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Motorcyclin' the country side

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Posts

  • DhalphirDhalphir don't you open that trapdoor you're a fool if you dareRegistered User regular
    I've just run into the biggest problem with beginning to ride a bike.

    Convincing the wife that I won't spontaneously explode the first time I ride a bike on the road.

    Seriously, does anyone have any experience with this?

    My wife had a bad experience as a teenager with a scooter, and since then she's very frightened by motorised two-wheelers.

    I'm fully aware that motorbike riding is more dangerous than car driving, but I'm also aware that a significant part of the danger is entirely controllable by the motorcyclist – by being aware, safe, responsible, and well-trained. How do I help her see this? Does anyone have any direct experience with similar?

    Tube-san wrote:
    I apologise for my rudeness desu.
  • adytumadytum Registered User regular
    Buy Proficient Motorcyling and read it with her? It breaks down the risks and statistics very well.

    Alternately, tell her you'll take out a multi-million dollar life insurance policy and sign a DNR order?
    Spoiler:

    etxvv5.jpg
  • LindLind Registered User regular
    How about taking her along to watch some of your driving leassons when you practice at a parking lot or something like that and also get loads of good protective gear for yourself.

  • musanmanmusanman Registered User regular
    You aren't going to convince her that being a good rider negates the risk, because ultimately she will always think of "the other guy" that could easily change lanes or something and kill you.

    Take your kangaroo version of the MSF class, take it slow, and wear her down by talking about how much you love motorcycles all the time (this is mostly what I did :D)

    sic2sig.jpg
  • HounHoun Registered User regular
    My wife stopped obsessively worrying after following behind me in the car one day, and noting how safe and aware I was. After that, she learned to deal.

    I'm sure she still worries some, but she trusts me to be as safe as possible.

    Steam: DigitalArcanist | PSN: DigitalArcanist | NNID: DigitalArcanist | Backloggery: Houn
  • VeritasVRVeritasVR Registered User regular
    My parents still think I will die in a fire.

    CoH_infantry.jpg
    Let 'em eat fucking pineapples!
  • DhalphirDhalphir don't you open that trapdoor you're a fool if you dareRegistered User regular
    Houn wrote: »
    My wife stopped obsessively worrying after following behind me in the car one day, and noting how safe and aware I was. After that, she learned to deal.

    I'm sure she still worries some, but she trusts me to be as safe as possible.

    This i'm sure will help if i ever get the bike, but its that step that i have to take first.

    Tube-san wrote:
    I apologise for my rudeness desu.
  • DaedalusDaedalus Registered User regular
    Lemming wrote: »
    Oh god. I was having some trouble getting my Ninja 250 to start last night, the battery was pretty close to dead from sitting for a while, and I accidentally dropped the bike on its side because I thought I had pushed out the kickstand when I didn't. I left it at my friend's place last night and got a ride home, figuring I had flooded the carbs and it was just taking a while to try to jump it.

    Tonight I went over to pick it up, and somehow the bike started up on the first press of the starter, even though the night before the battery was dead. I ran it for about a minute at about 6k RPM to try to warm it up a bit, when it died. I looked at the ground and there was oil everywhere. Tracing the leak, it was coming out of the airbox.

    I'm going to take the bike apart tomorrow but what the fuck. Every last drop of oil in that bike leaked out of the airbox.

    There's a port where crankcase oil is supposed to flow into the bottom of the airbox in the event of overpressure or whatever. If it sat on its side for a while after you dropped it, you could have had a lot of oil flow into the airbox that way.

    Similar story: so last weekend I was doing the first oil change of a new year. I found that my local advanceazone now sells filters in the right size for my Ninja 250, so I just bought one of them even though they're the cheapo Fram filters because that way I didn't need to wait for shipping.

