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Help me become a doctor [Update Page 5]

bowenbowen Registered User regular
edited September 2010 in Help / Advice Forum
So a lot of soul searching has been going on lately and I've been very unhappy with the direction my life has been going and I think I want to get back on track. I originally went to school for pre-med but barely made it through a semester because I didn't think it was for me. Right now I work full time as the IT administrator for a local doctor's office. It's a great job and I love it. However I don't think it's for me for the rest of my life and I'm looking for something more. I'm more than willing to keep this job full time and go to school full time but I'm not sure how to accomplish that.

My degree was from ITT Tech and I'm sure this will be no help from me. If I graduate and become a doctor, awesome, great, I can wipe that part of my life and be done with it and be able to afford to wipe it and forget about it. And I won't hide the fact that a small, very small, part of me wants to go to school to be a doctor for the financial security it brings with it. And being able to take care of the past where I got fucked over because of my bad decisions in schooling.

Help me figure out how to do this. I live in Syracuse, NY and am willing to go to school in the local area. My degree is of no particular use so I'm assuming I need pre-med before I even bother.

bowen on
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Posts

  • Dr. FrenchensteinDr. Frenchenstein Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    I'm no expert but i think it takes quite a while before you start making money as a doctor. all the residency stuff, etc. i've also heard if you want to be a doctor for the money, you shouldn't be a doctor. as in, you will hate it.

  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    I'm no expert but i think it takes quite a while before you start making money as a doctor. all the residency stuff, etc. i've also heard if you want to be a doctor for the money, you shouldn't be a doctor. as in, you will hate it.

    Very small part of it.

    I enjoy the medical field from as far as I can tell, and I love learning about how to treat patients and stuff and I always ask my and my girlfriend's doctors about it. I have a feeling I could be a nephrology specialist just from that atm.

  • The Crowing OneThe Crowing One Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    I have a sister who recently dropped a pre-med, so most of this is based on her experience trying to complete the program.

    I'd start by researching programs, because doctoring certainly isn't an easy path to take. Get a copy of your transcript and compare with the requirements of programs you're considering. If you dropped out of pre-med, it may mean going back to undergrad to finish it up which can be costly and time-consuming.

    Was your undergrad from ITT Tech, or was there a different school that you dropped pre-med at? Often career departments are very happy to talk to former students about "what it takes" and what your options are. Frankly, they'd probably know more than we do.

    I'd also at least glance at becoming a RNA, or some other form of nursing, as it may be more feasible and it may be just as fulfilling. I'd rule out pre-med first, though.

    If nothing else works, you can always just buy a lab coat:
    Spoiler:

    3rddocbottom.jpg
  • DeebaserDeebaser Alpha Teemo Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    I think SUNY Syracuse has a medical school. Try applying there and go for your undergrad.

  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    I've contemplated nursing, but from my experiences with them and their job duties, that's definitely not for me.

    My undergrad was a BA from College of St Rose in Albany, with a focus in Biology. At this point it'd probably be better to start from scratch.

  • EshEsh Sunshine! Kittens! Rainbows! Smiles! Portland, ORRegistered User regular
    edited February 2010
    My step-father is a doctor. I think he's STILL paying off his med school 20 years later. It is soul crushingly difficult work to graduate from med school. Good luck with working full-time and doing that. Make absolutely sure you have the stamina for this....

    "At first he thought it might be a natural occurrence - maybe a rabbit. But upon closer inspection, it was clear a knife had been used. And rabbits don't carry knives."
  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Deebaser wrote: »
    I think SUNY Syracuse has a medical school. Try applying there and go for your undergrad.

    :^: I'm checking this out atm, it seems they offer a degree for MD.

    I'm not too concerned with the money, but the financial stability it brings is just great and I'd love to always be able to find work where I move. Don't take that as "YES A QUARTER OF A MILLION A YEAR TY!" I do have a genuine interest in being a doctor and always have. When I was a dumb teenager and starting my premed I was pretty stupid and made bad decisions and decided that it wasn't right for me at the time. And at the time it wasn't.

