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Lazy Mans guide for better lunches...help.

Mostlyjoe13Mostlyjoe13 SemiaquaticSuburban Subtropical Wasteland aka. FloridaRegistered User regular
edited June 2010 in Help / Advice Forum
I have to stop eating out. Full stop.

My current self-lunch making skills are sandwiches. I'm bloody tired of them. So to you H/A I turn for advice. What are some healthy (but reasonable) easy to make lunches I can create the night before work? I'm seeking something that can be whipped up in 15 minutes or less and holds up in a cooler for a few hours during the day.

I'm trying to amend my diet, but if I don't eat enough I get low blood sugar related shakes. ie. Family history of hypogycemia. I'm pretty good at coasting, but I'm looking for something that I can eat maybe twice in a day? Early/late mini-lunches. Are there preprepared options? I have SuperTarget/Walmart/Publix in reach. I'm looking for meals, snacks, and liquid refreshment options.

This is both for my health and my pocketbook. Thank you for any advice.

Mostlyjoe13 on
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PSN ID - Mostlyjoe Steam ID -electricplatypus
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Posts

  • DelzhandDelzhand motivated battle programmerRegistered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Make 1 cup of rice
    add a can of tuna
    add a can of rinsed black beans

    BAM

    Season as desired, but it's pretty good unseasoned, too.

    jk0Btsj.png
  • ChanusChanus Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
  • MalkorMalkor Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Hummus

    Serve with whatever is nearby.

    14271f3c-c765-4e74-92b1-49d7612675f2.jpg
  • EshEsh Tending bar. FFXIV. Spending too much money eating out. That's about it. Portland, ORRegistered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Delzhand wrote: »
    Make 1 cup of rice
    add a can of tuna
    add a can of rinsed black beans

    BAM

    Season as desired, but it's pretty good unseasoned, too.

    That sounds good, and it's probably something like two portions, right?

    "At first he thought it might be a natural occurrence - maybe a rabbit. But upon closer inspection, it was clear a knife had been used. And rabbits don't carry knives."

    Final Fantasy XIV:Lilja Sunblade
  • SpacemilkSpacemilk Registered User
    edited June 2010
    • Anything with pasta, for the most part! Spaghetti (or any noodle) + sauce (red or white) + hamburger in the sauce if you like. The nice thing about this is that you can prepare in bulk and make enough for 3-5 meals throughout the week.
    • Tuna salad. Can also bulk prepare!
    • Grill up some hamburger + taco seasoning, cut up some tomato/onion the night before, grab some shredded cheese and lettuce and taco shells, and voila! You could have burritos if you add beans, taco salad, tacos, whatever. Easy quick prep.
    • Cans of soup! Zero prep the night before. A LOT of soup is high in sodium, but Campbell's has recently put out some low sodium varieties - think they are in chicken broth and chicken noodle. I just had one today, it is not bad at all.
    • Obviously, frozen lunches. You can do it full-dinner style, or get pot pies, mini pizzas, frozen burritos/chimichangas... whatever your heart desires. You can get super healthy or super unhealthy. Ranges from $2-3 a pop in my experience.

    If you are truly looking to cook your own, rather than buy cans of soup or frozen lunches, try googling "15 minute dinners" or "30 minute dinners" and follow some of the excellent recipes. Add in the word "easy" to your google search if your cooking fu is not high.

    From personal experience, I choose one main dish - be it cans of soup, frozen lunches (the healthy variety) - and "accessorize" by adding fruit/veggies (apples, oranges, grapes, cherries, carrots, strawberries - takes half a sec to throw stuff into a ziploc) and a snack-size bag of chips. The end result is a VERY healthy meal. Also it's a meal that I can snack out throughout the day if I feel like it.

  • DragonPupDragonPup Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    I've also been doing a whole lot less take out myself and trying to eat better. I posted this in another thread, but here's a simple DIY Grilled Chicken Caeser Salad:

    5 oz Romaine Lettuce
    3-4 oz of chicken breast grilled in a foreman grill for about 5 minutes (make sure to cut out the fat before hand)
    1 tablespoon of shredded lowfat/fat free mozzarella cheese
    Couple of croutons.
    Kraft Lite Catalina dressing

    You can make 2 of these in under 10 minutes, and one keeps me full for hours. If you're on WeightWatchers, it is only 5 or 6 points, too.

    "I was there, I was there, the day Horus slew the Emperor." -Cpt Garviel Loken

    Currently painting: Slowly [flickr]
  • Mostlyjoe13Mostlyjoe13 Semiaquatic Suburban Subtropical Wasteland aka. FloridaRegistered User regular
    edited June 2010
    No major restrictions:

    Mildly Lactose Intolerance, and hardwood nut oils go through me like Drain-O.