    I drain the oil, change the filter, put the plug back in, and add two quarts. Everything looks good. Start up the engine and immediately there's a quart of oil in my driveway. After trying to figure out where I screwed up, I find that the rubber gasket with the Fram filter broke when I put the filter on, so oil flowing past the filter went straight out the bottom of the bike. Ah, Fram.

    vvvvvv-dithw.png
  • VeritasVRVeritasVR Registered User regular
    edited February 2012
    Daedalus wrote:
    Lemming wrote: »
    Oh god. I was having some trouble getting my Ninja 250 to start last night, the battery was pretty close to dead from sitting for a while, and I accidentally dropped the bike on its side because I thought I had pushed out the kickstand when I didn't. I left it at my friend's place last night and got a ride home, figuring I had flooded the carbs and it was just taking a while to try to jump it.

    Tonight I went over to pick it up, and somehow the bike started up on the first press of the starter, even though the night before the battery was dead. I ran it for about a minute at about 6k RPM to try to warm it up a bit, when it died. I looked at the ground and there was oil everywhere. Tracing the leak, it was coming out of the airbox.

    I'm going to take the bike apart tomorrow but what the fuck. Every last drop of oil in that bike leaked out of the airbox.

    There's a port where crankcase oil is supposed to flow into the bottom of the airbox in the event of overpressure or whatever. If it sat on its side for a while after you dropped it, you could have had a lot of oil flow into the airbox that way.

    Similar story: so last weekend I was doing the first oil change of a new year. I found that my local advanceazone now sells filters in the right size for my Ninja 250, so I just bought one of them even though they're the cheapo Fram filters because that way I didn't need to wait for shipping.

    I drain the oil, change the filter, put the plug back in, and add two quarts. Everything looks good. Start up the engine and immediately there's a quart of oil in my driveway. After trying to figure out where I screwed up, I find that the rubber gasket with the Fram filter broke when I put the filter on, so oil flowing past the filter went straight out the bottom of the bike. Ah, Fram.

    Always always get the Kawasaki (tm) oil filter. Yes, the FRAM will work, but the FRAM may also do that. That sucks.

    VeritasVR on
    CoH_infantry.jpg
    Let 'em eat fucking pineapples!
  • DaedalusDaedalus Registered User regular
    I was considering this year selling my Ninja250 and getting a Honda CBR600 or something in that general category.

    Then I looked at what it would do to my insurance prices. Holy damn, I have minimum liability only right now and even then it would more that double the rates. What are some cheap motorcycle insurance companies? I'm with Progressive now.

    vvvvvv-dithw.png
  • musanmanmusanman Registered User regular
    Daedalus wrote: »
    I was considering this year selling my Ninja250 and getting a Honda CBR600 or something in that general category.

    Then I looked at what it would do to my insurance prices. Holy damn, I have minimum liability only right now and even then it would more that double the rates. What are some cheap motorcycle insurance companies? I'm with Progressive now.

    I pay about $800 / year for my insurance. Apparently a 1050cc "sports bike" doesn't end well for a lot of people.

    sic2sig.jpg
  • adytumadytum Registered User regular
    I have minimum liability coverage and uninsured motorist coverage on my two bikes, plus medical on the one I commute on. My yearly premium is ~$150 with Progressive.

    You could try Geico, but I absolutely loathe them as a company and could never recommend anyone doing business with them.

    etxvv5.jpg
  • Flying CouchFlying Couch Registered User regular
    Daedalus wrote: »
    I was considering this year selling my Ninja250 and getting a Honda CBR600 or something in that general category.

    Then I looked at what it would do to my insurance prices. Holy damn, I have minimum liability only right now and even then it would more that double the rates. What are some cheap motorcycle insurance companies? I'm with Progressive now.
    I'm with Allstate. It's right around a thousand a year for me. Much better than it was in a car.
    VeritasVR wrote: »
    My parents still think I will die in a fire.

    My parents were never huge on it, but it didn't take them long to come to terms with the fact that I was gonna ride whether liked it or not. Girlfriend was the same way.

    In other news: Harley 883s with clubmans and rearsets. Y/N?

    harley-davidson-nigh_460x0w.jpg

  • hawkboxhawkbox Registered User regular
    Dhalphir wrote:
    I've just run into the biggest problem with beginning to ride a bike.