  • KistraKistra Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    There isn't any need to go back to undergrad if you have a degree. The *requirements* for medical school aren't all that numerous and there are post-bac programs that cover all the classes without giving you a degree.

    The bigger issue is actually getting in :P Your experience working in a doctor's office will help, but volunteering is always good and a good MCAT will help a lot too.

    Eh, medical school really isn't as hard as people make it out to be. I love it. The first two years you need to spend time studying but you have tons of free time as well. I had more free time during my first two years in medical school than during college. Third and fourth years are intense but still enjoyable (at least to me).

    Animal Crossing: City Folk Lissa in Filmore 3179-9580-0076
  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    That's what I figured was the case but I couldn't find any more information on kistra.

    My only concern is I'm not a big fan of emergency medicine and have no interest in working or doing a residency in the ER. Do I get a choice of where to do my residency?

  • FantasmaFantasma Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Becoming a doctor while working full time is very, very difficult. This from people I know, in addition, you will need to exceed others and become very good before you can start earning tons of money.

    Keep in mind that after you actually become a doctor, you would need a minimum of 1 more year of internship for a specialty, for some areas up to 7 years.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internship_(medicine)#United_States

    Hear my warnings, unbelievers. We have raised altars in this land so that we may sacrifice you to our gods. There is no hope in opposing the inevitable. Put down your arms, unbelievers, and bow before the forces of Chaos!
  • alienalien Registered User
    edited February 2010
    With all objections you have in mind it might be a tough route for you. Dentistry or Pharmacy might suit you better if I understand you motivation so far in this thread.

  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    alien wrote: »
    With all objections you have in mind it might be a tough route for you. Dentistry or Pharmacy might suit you better if I understand you motivation so far in this thread.

    In terms of ER, I just don't like the "MAKE DECISIONS RIGHT NOW OR SOMEONE DIES" part of it. Part of the reason I really liked learning about nephrology. I was originally going to be a doctor of genetics. So even then the ER type medicine didn't really interest me -- mostly surgery and the types of shit that shows up in an ER is something I don't really like or have any interest in.

    I have no problem with blood, if that's what people are basing this off of, it's just one of those "meh" type feelings I get from the general idea of ER medicine. I could probably handle it though, if need be.

    Even a GP would be fine for me, working towards a specialty in the future. Everyone in my family asks me for medical advice even though I'm not a doctor just because of what I pick up working here and reading so, I really do have the interest in doctoring I think.

  • KistraKistra Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    During third and fourth year you will need to do 6 and 8 week long required rotations in a variety of medical specialties. These vary slightly depending on school but they commonly include: internal medicine inpatient and out, surgery inpatient and out, family med, peds, psych, OB-gyn and ER. ER tends to be included because it is a good place to practice histories and physicals.

    When you apply to residency you apply to a specific medical specialty. In many residencies one of your services will be covering the ER when they call for consults in your specialty. But again, how much of that you need to do is dependent on the individual residency.

    On this page (down at the bottom) is a list of all the different medical specialties that one can apply to when graduating medical school: https://services.aamc.org/eras/erasstats/par/

    The rest of the aamc website will be helpful to you as well. AMCAS is on there which is the centralized medical school admission process and there is a lot of information about the MCAT as well. There are also (or used to be) some tools to help you pick a specialty.

    Animal Crossing: City Folk Lissa in Filmore 3179-9580-0076
  • KistraKistra Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Okay, since there seems to be some confusion about how the process works:

    Medical school - 4 years
    generally ~ 2 years of mostly lecture with slowly increasing patient contact
    generally ~ 2 years of primarily patient contact with weekly lectures and lots of informal teaching during rounds
    you take the first two parts of your licensing exam after 2nd year and after 3rd year

