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Is the world more blue or more brown?

LurkLurk Registered User
edited November 2009 in Help / Advice Forum
There isn't much to do in a hospital, so I have been fooling around with my eyes (closing one eye, than the other...exciting stuff) to kill time. This resulted me in remembering that my eyes have different color balance. Not sure if that is a real term, but that's what I call it.

My left eye sees the world in a very slight blue tint.

My right eye sees the world in a very slight brown tint.

My left eye is also tiny bit more clear in seeing at long distances than my right eye.

This creates interesting scenarios where I have a visible line on the peripheral of my vision where things are more clear on the left peripheral than on the right. I very rarely notice the color difference though, unless I am looking at a white wall for a long time.

So, I have been wondering, what tint is our world? Blue or brown?

Lurk on
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Posts

  • ZombiemamboZombiemambo Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Lurk wrote: »
    There isn't much to do in a hospital, so I have been fooling around with my eyes (closing one eye, than the other...exciting stuff) to kill time. This resulted me in remembering that my eyes have different color balance. Not sure if that is a real term, but that's what I call it.

    My left eye sees the world in a very slight blue tint.

    My right eye sees the world in a very slight brown tint.

    My left eye is also tiny bit more clear in seeing at long distances than my right eye.

    This creates interesting scenarios where I have a visible line on the peripheral of my vision where things are more clear on the left peripheral than on the right. I very rarely notice the color difference though, unless I am looking at a white wall for a long time.

    So, I have been wondering, what tint is our world? Blue or brown?

    Depends on the lighting.

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  • PolloDiabloPolloDiablo Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    It's yellow. Maybe you're color blind.

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  • TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu ___________PIGEON _________San Diego, CA Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
  • JasconiusJasconius sword criminal Flo-ridaRegistered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Our world is more blue due to the properties of the elemental mixture of air (actually it may not be the air itself, but the water content in the air, I'll need a fact check on that). The farther away objects appear, the bluer they seem, this is the same reason why deeper water is blue/brown/green instead of clear as if you had some in the palm of your hand.

  • SliderSlider Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    I'm always thought it resembled sh*t. So....definitely brownish.

  • ZombiemamboZombiemambo Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Jasconius wrote: »
    Our world is more blue due to the properties of the elemental mixture of air (actually it may not be the air itself, but the water content in the air, I'll need a fact check on that). The farther away objects appear, the bluer they seem, this is the same reason why deeper water is blue/brown/green instead of clear as if you had some in the palm of your hand.

    Is it? I recall that the sky is blue because, by the time the light hits earth, the bands have separated and the only wavelength we can see is blue. So, couldn't things be more blue as you get farther away because there's more light between you and the object?

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  • LurkLurk Registered User
    edited November 2009
    For the record, I am not color blind. I am trusting my left eye's judgment more because it also sees better at longer distances. My right eye is a slacker.

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  • NightDragonNightDragon Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    I think my eyes do something similar, but not all the time...I think in situations where my eyes have been closed for a long time (like sleepin'...and maybe if one eye was under a bit of pressure, like from my hand or something)...then if I wake up and check both eyes individually, one shows a warm tint to everything, and one shows a cool tint.

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  • SmokeStacksSmokeStacks License Number 137596Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Are you currently on any pain medications right now?

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  • proXimityproXimity Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    It would seem your right eye is a bit nearsighted compared to your left, that's not terribly uncommon. Personally, I have one eye quite nearsighted and one only a little bit nearsighted.

    As for color differences, what you view can really depend on if you've been looking through a certain color for a while- try wearing some of those red/blue 3D glasses for a while, and after you take them off one eye will view everything with a cold color temperature and the other with a warm temp.

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  • L|amaL|ama Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Yeah I noticed this when I was about 12 and spent the rest of the afternoon walking around looking at different things and blinking, must have looked like I was having a seizure or something.
    Jasconius wrote: »
    Our world is more blue due to the properties of the elemental mixture of air (actually it may not be the air itself, but the water content in the air, I'll need a fact check on that). The farther away objects appear, the bluer they seem, this is the same reason why deeper water is blue/brown/green instead of clear as if you had some in the palm of your hand.

    Is it? I recall that the sky is blue because, by the time the light hits earth, the bands have separated and the only wavelength we can see is blue. So, couldn't things be more blue as you get farther away because there's more light between you and the object?

    You're both kind of wrong! :P This is the main reason for the sky's colours, but only the strength of it depends on the medium. Red light is always scattered more than blue light, because the scattering depends on the wavelength of light.



