The holiday hangout will go online tomorrow! If there's anything in the regular subforums that you're going to want to access over the holidays, copy it now while it's still accessible.
Don't like the snow? You can make a bookmark with the following text instead of a url: javascript:snowStorm.toggleSnow(). Clicking it will toggle the snow on and off.
Our new Indie Games subforum is now open for business in G&T. Go and check it out, you might land a code for a free game. If you're developing an indie game and want to post about it, follow these directions. If you don't, he'll break your legs! Hahaha! Seriously though.
Our rules have been updated and given their own forum. Go and look at them! They are nice, and there may be new ones that you didn't know about! Hooray for rules! Hooray for The System! Hooray for Conforming!

Dogs and Native Fruits

TK-42-1TK-42-1 Registered User regular
edited August 2009 in Help / Advice Forum
I have a Texas Persimmon tree in my back yard. Lately, my dogs have shown a pretty intense desire to eat the fruits that have been dropping over the last month or so. I would think that if the plant was actually harmful to them I would have seen signs by now. However, every time they've been out eating them I can tell they are on a kind of high or something. Almost like when you give little kids sugar. They are just up and having a good time.

My question is: Does anyone know of a place to find out if this is harmful or addictive to dogs? Should I go out and harvest the tree of fruit so they cant get any? My google-fu has failed me.

TK-42-1 on
sig.jpgsmugriders.gif

Posts

  • NightDragonNightDragon Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    It looks like they could potentially get diarrhea from the fruit, or an intestinal obstruction from the seeds.

    Source: http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=2+1659&aid=1030

    Aside from that, it doesn't seem especially harmful.

    rotate.php BloggerLink.gifTumblrLink.gif
  • GafferGaffer Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    This is probably too specific to be included on a list of pet poisons (chocolate, antifreeze, etc.) You could try contacting your vet about it, though he/she probably won't know off the top of his/her head. More than likely your vet will do a bit of digging and get you an answer of you'll be given a contact to try. Have you considered contacting "doggy" poison control? No idea where you might find a number for that, though I'm certain they exist.

    Good to see you're thinking about your animals (future vet here I hope.)

    Edit: NightDragon's list was sort of what I was referring to at the top of my post. Didn't realize it covered as much as it did. Couldn't hurt to do a follow-up with a poison control if you're concerned how the persimmon is being metabolized by your dog though.

    If the National Association of Vehicle Fuckers insists that banging the business end of a 68 Chevy was the premeire orgasm, I would still take the word of Doctors who explained that, "No, that is in fact bad for your wang."
  • TK-42-1TK-42-1 Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    What made me worry is that when I'm picking up their poop out of the back I noticed that it was darker than normal and had the seeds in it. On top of that with their sugar-rush behavior i just wanted to make sure it wasn't poisonous.

    I'm no future vet, but I do love my dogs. They've basically our kids. Both are rescues and we couldn't be happier with them. (except one of them ate my vintage tusken raider figurine today X()

    Thanks for that link. It's pretty awesome.

    sig.jpgsmugriders.gif
  • ImprovoloneImprovolone Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    Vets (well, the receptionists who are pretty good) are pretty good at talking to people for free

    Voice actor for hire. My time is free if your project is!
  • GafferGaffer Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    TK-42-1 wrote: »
    I'm no future vet, but I do love my dogs.

    I was trying to be self referential, but apparently spending all day living/working on a farm drains one's ability to use clear punctuation. :lol:

    If you're concerned about stool, consider bringing a fresh sample to your vet and have them eyeball it. If they're worth their salt, they'll take a few minutes and discuss the problem at no charge (especially if you come in and get your nails trimmed at the same time.) I don't know how helpful you may find receptionists. At the clinic where I spent some time learning the ropes, the doctor/techs handled the phone and were usually good about dispensing advice when they had a free moment (especially to their clients/ potential clients.) These are the people I'd focus on talking to for the best answers anyways.

    Good luck!

    If the National Association of Vehicle Fuckers insists that banging the business end of a 68 Chevy was the premeire orgasm, I would still take the word of Doctors who explained that, "No, that is in fact bad for your wang."
  • mtsmts Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    the poop is dark and seedy since it is probably ful of dark and seedy fruit.

    i would do your best to limit their intake but its probably not poisonous and more so to avoid diarhea

    camo_sig.png
  • KakodaimonosKakodaimonos Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    Hmm. Is it a true texas persimmon or a black persimmon? Texas persimmons are nasty and only somewhat edible. You can eat the fruits, but they are really, really acidic and will make you puke if you eat enough of them. It's not fatal, but keep the fruit cleaned up so they don't eat it.

    Black persimmons are tasty treats when they're ripe.

  • KivutarKivutar Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    Hmm. Is it a true texas persimmon or a black persimmon? Texas persimmons are nasty and only somewhat edible. You can eat the fruits, but they are really, really acidic and will make you puke if you eat enough of them. It's not fatal, but keep the fruit cleaned up so they don't eat it.

    Black persimmons are tasty treats when they're ripe.
    The link given in the OP points to a black persimmon.

  • DmanDman Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    Texas persimmon fruit is edible and used in puddings and custards. The
    fruit pulp produces an indelible black stain. Mexicans use it to dye
    animal hides [30,34,41].

    Wildlife use Texas persimmon for food, shelter, and cover. Coyote,
    raccoon, ringtail, foxes, and other mammals and birds eat the fruit
    [1,14].

    http://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/plants/tree/diotex/all.html

    If humans and coyote's can eat it your dogs should be fine.

  • seasleepyseasleepy Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    I don't know if this is even reasonable for the kind of fruit it is or how long it was on the ground, but is it possible the fruit had fermented? That could explain odd behavior in your dogs. (Also, if this is the case, you probably should try to keep them from getting at it since there could be bacterial nasties in there.)

    It was amusing to have Massachusetts as part of our country, but now, of course, like so much of the coastal nation, it no longer qualifies as America.
  • EskimoDaveEskimoDave Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    seasleepy wrote: »
    I don't know if this is even reasonable for the kind of fruit it is or how long it was on the ground, but is it possible the fruit had fermented? That could explain odd behavior in your dogs. (Also, if this is the case, you probably should try to keep them from getting at it since there could be bacterial nasties in there.)

    thats what I was thinking. Your dog is getting drunk.

    I had a friend in a high school who had birds get drunk of the cherries in front yard.

Sign In or Register to comment.