    Residency - 3-5 years depending on the specialty
    you apply to about 10 programs and then a computer "Matches" you (hopefully) with one of those programs
    generally you apply to all of those programs in a single medical specialty, so you get to make a list of places you are willing to go, but you don't have a choice as to which of those places you go, the Match is a legally binding contract, but starting next year the residency programs actually have to show you the contract you are agreeing to before you rank their program
    during this time you are a doctor, but with some oversight. You get paid ~50k a year and subsidized grants don't start accruing interest
    you take the third part of your general licensing exam after the first year of residency and you take your specialty licensing exam at the end of your residency

    Fellowship - 1-3 years
    optional, but hard to get a job in some medical sub specialties without one
    you are a doctor at this point, but have the time and are in a program to do an indepth study of a medical subspecialty. you are paid and your loans are accruing interest, some of them you have to start paying back and some of them you don't.

    Animal Crossing: City Folk Lissa in Filmore 3179-9580-0076
  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    My only concern is I don't want to be assigned to something like obstetrics or colon surgery(wut?). That would seriously be a ego killer and make me not interested in being a doctor at all. But I also have no problem being a GP/family doctor -- I'd probably end up applying for the loan that requires me being a GP for a few years anyways.

    Edit: Also I'm getting huge ranges on loan amounts, what is the average cost of medical school?

    It looks like being a state resident for my whole life is going to work out in my favor for attending SUNY for a medical degree if I can basically get in for $10,000 a semester, as opposed to $25,000. (Again, don't misread that, I made a mistake of not knowing my school loans before going into ITT and that bit me in the ass so fast).

  • FantasmaFantasma Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    bowen wrote: »
    My only concern is I don't want to be assigned to something like obstetrics or colon surgery(wut?).

    A doctor is a doctor, and doctors do have to go down to the dirt, no matter if they like it or not. Most doctors I know have two jobs, and the things they have to do for a living sometimes sound surreal to me, of course, you have to use gloves and protective clothing, specially if you are in the area of surgery removing part of a colon (which must be washed during the procedure).

    Sorry for the colourful details.

    Hear my warnings, unbelievers. We have raised altars in this land so that we may sacrifice you to our gods. There is no hope in opposing the inevitable. Put down your arms, unbelievers, and bow before the forces of Chaos!
  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    I wasn't aware it was even a fellowship, seems a bit too highly specialized.

  • VeritasVRVeritasVR Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Doctor :: Olympian

    The future Olympian begins their career at a young age by being above average or exceptional in their sport. They cultivate this by training with great coaches and/or excellent facilities. Typically, they must be the best in their region which takes a great deal of time, money, and perserverance. Being an Olympian is not for everyone; in fact only a few actually make it. After the Olympics, many do not go pro in their sport and are still in financial limbo, even if they attain prestige with an Olympic medal.

    CoH_infantry.jpg
    Let 'em eat fucking pineapples!
  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    VeritasVR wrote: »
    Doctor :: Olympian

    The future Olympian begins their career at a young age by being above average or exceptional in their sport. They cultivate this by training with great coaches and/or excellent facilities. Typically, they must be the best in their region which takes a great deal of time, money, and perserverance. Being an Olympian is not for everyone; in fact only a few actually make it. After the Olympics, many do not go pro in their sport and are still in financial limbo, even if they attain prestige with an Olympic medal.

    That is not at all a concern for me, I believe that this is what I'm interested in doing. Thankfully, in this case, medicine is one of the few fields where loan forgiveness is practiced. So while financial limbo is an utmost concern for Olympians or doctors, it's not really that big of a deal. I just highlighted my concern with my past experiences and looked for guidance. Yes, yes, I know, being a doctor is not about the money and it's not, but you'd have to be a silly goose to not consider financial ramifications of attending school again and with my experience with schools it's something I need to pay attention with.

  • Evil_ReaverEvil_Reaver Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Fantasma wrote: »
    Becoming a doctor while working full time is very, very difficult.

    I have nothing to back this up with, but I would assume that you're not even allowed to work through medical school at most universities.

    I mean, I'm working full-time through law school and I want to kill myself.