    My answer to the OP would be a boring almost philosophical one: You can only define the colour balance relative to another colour balance, so unless you rip out your eye and have turns at replacing it with a lot of other peoples', you're never going to know.

  • BloodySlothBloodySloth Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    My eyes are the same way with the orange/blue tints. I've always wondered if it was a normal thing that no one really notices/talks about, or if I'm just weird.

  • MovitzMovitz Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    My eyes are the same way with the orange/blue tints. I've always wondered if it was a normal thing that no one really notices/talks about, or if I'm just weird.

    I think all eyes are like this, lot's of people just never notices. I read a theory somewhere that it had something to do with our depth perception but I can't find a decent source for that now.

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  • AwkAwk Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Our world is in no tint. Color does not exist, it is perceived by the individual.
    Im also pretty sure you have a type of color blindness in one eye. You seem to be lacking a type of photoreceptor in your eye that makes you see only part of color (brown'ish). Its looking at color in a 2-dimensional view.

  • MovitzMovitz Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Awk wrote: »
    Our world is in no tint. Color does not exist, it is perceived by the individual.
    Im also pretty sure you have a type of color blindness in one eye. You seem to be lacking a type of photoreceptor in your eye that makes you see only part of color (brown'ish). Its looking at color in a 2-dimensional view.

    Every single one I've pointed this out to realized that they also have a different color temperatures on their eyes. Easiest way to see it is looking at a white wall in indirect sunlight. I'm looking right now at a white wall but with indoor lights and it's pretty hard to see a difference.

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  • TK-42-1TK-42-1 Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    I've always noticed my eyes having a red/green tint like old TVs did. Right eye is red/left is green

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  • FireflashFireflash Montreal, QCRegistered User regular
    edited November 2009
    I've also noticed this many years ago, and I sometimes compare my 2 eyes when I'm bored. There's a difference in color perception between my 2 eyes, but it's very small. You have to pay attention to notice it.

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  • EncEnc FloridaRegistered User regular
    edited November 2009
    The world is either blurry or covered in strange moving dots. I don't know which is more accurate.

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  • LeztaLezta Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
  • underdonkunderdonk __BANNED USERS regular
    edited November 2009
    Awk wrote: »
    Our world is in no tint. Color does not exist, it is perceived by the individual.

    I'm having a really hard time wrapping my head around this statement.

    Back in the day, bucko, we just had an A and a B button... and we liked it.
  • edited November 2009
    My eyes vary depending on which one has been open longer (If I close one eye for a while, when I re-open it everything seems a bit brownish compared to the other).

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  • GihgehlsGihgehls Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    My left eye perceives color a little warmer than my right eye. (or is my right eye seeing things a little cooler than the left?!)

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  • TK-42-1TK-42-1 Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    underdonk wrote: »
    Awk wrote: »
    Our world is in no tint. Color does not exist, it is perceived by the individual.

    I'm having a really hard time wrapping my head around this statement.

    what can really fuck you up is how do you know if what you perceive as red isnt what i percieve as blue?

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  • DekuStickDekuStick Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    My left eye sees colors just a tiny tiny bit more washed out than the right. And I would have never known if it wasn't for this thread. Thank you.

  • KazakaKazaka Registered User
    edited November 2009
    I think the brown tint is really more like red, and maybe that has something to do with the way 3-d glasses work.

    Also this is like an accidental post-modernist thread.

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  • MovitzMovitz Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    underdonk wrote: »
    Awk wrote: »
    Our world is in no tint. Color does not exist, it is perceived by the individual.

    I'm having a really hard time wrapping my head around this statement.

    It's a pretty pretentious statement but it's not really saying anything. Wavelengths of light exists in absolute values, colors don't because it's the individual perception of those waves. I.e what's purple to you might just be violet to someone else :P

    [edit] I suck at quotes

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  • SkyCaptainSkyCaptain Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    underdonk wrote: »
    Awk wrote: »
    Our world is in no tint. Color does not exist, it is perceived by the individual.
    I'm having a really hard time wrapping my head around this statement.
    Color is a fabrication of the human language, based on how our sensory organs have adapted to percieve light stimulus. Photons are either reflected or absorbed by an object. The photons that are reflected are what we percieve as color. Red is just a name we have given a specific wavelength of light. Without light and without an organ to sense light, there is no color. In the absence of light, there is only pure darkness. No photons, no color. It's not even black. Pure and absolute black is technically an absence of photons hitting the retina of our eyes.