    Convincing the wife that I won't spontaneously explode the first time I ride a bike on the road.

    Seriously, does anyone have any experience with this?


    My wife had a bad experience as a teenager with a scooter, and since then she's very frightened by motorised two-wheelers.

    I'm fully aware that motorbike riding is more dangerous than car driving, but I'm also aware that a significant part of the danger is entirely controllable by the motorcyclist – by being aware, safe, responsible, and well-trained. How do I help her see this? Does anyone have any direct experience with similar?

    I'm finally getting into this thread, my method was to break up with the girlfriend who didn't want me to ride. My current girlfriend however is buying my Versys off of me and I am getting a Triumph Tiger 800XC to replace it. I dread what my insurance rate is going to go to moving from a 650 to an 800.

    However, you just need to figure out a way to turn her on by having motorbikes. ;)

    Virtue flourishes in the most unexpected places.
  • VeritasVRVeritasVR Registered User regular
    I also have Progressive through USAA. It's pretty good.

    The only thing that will make me get rid of my Ninja 250 is if there's another bike just like the Ninja 250 without a fucking carburetor god dammit.

    CoH_infantry.jpg
    Let 'em eat fucking pineapples!
  • musanmanmusanman Registered User regular
    Daedalus wrote: »
    I was considering this year selling my Ninja250 and getting a Honda CBR600 or something in that general category.

    Then I looked at what it would do to my insurance prices. Holy damn, I have minimum liability only right now and even then it would more that double the rates. What are some cheap motorcycle insurance companies? I'm with Progressive now.
    I'm with Allstate. It's right around a thousand a year for me. Much better than it was in a car.
    VeritasVR wrote: »
    My parents still think I will die in a fire.

    My parents were never huge on it, but it didn't take them long to come to terms with the fact that I was gonna ride whether liked it or not. Girlfriend was the same way.

    In other news: Harley 883s with clubmans and rearsets. Y/N?

    harley-davidson-nigh_460x0w.jpg

    it just seems so bloated, the cafe racers should be lean...as that was the whole idea

    sic2sig.jpg
  • necroSYSnecroSYS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Dhalphir wrote:
    I've just run into the biggest problem with beginning to ride a bike.

    Convincing the wife that I won't spontaneously explode the first time I ride a bike on the road.

    Seriously, does anyone have any experience with this?

    My wife had a bad experience as a teenager with a scooter, and since then she's very frightened by motorised two-wheelers.

    I'm fully aware that motorbike riding is more dangerous than car driving, but I'm also aware that a significant part of the danger is entirely controllable by the motorcyclist – by being aware, safe, responsible, and well-trained. How do I help her see this? Does anyone have any direct experience with similar?

    I paid for my wife to take the basic motorcycle safety course with me. She enjoyed it, but she doesn't feel comfortable (yet!) on anything bigger than 150ccs, so I consider the biggest benefit to be that she realistically understands the risks and skillset involved in riding a motorcycle.

    However, I'd take issue with your notion that a significant part of the danger in riding is controllable by the motorcyclist. Most of the danger in riding (once you get past the stupid things you learn to avoid in the Basic Safety course) is due to your invisibility to everyone else on the road. You can anticipate it and try to mitigate it, but there's only so much you can do.

    There's no point in you getting both of yourselves all worked up and ready to chart the undiscovered country, then having her flush crimson red, run to the bathroom, and spend twenty minutes straining and grunting and stressing out because you're all ready to deliver your package but there's a three inch thick Sunday paper clogging up the mail slot.
  • necroSYSnecroSYS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    This thread reminded me that I seriously need to get back on a bike. I loved my Honda VT750C (until I laid it down to avoid smashing into a jerk in a car and the insurance company totalled it), but I've had my eye on a 2009-2010 Harley FXDF for a couple of years now. Need that raise from the boss first.

