps, I just don't know. It's mind boggling.

    Weapon balance in games is just silly sometimes. In almost every action game, you've got the pistol, then the rifle. Sometimes it's called an SMG. Now, the funny thing is... the pistol's bullet somehow seems a lot stronger then the rifle's. You'll pull out this pistol and it delivers a mighty semi automatic bang. Yet when you switch to this faster rifle or SMG, their bullets seem mighty underpowered. Like, the bullets are individually much weaker then the bullets in the humble pistol. When in reality, a rifle's bullets are actually going to be bigger or at least the same as the pistol's. Yet while you can snap off one or two rounds from a pistol to down an enemy, the rifle might require bucketloads of shots to put down the same enemy. Obviously, this isn't the case in every game, but it's a trend I've noticed in quite a few. It makes absolutely no sense. Why don't the rifle's bullets pack as much of a punch as the pistol's? It seems to be arbitrary balancing bullshit on the part of the developer. Good example of this phenomenon would be the assault rifle from Halo. You can use a few shots from the pistol (which somehow also has a scope) or use up 60 rounds from your rifle. Why does the rifle use plastic bbs instead of real bullets like the pistol? Hey, I'm not Bungie.

    Okay, now let's talk about another gun, the shotgun. The shotgun in a lot of games seems to be insanely short ranged. Like, I've seen water hoses with more cohesion at range. Classic example is the shotgun from Doom 3. Now, this thing sprays buckshot so wide that it only has an effective range of about five feet. Seriously, I'm not exaggerating here, you just shouldn't use it beyond five feet. The spread is that bad. It just defies logic, why would anyone make a shotgun that only works out to five feet? An honorary member could also be the assault rifle from Halo. No, it's not a shotgun, but it also has an effective range of about five feet. Why would anyone use a rifle with spray that wide? Who knows.

    In every sort of GTA open world game, all you have to do is jump into the car and push out the driver. They all have their doors unlocked for some reason. Is this really how people drive? They leave their doors unlocked? I sure as hell lock my doors when I drive my car. Do you? You should, precisely so you don't get someone kicking you to the curb and driving off in your ride. It's common sense, really. Also, if you grab a vacant car in a game, they'll always have their keys inside. No need to hot wire it or anything.

    In RTSs, you'll have battlecruisers the same size as five or six infantry soldiers. How does that make any sense? The goddamn battlecruiser's supposed to be the size of the whole fucking map, right? Why would they make it a buildable unit and then make it look as big as six soldiers? How does that do justice to the battlecruiser? Frankly, it seems a bit insulting. There are probably four or five hundred people on board the battlecruiser. Maybe more. Maybe it's over a thousand, like the Galaxy class Enterprise-D. Yet here it is, floating about five feet over the battlefield and looking comparable to a squad of marines. Why would anyone think this was a good idea?

    I recently watched a new gameplay video for AvP 3 and saw a marine being held down by an Alien, completely helpless, his gun nowhere to be seen. This pleased me, because it has always frustrated me how melee has gotten the shaft in first person games. Melee should be insanely scary, just because if the big bad monster actually makes it to you, you're not just going to get to shoot at it with your gun while it futilely claws away bits of your health and armor. If it gets into melee, it's going to knock your fucking gun out of your hands and proceed to rape your face off. That's what a melee enemy in a game should do. Yet it's never been portrayed this way. Both the previous AvP games just had you shooting aliens even at point blank range, negating their effectiveness. I'm glad to see that AvP 3 is gonna be different, giving melee enemies their teeth back. You should be scared of them surviving your ranged fire and getting into melee range. Guns never getting knocked out of your hands in FPSs was simply illogical and way too easy.

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