    My advice would be to quit your job and go to school full-time so you can focus your attention on your studies.

    XBL: Agitated Wombat | 3DS: 2363-7048-2527
  • FantasmaFantasma Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Fantasma wrote: »
    Becoming a doctor while working full time is very, very difficult.

    I have nothing to back this up with, but I would assume that you're not even allowed to work through medical school at most universities.

    I mean, I'm working full-time through law school and I want to kill myself.

    My advice would be to quit your job and go to school full-time so you can focus your attention on your studies.

    My girlfriend is getting ready to take a long exam to apply and become a Surgeon, if she is accepted, she is required to quit her current job and devote 4 years of her life to an internship.

    Hear my warnings, unbelievers. We have raised altars in this land so that we may sacrifice you to our gods. There is no hope in opposing the inevitable. Put down your arms, unbelievers, and bow before the forces of Chaos!
  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Fantasma wrote: »
    Becoming a doctor while working full time is very, very difficult.

    I have nothing to back this up with, but I would assume that you're not even allowed to work through medical school at most universities.

    I mean, I'm working full-time through law school and I want to kill myself.

    My advice would be to quit your job and go to school full-time so you can focus your attention on your studies.

    I would assume I could get medical school loans to cover my apartment, electric, food, gas, car payments, outstanding debt? I can't dorm.

  • Evil_ReaverEvil_Reaver Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    bowen wrote: »
    Fantasma wrote: »
    Becoming a doctor while working full time is very, very difficult.

    I have nothing to back this up with, but I would assume that you're not even allowed to work through medical school at most universities.

    I mean, I'm working full-time through law school and I want to kill myself.

    My advice would be to quit your job and go to school full-time so you can focus your attention on your studies.

    I would assume I could get medical school loans to cover my apartment, electric, food, gas, car payments, outstanding debt? I can't dorm.

    You can use loans to pay for anything you want while you're in school - that's the entire point of taking out loans. Having said that, taking out a loan to make car payments (a loan) and debt (a loan) is not a good idea, IMO.

    And yes, I'm going to take my own advice starting in the fall. Working full-time through professional school is just about the worst experience in the world. I'm going to take out loans and go in to significant debt, but the plus side is that I'll finish school faster and hopefully get a job to pay off said debt.

    XBL: Agitated Wombat | 3DS: 2363-7048-2527
  • DogDog Registered User, Administrator, Vanilla Staff admin
    edited February 2010
    Can I be the first person to say for you to not do this right now?

    You recently made a post about how to consolidate a large amount of debt, and this isn't your first topic on the subject either and now you want to tack on medical school expenses as well? You're already in a hole, and if you don't follow through with years of hard work the hole is going to be even bigger than what it is now. And if you do follow through, it will be even more years still until everything (including your existing debt) is paid off.

    I understand the urge to change directions, but I really think it is something you should keep as a goal once your current fiscal situation has resolved itself, and if the urge is still there when that is done you can move forward.

  • KistraKistra Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    bowen wrote: »
    My only concern is I don't want to be assigned to something like obstetrics or colon surgery(wut?). That would seriously be a ego killer and make me not interested in being a doctor at all. But I also have no problem being a GP/family doctor -- I'd probably end up applying for the loan that requires me being a GP for a few years anyways.

    Edit: Also I'm getting huge ranges on loan amounts, what is the average cost of medical school?

    It looks like being a state resident for my whole life is going to work out in my favor for attending SUNY for a medical degree if I can basically get in for $10,000 a semester, as opposed to $25,000. (Again, don't misread that, I made a mistake of not knowing my school loans before going into ITT and that bit me in the ass so fast).

    What do you mean by assigned? Do you mean during your medical school rotations? Or do you mean for residency?

    You are going to have to rotate through OB-gyn and surgery during your third year of medical school. If learning about medical things that aren't what you want to do for the rest of your life is a blow to your ego, don't go to medical school. As a 3rd year medical student you will be doing scut work and holding retractors and being ordered out of patients rooms and have patients refuse to let you touch them. If you can't handle that with humility you are going to have a hard time.

