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Let's talk about relocation!

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Posts

  • HoovesHooves Registered User
    edited August 2009
    man I am always astounded when I hear people talk about how long you can expect to remain unemployed or how long it has taken them to find a job themselves. 9 months? The longest I've ever gone without being able to find employment was a little over a month.

    Heck when I moved to seattle last august I went through about 5 jobs in 6 months. I started at a gas station because it was the quickest thing I could find and once I had a steady income I kept looking and kept finding better oppurtunities.

    Also I only had about a thousand bucks in my pocket when I arrived. Granted that was pretty stupid and I had a rough go of it for a while.

  • VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User
    edited August 2009
    I can tell you that in Boston it could take 2-3 months at minimum to find a job that you can live off of. You could find a cheap job in a couple weeks but you won't be able to pay your rent.

  • CorvusCorvus Caw? VancouverRegistered User regular
    edited August 2009
    Since you plan to go to school in your new city, I think the advice given previously in the thread that you should apply to schools and see what your options are before moving is probably a good idea. It would suck if you moved to some place you loved living in, but couldn't get into any of the schools there.

    Also, what Melkster said about putting up with boredom to achieve a goal. Unless maybe you were dealing with some sort of depression at the time, being bored and frustrated isn't going to be seen as a a good reason for quitting school. There are boring, frustrating, de-motivating things everywhere in life, especially in this economy, and you'll very likely be confronted with similar stuff later on in life.

    Have you thought about how you will answer a question about the issue in a job interview? I'd recommend you do so, so you have a positive way to spin it. Just don't go with the Mark McGuire "I'm not here to talk about the past" :P

    A re-location specific bit of advice, don't move without having visited the place you're moving to for at least a weekend, if not a week.

  • PodlyPodly good moleman to youRegistered User regular
    edited August 2009
    Moving to a city requires a bitchload of cash. For an apartment, you will need at LEAST first month and a security deposit equal to the first month, and more often then not you are required to pay last month's rent and sometimes a broker's fee. Then you need to pay electricity, gas, internet, etc. Will you have to change your food bill? How much furniture / clothes are you brining, how will you bring it there, and what will you need to buy. Will you be brining food staples -- dry goods, cooking oil, canned goods, etc. And that's all just to get there.

    You need to research the neighborhood. For instance, if you are moving to new york it is a much better idea to move to someplace like woodlawn or greenpoint -- someplace very close to manhattan but costs much less than manhattan.

    You also should think about moving someplace where you have a basic network. Even if its just so that they can show you around a few times and can introduce you to new people, it can help immensely.

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  • DasUberEdwardDasUberEdward Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    Corvus wrote: »
    Since you plan to go to school in your new city, I think the advice given previously in the thread that you should apply to schools and see what your options are before moving is probably a good idea. It would suck if you moved to some place you loved living in, but couldn't get into any of the schools there.

    Also, what Melkster said about putting up with boredom to achieve a goal. Unless maybe you were dealing with some sort of depression at the time, being bored and frustrated isn't going to be seen as a a good reason for quitting school. There are boring, frustrating, de-motivating things everywhere in life, especially in this economy, and you'll very likely be confronted with similar stuff later on in life.

    Have you thought about how you will answer a question about the issue in a job interview? I'd recommend you do so, so you have a positive way to spin it. Just don't go with the Mark McGuire "I'm not here to talk about the past" :P

    A re-location specific bit of advice, don't move without having visited the place you're moving to for at least a weekend, if not a week.

    Yeah there was a bit of depression in there too and I did make some visits to the school psych to figure it all out. And yeah i've addressed the issue and on the bright side i'll have a years worth of academics form another albeit lesser institution on my side along with three years worth of credits.

    But yeah I understand that placing myself in a position where I can enter a school should be a priority and it is.

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