    There's no point in you getting both of yourselves all worked up and ready to chart the undiscovered country, then having her flush crimson red, run to the bathroom, and spend twenty minutes straining and grunting and stressing out because you're all ready to deliver your package but there's a three inch thick Sunday paper clogging up the mail slot.
  • musanmanmusanman Registered User regular
    necroSYS wrote: »
    This thread reminded me that I seriously need to get back on a bike. I loved my Honda VT750C (until I laid it down to avoid smashing into a jerk in a car and the insurance company totalled it), but I've had my eye on a 2009-2010 Harley FXDF for a couple of years now. Need that raise from the boss first.

    friends don't let friends buy harleys

    sic2sig.jpg
  • necroSYSnecroSYS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Why? Other than having to pay for the name...

    I don't like the aesthetics of most of the import cruisers in that engine size.

    There's no point in you getting both of yourselves all worked up and ready to chart the undiscovered country, then having her flush crimson red, run to the bathroom, and spend twenty minutes straining and grunting and stressing out because you're all ready to deliver your package but there's a three inch thick Sunday paper clogging up the mail slot.
  • musanmanmusanman Registered User regular
    most of the import cruisers are boring I'll give you that, triumph makes a blacked out thunderbird that is pretty fucking slick

    sic2sig.jpg
  • necroSYSnecroSYS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Huh, yeah, the Thunderbird Storm looks like a definite contender.

    Not sure how the 100 lbs heavier vs. 100ccs more engine will shake out, though.

    There's no point in you getting both of yourselves all worked up and ready to chart the undiscovered country, then having her flush crimson red, run to the bathroom, and spend twenty minutes straining and grunting and stressing out because you're all ready to deliver your package but there's a three inch thick Sunday paper clogging up the mail slot.
  • hawkboxhawkbox Registered User regular
    VeritasVR wrote:
    I also have Progressive through USAA. It's pretty good.

    The only thing that will make me get rid of my Ninja 250 is if there's another bike just like the Ninja 250 without a fucking carburetor god dammit.

    Honda CBR 250? It's new and looks really nice.

    Virtue flourishes in the most unexpected places.
  • DhalphirDhalphir don't you open that trapdoor you're a fool if you dareRegistered User regular
    as a total mechanical newbie, whats the downsides of a carby vs EFI?

    Tube-san wrote:
    I apologise for my rudeness desu.
  • VeritasVRVeritasVR Registered User regular
    edited February 2012
    hawkbox wrote: »
    VeritasVR wrote:
    I also have Progressive through USAA. It's pretty good.

    The only thing that will make me get rid of my Ninja 250 is if there's another bike just like the Ninja 250 without a fucking carburetor god dammit.

    Honda CBR 250? It's new and looks really nice.
    Not a fan of the single cylinder more than I am of a carburetor.

    Dhalphir wrote: »
    as a total mechanical newbie, whats the downsides of a carby vs EFI?
    Fuel injection means that you don't have to choke the bitch. Manual choke is one of the reasons I don't ride in the cold, because a cold motherfucker stalls in the middle of an intersection even on full choke. That's annoying at best and dangerous at worst.

    VeritasVR on
    CoH_infantry.jpg
    Let 'em eat fucking pineapples!
  • DhalphirDhalphir don't you open that trapdoor you're a fool if you dareRegistered User regular
    Choke...I assume you mean rev it when I first start it?

    As for the temperature, the coldest it ever gets during the day in Australia is around 10 degrees Celsius, even in the dead of winter, so that isn't likely to be a problem.

    The problem, though, if carbys are things to avoid, is that I really want a Ninja, but the CBR is EFI.

    I'm taking an introductory lesson next weekend to learn to ride in a carpark before I go get my permit, and the instructor teaches on a CBR, so I'll be able to get a good comparison between that and my friend's Ninja.

    Tube-san wrote:
    I apologise for my rudeness desu.
  • VeritasVRVeritasVR Registered User regular
    Dhalphir wrote: »
    Choke...I assume you mean rev it when I first start it?

    As for the temperature, the coldest it ever gets during the day in Australia is around 10 degrees Celsius, even in the dead of winter, so that isn't likely to be a problem.

    The problem, though, if carbys are things to avoid, is that I really want a Ninja, but the CBR is EFI.