    You can only be matched with residencies that are on your rank list. If you don't want to do OBgyn, don't apply to OBgyn residencies...o_O The vast majority of people have all the residencies on the match list in one specialty. The few that I knew that didn't were trying to get into competitive combined residencies, so they also listed non-combined residencies in one of the specialties (ie someone trying to get into med/peds would also list a few internal med residencies or a few peds residencies).

    Fellowships are extremely specialized and most people going through them end up specializing in something even smaller than the broad topic of their fellowship.

    You can get loans for med school and use them for whatever you want. The cost of each medical school varies dramatically and the official reported numbers for debt for graduating students in generally combined debt from both undergrad and med school (don't ask me why, that is just what they report). I think the national average for the class graduating in 2009 was 300k.

    Also, you will need to submit your parents information on your FAFSA even if you are 35, married and are in the armed forces. A large portion of the student loans for med school come from a different source than the general undergraduate loans and they require parental information no matter what.

    Animal Crossing: City Folk Lissa in Filmore 3179-9580-0076
  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Ah then I was misunderstanding how that little residency rank list worked, it look as if you didn't get a match you basically had to take something you may not have wanted to do.

    As for my existing debt, they'll exist for some time, and if I'm going to do this I don't want to start med school when I'm 45.

  • Casual EddyCasual Eddy Fighting the War on String Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    If you're interested in the security of the medical field you might want to consider being a 'sorta doctor' like a physicians assistant. This requires less schooling and work than a full doctor, but it will put you in a good position to be a doctor later on in life. PAs can write prescriptions, and they generally handle the more basic duties of medicine. I believe their salaries tend to be in the healthy 5 figure range.

    PAs are also a growing field as they tend to be cheaper to keep around than doctors.

    75trafim7bi2.png
  • KistraKistra Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    If you don't match there is a scramble. But you aren't going to get into a residency in a specialty that you haven't been preparing for. Generally during fourth year you do some electives in the specialty you are going to apply for and also get your letters of recommendation from people in that specialty. If you did two Internal medicine electives and all of your letters of recommendation are from IM doctors, you are not going to get into an OB-gyn residency during scramble.

    You will get much better grades though if you really are interested in every rotation. You will get bad grades on your rotation if you can't fake interest. You will likely fail your rotation if you straight up tell your attending that it would be a blow to your ego to do their job. (especially if you say that to a colon surgeon since GI fellowships are considered hard to get)

    Animal Crossing: City Folk Lissa in Filmore 3179-9580-0076
  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Just for clarification, I'm not put off by them or have no interest. It's just it's not something I see myself or want to be doing with my life. Just like if I were a programmer I'd have no interest in assembly if I really wanted to be a GUI guy.

    But the medical field at large interests me and I love learning the things I have been able to so far. I see no reason why I wouldn't enjoy it immensely. I guess blow to my ego was the wrong choice of words, I assumed the scramble basically said "fuck it you have to take this." But if you understand where I'm coming from it'd be mildly depressing to be stuck with pediatrics if you were studying and wanted to be a plastic surgeon or something -- not necessarily a 'blow to my ego' that was probably the wrong choice of words on my part.

  • darkmayodarkmayo Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    bowen wrote: »
    Just for clarification, I'm not put off by them or have no interest. It's just it's not something I see myself or want to be doing with my life. Just like if I were a programmer I'd have no interest in assembly if I really wanted to be a GUI guy.

    But the medical field at large interests me and I love learning the things I have been able to so far. I see no reason why I wouldn't enjoy it immensely. I guess blow to my ego was the wrong choice of words, I assumed the scramble basically said "fuck it you have to take this." But if you understand where I'm coming from it'd be mildly depressing to be stuck with pediatrics if you were studying and wanted to be a plastic surgeon or something -- not necessarily a 'blow to my ego' that was probably the wrong choice of words on my part.