    I can drink Lactaid though.

    steam_sig.png
    PSN ID - Mostlyjoe Steam ID -electricplatypus
  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Super Moderator, Moderator mod
    edited June 2010
    Tortillas are generally more versatile than sandwich bread, You can make wraps out of tons of stuff. If you make a rice dish, you can wrap it up and make a little burrito for you for lunch. You can also throw all sorts of shit in wraps and have it hold up better. Choose one or two nights to spend longer cooking and then utilize the leftovers in various ways. Tuna salad, black beans and rice, chicken salad, Cooked chicken breasts, stuff like that will take slightly longer to make, but you'll have good shit for later.


    My favorite wraps:
    Spoiler:

    lma_iphone_icon.pngAA_iphone_icon.pngtwittersolid.pngtumbrsolid.png
  • CauldCauld Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Do you have a microwave available at work?

  • UsagiUsagi Feminazgul ~*special snowflake*~Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    I really like this black bean and tomato quinoa salad, I make all the pieces one evening and then just dish it up in the morning. It's even delicious at room temperature.

    Other things I'll do is buffalo or ground turkey chili over brown rice; chicken stir fry over brown rice; miso marinated pork with snow peas over brown rice; etc.

    The biggest time-saver I find is making big batches of brown rice/bulghur wheat/quinoa over the weekend and then freezing them (while they're still warm!) into portions. Defrost one the night before, or use it as an edible icepack in your lunch and almost all of the texture is preserved for lunch.

    Jormungandr? Damn near killed 'er!
  • EggyToastEggyToast Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    If you have a microwave, you might want to look into some frozen meals. They're usually very cheap -- Lean Cuisines are around $2.50 -- and there's a wide enough variety of meals that you won't get too bored.

    || Flickr — || PSN: EggyToast
  • EshEsh Tending bar. FFXIV. Spending too much money eating out. That's about it. Portland, ORRegistered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Speaking of tuna, can anyone recommend the best of the affordable brands? I know I want it packed in water, but that's about it...

    "At first he thought it might be a natural occurrence - maybe a rabbit. But upon closer inspection, it was clear a knife had been used. And rabbits don't carry knives."

    Final Fantasy XIV:Lilja Sunblade
  • krushkrush Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    tabbouleh, which is a fairly easy to make middle eastern salad

    Shish kufta, preferrably made with ground lamb, but ground beef is an ok substitute (ground turkey tastes like grilled ass in this recipe)

    Kao Soi (Thai curry noodles) is good too, I make some at night, put it in a tupperware container and reheat at the office.

    Dum Aloo (Indian curry potatoes) and naan is pretty good for lunch too.

  • El MuchoEl Mucho Colbchella God damn it!Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    There are some decent recipes on this website that involve canned tuna and salmon.

    http://www.cloverleaf.ca/en/recipes/tag/take5/

    A sandwich is a sandwich, but a manwich is a mess.
  • illigillig Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    do you cook dinner at home? i find the best way to consistently have something for lunch is to make more than you will eat for dinner and pack the rest in a tupperware container... nuke at work and enjoy

    also, fruit, such as bananas, apples, pears, grapes, etc. are great snacks at work and add great variety throughout the day... i would suggest nuts but apparently they're not great for you :D... oh, and my recommendation is to avoid more difficult to eat fruit due to the mess... oranges that must be peeled, kiwis, etc. are not good... and cherries and pomegranate stain like FOREVER

  • WildSpoonWildSpoon Registered User
    edited June 2010
    I pretty much live the lunch life you are seeking. I mix things up now and then to save my sanity but some quick things that come to mind are:

    Campbells "soup at hand" (diff flavours) + mini flavoured tuna can (i use cloverleaf, lemon pepper is my fav)

    Mini can of mini ravioli's.

    same mini tuna can but i bring a whole wheat wrap in and make a tuna wrap on the spot. bring extra fixings to taste (small bit of shredded cheese, bit of lettuce.. whatever...)

    some frozen meals these days are actually pretty descent and some have healthy choices. They honestly are not that bad and i suggest taking a look down the frozen aisle at the grocery store. Everything from pastas to mini pizza type things are available.

    for accessories i mix it up but sometimes i buy puddings, fruit cups, and the like. my latest fav is Dole pear chunks in a light syrup.

    I also will most times buy like one box of Triscuits or "cracker" of some kind, then when i get home ill divide said box up into a few different amounts in zip lock bags, ready to grab the morning i head out.