    I'm taking an introductory lesson next weekend to learn to ride in a carpark before I go get my permit, and the instructor teaches on a CBR, so I'll be able to get a good comparison between that and my friend's Ninja.

    The choke is a lever that you pull, and it increases the amount of fuel-to-air ratio (basically choking the air off). Helps start in the winter when it's cold, but the Ninja seems to need more than max choke sometimes. If you don't keep the RPMs up by holding the throttle open when you're idling, the thing will stall and die.

    It could be my carbs need cleaning, but ugh. Just ugh.

    CoH_infantry.jpg
    Let 'em eat fucking pineapples!
  • OSUJumpManOSUJumpMan Registered User regular
    edited February 2012
    So I've been wanting to get myself a motorcycle for a few years now and the timing has never quite worked out. I've never really rode one before (besides the dirtbike my buddy had in middle school) so I'm planning to take the safety course. However, reading this thread I'm starting to question how big a bike I might need.

    I like the simple aesthetic of the standard and cruiser bikes and I'd been looking at something around 100-200cc mostly because they're cheap and cost is a factor. The Kawasaki EL125 was one of the main bikes I'd looked into. Should I be looking at something bigger even though I'll be a first time rider? I'm 6'5" and 205 lbs at my prime (closer to 230 now) so I'm a fairly big guy and I'd be using the bike to get to grad school in/around Chicago so I don't need anything off-road really.

    OSUJumpMan on
    camo_sig2.png
  • hawkboxhawkbox Registered User regular
    VeritasVR wrote:
    hawkbox wrote: »
    VeritasVR wrote:
    I also have Progressive through USAA. It's pretty good.

    The only thing that will make me get rid of my Ninja 250 is if there's another bike just like the Ninja 250 without a fucking carburetor god dammit.

    Honda CBR 250? It's new and looks really nice.
    Not a fan of the single cylinder more than I am of a carburetor.

    Dhalphir wrote: »
    as a total mechanical newbie, whats the downsides of a carby vs EFI?
    Fuel injection means that you don't have to choke the bitch. Manual choke is one of the reasons I don't ride in the cold, because a cold motherfucker stalls in the middle of an intersection even on full choke. That's annoying at best and dangerous at worst.

    The new CBR is a one lunger? Really. I didn't know that.

    Virtue flourishes in the most unexpected places.
  • japanjapan Registered User regular
    hawkbox wrote: »
    VeritasVR wrote:
    hawkbox wrote: »
    VeritasVR wrote:
    I also have Progressive through USAA. It's pretty good.

    The only thing that will make me get rid of my Ninja 250 is if there's another bike just like the Ninja 250 without a fucking carburetor god dammit.

    Honda CBR 250? It's new and looks really nice.
    Not a fan of the single cylinder more than I am of a carburetor.

    Dhalphir wrote: »
    as a total mechanical newbie, whats the downsides of a carby vs EFI?
    Fuel injection means that you don't have to choke the bitch. Manual choke is one of the reasons I don't ride in the cold, because a cold motherfucker stalls in the middle of an intersection even on full choke. That's annoying at best and dangerous at worst.

    The new CBR is a one lunger? Really. I didn't know that.

    The 250 is more of a scaled-up CBR125R than a scaled down CBR600. The 125 and the 250 are different bikes from the larger capacity models, aimed at different markets. All they really have in common is the styling.

    Is the US getting the KTM Duke 200? It's a 200 rather than a 250 (but makes the same power as the CBR250R), and it's a naked, but it's another option of that small capacity commuter type.

  • DhalphirDhalphir don't you open that trapdoor you're a fool if you dareRegistered User regular
    OSUJumpMan wrote: »
    So I've been wanting to get myself a motorcycle for a few years now and the timing has never quite worked out. I've never really rode one before (besides the dirtbike my buddy had in middle school) so I'm planning to take the safety course. However, reading this thread I'm starting to question how big a bike I might need.