    My girlfriend is currently a first year at UofC (university of calgary) , she is 33 and doesnt have a science background, it took her a few attempts but she eventually got in.

    UofC is an accelerated course, 3 years compared to 4 for other med schools and its rough, alot of work and a lot of studying even if it was a 4 year I dont think one could work during it. So you pretty much will have to rely on student loans etc.

    You learn everything, and when you start clerkship 3rd year, you will be rotated through everything, including stuff you may never want to do. After that is your residency which depending on what you want and if you are going to go into a speciality is another few years (tho you do get paid and are a "doctor" at this point)

    Not sure how old you are but it might be a good idea to clear off some debt and work on some other things to make your application to medschool look more attractive. Like I said my GF is 33 and she isnt the oldest first year by a long shot. So you have time.

  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    darkmayo wrote: »
    Not sure how old you are but it might be a good idea to clear off some debt and work on some other things to make your application to medschool look more attractive. Like I said my GF is 33 and she isnt the oldest first year by a long shot. So you have time.

    I've been feeling unfulfilled by my current job. Plus I am 98% positive that I want to be a doctor.

  • DoctorArchDoctorArch Curmudgeon Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Fantasma wrote: »
    Becoming a doctor while working full time is very, very difficult.

    I have nothing to back this up with, but I would assume that you're not even allowed to work through medical school at most universities.

    I mean, I'm working full-time through law school and I want to kill myself.

    My advice would be to quit your job and go to school full-time so you can focus your attention on your studies.

    Oh God, I am so, so sorry. D:

    steam_sig.png
  • kaliyamakaliyama Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Do you have any aptitude for o-chem or physics? If itt is accredited as a bs the most expedient route will be doing a post-bac program, but it will be wasted time and money if you can't handle it.
    Odds are you will need 1-3 years of remedial education before the MCAT.

    fwKS7.png?1
  • WalterWalter Registered User
    edited February 2010
    I know a few people in my class that have part time jobs working Saturdays. You definitely couldn't work full time (at least not at my program) or any job without super flexible hours. Our schedule varies so much that I wouldn't be able to block off any time except weekends.

    Also, you should really check and make sure you aren't required to have a regionally accredited bachelors. I am almost certain that is a requirement.

    We do have a 30 year old in our class. I have a friend at Stanford who got in at 40 (already had his PhD though).

  • LeCausticLeCaustic Registered User
    edited February 2010
    Let's not forget that medicine is currently going through a rehauling of sorts. It's not going to be the same as it used to.

    I recommend www.studentdoctor.net/ and starting there. You'll hear it from everyone; premeds, med students, residents, attendings, physicians, etc etc. It's not easy and it certainly is NOT pretty. Also, your current choice in specialty may change completely when you actually do clinical rotations. I've heard stories of people doing complete 180s and changing their specialty choice while doing clinical rotations. Heard about people in 5th year of residency in neurology and completely breaking down and going into pediatrics.

    Also, who in their right mind would want to work while in Medical School? I'm in a masters program working full time and I regret the decision and I cannot even begin to imagine people doing it in Med School (Mind you, I'm not in a ho-dunk masters either).

    Spoiler:
  • Evil_ReaverEvil_Reaver Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Archgarth wrote: »
    Fantasma wrote: »
    Becoming a doctor while working full time is very, very difficult.

    I have nothing to back this up with, but I would assume that you're not even allowed to work through medical school at most universities.

    I mean, I'm working full-time through law school and I want to kill myself.

    My advice would be to quit your job and go to school full-time so you can focus your attention on your studies.

    Oh God, I am so, so sorry. D:

    More like
    [B][SIZE="7"][COLOR="Red"]D:[/COLOR][/SIZE][/B]
    

    I already worked for the university and full-time staff get a nice break on tuition. In my eagerness to go back to school, I failed to consider that:

    1. Professional school is not the same as undergrad.

    2. On top of the 40 hours a week I already work, I'd be adding 9 hours of classes, plus another 18-27 hours of studying a week.