    A hypothetical creature with no sight organs, but one that has exceptional hearing, may be able to "hear" color, based on ambient sound waves being reflected by or absorbed into the color, the same way we "see" color from photons.

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  • GihgehlsGihgehls Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    TK-42-1 wrote: »
    underdonk wrote: »
    Awk wrote: »
    Our world is in no tint. Color does not exist, it is perceived by the individual.

    I'm having a really hard time wrapping my head around this statement.

    what can really fuck you up is how do you know if what you perceive as red isnt what i percieve as blue?

    What's really gonna bake your noodle later on is would you have broken the vase if I hadn't said anything?

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  • SeptusSeptus Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Your left eye must be moving forward through space faster than your right eye.

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  • WillethWilleth Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    TK-42-1 wrote: »
    underdonk wrote: »
    Awk wrote: »
    Our world is in no tint. Color does not exist, it is perceived by the individual.

    I'm having a really hard time wrapping my head around this statement.

    what can really fuck you up is how do you know if what you perceive as red isnt what i percieve as blue?

    Man, I used to think about this so much. What if what I see as green, other people see as black, and if I could look through their eyes everything would be totally fucked?

    My conclusion was that it really doesn't matter, because you learn from a very young age what colours are what, and that's just normal to you. It's entirely possible that I see red as a completely different colour to someone else, but if we both call it red, there's no tangible difference.

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  • MetalbourneMetalbourne Tube's Favorite Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    I have a theory that your eyes make a chemical that explodes when you look at light.

    And this is why it hurts and you're blinded when you turn on a light at night. Because there's tiny explosions in the back of your eyes.

    So, expanding on this theory, I'm assuming that different levels of chemicals in your eyes will cause different sized tiny explosions, which in turn will cause your eyes to see slightly differently. Try covering one eye for half an hour and seeing if this changes the results of your tests.

    I'm trying to develop a game where you can shoot at those tiny squiggles that you see when you look up at the sky.

  • edited November 2009
    I have a theory that your eyes make a chemical that explodes when you look at light.

    And this is why it hurts and you're blinded when you turn on a light at night. Because there's tiny explosions in the back of your eyes.

    So, expanding on this theory, I'm assuming that different levels of chemicals in your eyes will cause different sized tiny explosions, which in turn will cause your eyes to see slightly differently. Try covering one eye for half an hour and seeing if this changes the results of your tests.

    I'm trying to develop a game where you can shoot at those tiny squiggles that you see when you look up at the sky.

    on a kind of related note, some of those squiggles are apparently leftover bits of tissue from when your eye was forming in utero. they just sort of never leave. others of them are bits of stuff in your tears.

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  • SeptusSeptus Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    I have definitely gained way more floaters over time, for whatever reason.

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  • AiouaAioua Novus Ordo Seclorum Lord of the ForumRegistered User regular
    edited November 2009
    SkyCaptain wrote: »
    underdonk wrote: »
    Awk wrote: »
    Our world is in no tint. Color does not exist, it is perceived by the individual.
    I'm having a really hard time wrapping my head around this statement.
    Color is a fabrication of the human language, based on how our sensory organs have adapted to percieve light stimulus. Photons are either reflected or absorbed by an object. The photons that are reflected are what we percieve as color. Red is just a name we have given a specific wavelength of light. Without light and without an organ to sense light, there is no color. In the absence of light, there is only pure darkness. No photons, no color. It's not even black. Pure and absolute black is technically an absence of photons hitting the retina of our eyes.

    A hypothetical creature with no sight organs, but one that has exceptional hearing, may be able to "hear" color, based on ambient sound waves being reflected by or absorbed into the color, the same way we "see" color from photons.

    It's even more abstract than that. We only have three color receptors that respond to specific wavelengths, so the wavlength that excites the one receptor looks red to us, so we call it red, same for blue and green. Everything else is some combination. "Yellow" light has a specific wavelength, but it just excited the red and green receptors partially. If you shoot the right amounts of red and green light into your eye it'll look yellow. (This is how a CRT works, BTW) And then there's something like "brown" where there is no single wavelength of light that will make you see it, it would be a combination of at least red, green, and blue.

    TL; DR: How we percieve color has little to do with how light actually works.

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  • L|amaL|ama Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    TK-42-1 wrote: »
    underdonk wrote: »
    Awk wrote: »
    Our world is in no tint. Color does not exist, it is perceived by the individual.