    I like the simple aesthetic of the standard and cruiser bikes and I'd been looking at something around 100-200cc mostly because they're cheap and cost is a factor. The Kawasaki EL125 was one of the main bikes I'd looked into. Should I be looking at something bigger even though I'll be a first time rider? I'm 6'5" and 205 lbs at my prime (closer to 230 now) so I'm a fairly big guy and I'd be using the bike to get to grad school in/around Chicago so I don't need anything off-road really.

    if you're a big guy you will have to rev the guts out of a 125 to get anywhere, from what I've heard.

    If there's no restrictions where you are, try a 250 and a 500 and see what feels better.

    Tube-san wrote:
    I apologise for my rudeness desu.
  • musanmanmusanman Registered User regular
    Guys this may not be the popular opinion, but insisting on riding a 250 really isn't necessary. I'm not going to advocate buying a 600RR or anything like that as a beginner, but keep in mind you can do 45 and hit a tree on a 250 just as easily as on that RR. If you find a great deal on a 750 cruiser, or a mid range standard bike you should take it. I have had friends start on 500GSFs, 650r (great starter), and I started on a 600 shadow.

    You can act like an idiot on any motorcycle, and while I appreciate the advice of taking it slow and riding within your means most of that is going to be between your ears, not the bhp between your legs :D.

    sic2sig.jpg
  • DhalphirDhalphir don't you open that trapdoor you're a fool if you dareRegistered User regular
    for a lot of countries, beginners are restricted by law.

    Tube-san wrote:
    I apologise for my rudeness desu.
  • japanjapan Registered User regular
    Also if you're commuting or whatever, 125s and 250s are frequently much easier on the fuel consumption than bigger bikes, with a few notable exceptions like the single cylinder BMWs.

  • DhalphirDhalphir don't you open that trapdoor you're a fool if you dareRegistered User regular
    Whats the real-world difference between a bike that is carburettor-fueled and one that is fuel-injected, given I'm in Australia where the fact that carbys struggle in cold weather isn't an issue.

    Tube-san wrote:
    I apologise for my rudeness desu.
  • LindLind Registered User regular
    Do any driving really high up above sea level where the air is thin? My friend had some trouble with his old bike on our norway trip but nothing bad really.

  • VeritasVRVeritasVR Registered User regular
    edited February 2012
    musanman wrote: »
    Guys this may not be the popular opinion, but insisting on riding a 250 really isn't necessary. I'm not going to advocate buying a 600RR or anything like that as a beginner, but keep in mind you can do 45 and hit a tree on a 250 just as easily as on that RR. If you find a great deal on a 750 cruiser, or a mid range standard bike you should take it. I have had friends start on 500GSFs, 650r (great starter), and I started on a 600 shadow.

    You can act like an idiot on any motorcycle, and while I appreciate the advice of taking it slow and riding within your means most of that is going to be between your ears, not the bhp between your legs :D.

    But getting the smaller engine means less money, gas, insurance, depreciation, sales difficulty, and more forgiveness if you accidently pop the clutch at a stop-light.

    Dhalphir wrote: »
    Whats the real-world difference between a bike that is carburettor-fueled and one that is fuel-injected, given I'm in Australia where the fact that carbys struggle in cold weather isn't an issue.

    Have to clean them from time to time and that suuuuucks. Also, even if it's a hot summer day, you might need to choke it.

    CHOKE IT GOOD

    VeritasVR on
    CoH_infantry.jpg
    Let 'em eat fucking pineapples!
  • adytumadytum Registered User regular
    Does anyone ride with a darkly-tinted visor? I may have just bought some new gear, and I'm wondering if I'll still need to wear sunglasses when I'm riding with the sun in my eyes.

    etxvv5.jpg
  • SliderSlider Registered User regular
    So, I'm in Arizona for an indeterminate amount of time and it's kind of sunny here.

    I have decided to get a bike. What do you think about this GSXR? http://phoenix.craigslist.org/evl/mcy/2864171455.html

    11,000 miles. $7,000. Too expensive? What is a good price?

  • adytumadytum Registered User regular
    Have you ever ridden before? Are you licensed?

    Also, that listing includes gear. Never wear a used helmet.

    etxvv5.jpg
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