    I really wish I could go back in time and punch myself in the face because working full-time and going to law school was the worst decision I could have made.

    Fortunately, I'm 90-97% sure I'm going to be able to quit my job this summer and go to school full-time on loans while my wife functions as the breadwinner until I graduate.

    And to relate it back to the OP, there's no way you'd be able to work full-time through medical school. Drop this idea now and start looking in to loans.

    XBL: Agitated Wombat | 3DS: 2363-7048-2527
  • kaliyamakaliyama Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    Archgarth wrote: »
    Fantasma wrote: »
    Becoming a doctor while working full time is very, very difficult.

    I have nothing to back this up with, but I would assume that you're not even allowed to work through medical school at most universities.

    I mean, I'm working full-time through law school and I want to kill myself.

    My advice would be to quit your job and go to school full-time so you can focus your attention on your studies.

    Oh God, I am so, so sorry. D:

    More like
    [B][SIZE="7"][COLOR="Red"]D:[/COLOR][/SIZE][/B]
    

    I already worked for the university and full-time staff get a nice break on tuition. In my eagerness to go back to school, I failed to consider that:

    1. Professional school is not the same as undergrad.

    2. On top of the 40 hours a week I already work, I'd be adding 9 hours of classes, plus another 18-27 hours of studying a week.

    I really wish I could go back in time and punch myself in the face because working full-time and going to law school was the worst decision I could have made.

    Fortunately, I'm 90-97% sure I'm going to be able to quit my job this summer and go to school full-time on loans while my wife functions as the breadwinner until I graduate.

    And to relate it back to the OP, there's no way you'd be able to work full-time through medical school. Drop this idea now and start looking in to loans.

    Just pull old outlines and update them periodically. Don't worry about class. I was order of the coif with ~50% attendance avg. In a weird confluence of topicality, there was an ER doctor who was also a full time law student in my section and he didn't bother doing much of anything besides go save lives and do most of the reading and he was fine.

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  • Evil_ReaverEvil_Reaver Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    kaliyama wrote: »
    Spoiler:

    Just pull old outlines and update them periodically. Don't worry about class. I was order of the coif with ~50% attendance avg. In a weird confluence of topicality, there was an ER doctor who was also a full time law student in my section and he didn't bother doing much of anything besides go save lives and do most of the reading and he was fine.

    Was this guy's name Chuck Norris?

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  • LeCausticLeCaustic Registered User
    edited February 2010
    Archgarth wrote: »
    Fantasma wrote: »
    Becoming a doctor while working full time is very, very difficult.

    I have nothing to back this up with, but I would assume that you're not even allowed to work through medical school at most universities.

    I mean, I'm working full-time through law school and I want to kill myself.

    My advice would be to quit your job and go to school full-time so you can focus your attention on your studies.

    Oh God, I am so, so sorry. D:

    More like
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    I already worked for the university and full-time staff get a nice break on tuition. In my eagerness to go back to school, I failed to consider that:

    1. Professional school is not the same as undergrad.

    2. On top of the 40 hours a week I already work, I'd be adding 9 hours of classes, plus another 18-27 hours of studying a week.

    I really wish I could go back in time and punch myself in the face because working full-time and going to law school was the worst decision I could have made.

    Fortunately, I'm 90-97% sure I'm going to be able to quit my job this summer and go to school full-time on loans while my wife functions as the breadwinner until I graduate.

    And to relate it back to the OP, there's no way you'd be able to work full-time through medical school. Drop this idea now and start looking in to loans.

    I wish I could do the same right now

    Spoiler:
  • pardzhpardzh Registered User regular
    edited February 2010
    What was your BA like? I'm unsure of what a "focus in Biology" really means.

    I'm just wondering because as a Biology/Chem major myself I see Pre-Med hopefuls dropping like flies once they come up on Organic II / Biochem. I mean, be sure you got the chops for the Pre-Med stuff first, right?

    Again, I dunno how you feel about the undergrad stuff, but that's just my personal observation.

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