    I'm having a really hard time wrapping my head around this statement.

    what can really fuck you up is how do you know if what you perceive as red isnt what i percieve as blue?

    pow.
    there are more perceptually distinguishable shades between red and blue than there are between green and yellow, which would make red-green inversion behaviorally detectable.[1 And there are yet further asymmetries. Dark yellow is brown (qualitatively different from yellow), whereas dark blue is blue[..] Similarly, desaturated bluish-red is pink (qualitatively different from saturated bluish-red), whereas desaturated greenish-yellow is similar to saturated greenish-yellow. Again, red is a “warm” color, whereas blue is “cool” — and perhaps this is not a matter of learned associations with temperature.
    Enc wrote: »
    The world is either blurry or covered in strange moving dots. I don't know which is more accurate.

    floaters?

  • edited November 2009
    Aioua wrote: »
    SkyCaptain wrote: »
    underdonk wrote: »
    Awk wrote: »
    Our world is in no tint. Color does not exist, it is perceived by the individual.
    I'm having a really hard time wrapping my head around this statement.
    Color is a fabrication of the human language, based on how our sensory organs have adapted to percieve light stimulus. Photons are either reflected or absorbed by an object. The photons that are reflected are what we percieve as color. Red is just a name we have given a specific wavelength of light. Without light and without an organ to sense light, there is no color. In the absence of light, there is only pure darkness. No photons, no color. It's not even black. Pure and absolute black is technically an absence of photons hitting the retina of our eyes.

    A hypothetical creature with no sight organs, but one that has exceptional hearing, may be able to "hear" color, based on ambient sound waves being reflected by or absorbed into the color, the same way we "see" color from photons.

    It's even more abstract than that. We only have three color receptors that respond to specific wavelengths, so the wavlength that excites the one receptor looks red to us, so we call it red, same for blue and green. Everything else is some combination. "Yellow" light has a specific wavelength, but it just excited the red and green receptors partially. If you shoot the right amounts of red and green light into your eye it'll look yellow. (This is how a CRT works, BTW) And then there's something like "brown" where there is no single wavelength of light that will make you see it, it would be a combination of at least red, green, and blue.

    TL; DR: How we percieve color has little to do with how light actually works.

    magenta is only sort of a colour! violet and red do not actually meet in the spectrum and whowooowooaaaaaaa

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  • SkyCaptainSkyCaptain Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Aioua wrote: »
    [QUOTE=SkyCaptain;12308285Color is a fabrication of the human language, based on how our sensory organs have adapted to percieve light stimulus. Photons are either reflected or absorbed by an object. The photons that are reflected are what we percieve as color. Red is just a name we have given a specific wavelength of light. Without light and without an organ to sense light, there is no color. In the absence of light, there is only pure darkness. No photons, no color. It's not even black. Pure and absolute black is technically an absence of photons hitting the retina of our eyes.

    A hypothetical creature with no sight organs, but one that has exceptional hearing, may be able to "hear" color, based on ambient sound waves being reflected by or absorbed into the color, the same way we "see" color from photons.

    It's even more abstract than that. We only have three color receptors that respond to specific wavelengths, so the wavlength that excites the one receptor looks red to us, so we call it red, same for blue and green. Everything else is some combination. "Yellow" light has a specific wavelength, but it just excited the red and green receptors partially. If you shoot the right amounts of red and green light into your eye it'll look yellow. (This is how a CRT works, BTW) And then there's something like "brown" where there is no single wavelength of light that will make you see it, it would be a combination of at least red, green, and blue.

    TL; DR: How we percieve color has little to do with how light actually works.[/QUOTE]
    Yeah, I know. It would be interesting if we could alter our eyes to percieve even more of the light spectrum.

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  • CervetusCervetus Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Be careful you don't give yourself the ability to see radio waves or you'd go crazy.

    The libertarian response to anything is, "Sure, that works fine in practice, but it doesn't fly in theory."
  • SkyCaptainSkyCaptain Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Cervetus wrote: »
    Be careful you don't give yourself the ability to see radio waves or you'd go crazy.
    Nah, that would be awesome. I'd be able to watch HD television in my head. =)

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  • GihgehlsGihgehls Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    magenta is only sort of a colour! violet and red do not actually meet in the spectrum and whowooowooaaaaaaa
    Yeah I was just going to post and say this. Magenta is an extra-spectral color. The visible spectrum goes red orange yellow green blue indigo violet, but magenta isn't anywhere on there because it is a mix of red and violet. In other words, it is a color your brain just makes up.

    Thank goodness for the color wheel, so the spectrum can wrap around back to red.

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