    Another tip is buy a box of cereal bars / fruit bars. they come in 6-8 per box, perfect for a "weeks worth" of breakfast items... ill eat those at like 9amish.


    Idk, im constantly looking for new things to take as well, I also will make big batches of spaghetti / random pasta with a simple meat / red sauce, can get 3 days of lunches and suppers outa that baby!

    Good luck, while the grocery bill goes up, i found i saved hella money not going out to eat all the time, and the extra awareness of what you are eating just by proxy of doing this will help with health related choices as well (it did me anyway).

    "Programming today is a race between software engineers striving to build bigger and better idiot-proof programs, and the Universe trying to produce bigger and better idiots. So far, the Universe is winning."
    Rich Cook.

    PSN ID - WildSpoon
  • DelzhandDelzhand motivated battle programmerRegistered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Esh wrote: »
    Delzhand wrote: »
    Make 1 cup of rice
    add a can of tuna
    add a can of rinsed black beans

    BAM

    Season as desired, but it's pretty good unseasoned, too.

    That sounds good, and it's probably something like two portions, right?

    3 or 4, depending on how much you eat at a sitting.

    (I'm eating some right now)

    jk0Btsj.png
  • DiscoZombieDiscoZombie Registered User
    edited June 2010
    people who bring/make lunch: any concept of how much you spend a day on lunch? Whenever I think about whether I should bother making lunch, the savings just don't seem drastic enough for it to be worth the effort. I probably spend about $6.50 eating lunch out each day. Bringing a frozen meal would probably be about $3-4. Something like a sandwich and a snack would probably be like $2.50. So I guess if I could save $4 a day on lunch, 5 days a week, 52 weeks a year, that's like a thousand dollars a year. Not a tiny number, but not enough to get my ass to the grocery store a couple days a week, in the kitchen every morning, etc.

  • CiriraCirira Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    I tried an experiment last week. I spent 10 dollars on lunch meat + bread for sandwhiches. I had enough food for about 8 sandwhiches so it almost lasted me 2 weeks. I routinely spent 6-10 dollars when I eat out for lunch.

    The food I fix is usually MUCH healthier on top of cheaper. If I make the food I spend about 8-15 dollars a week, whereas when I eat out it's 30-50 dollars a week. Saving a minimum of 20 dollars a week doesn't seem like much but that 1k can go a long ways.

  • EshEsh Tending bar. FFXIV. Spending too much money eating out. That's about it. Portland, ORRegistered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Delzhand wrote: »
    Esh wrote: »
    Delzhand wrote: »
    Make 1 cup of rice
    add a can of tuna
    add a can of rinsed black beans

    BAM

    Season as desired, but it's pretty good unseasoned, too.

    That sounds good, and it's probably something like two portions, right?

    3 or 4, depending on how much you eat at a sitting.

    (I'm eating some right now)

    I'm trying to lighten up my diet a bit but still remain healthy. I'm fairly thin (5'10 / 165) but I've developed the beginnings of a spare tire I'd like to get rid of. Honestly, I could eat all that in one sitting easy, but I'm trying to tone it down a little.

    "At first he thought it might be a natural occurrence - maybe a rabbit. But upon closer inspection, it was clear a knife had been used. And rabbits don't carry knives."

    Final Fantasy XIV:Lilja Sunblade
  • strebaliciousstrebalicious Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    I've been making some salads to take to work for the past few weeks. Just some lettuce, those little matchstick carrot things, chopped up red onions, yellow/orange/red peppers, blueberries, cherry tomatoes. Mix in a small glob of ranch dressing, sprinkle some parmesean cheese over the top, drop a couple of bread and butter pickle slices on the top. Take some croutons on the side to put on later at work. Takes me about 10 minutes to make at home the night before.

    camo_sig2.png
  • Aurora BorealisAurora Borealis Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    I have the same hypoglycemic shakey problem. Few things stop them in the tracks for me better than a well-timed hard boiled egg.

  • RaneadosRaneados Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    you dig sandwiches! Well you used to!

    you can seriously cut out a huge portion of salt and even save some money by making your own bread

    and it has the plus side of being so goddamn delicious

    so good

    http://www.thesimpledollar.com/2007/11/04/homemade-bread-cheap-delicious-healthy-and-easier-than-you-think/

    Dubh wrote: »
    Rane is the future of ancient greek tradition
  • mrt144mrt144 King of the Numbernames Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Delzhand wrote: »
    Make 1 cup of rice
    add a can of tuna
    add a can of rinsed black beans

    BAM

    Season as desired, but it's pretty good unseasoned, too.

    This sounds absolutely abysmal both in taste and effort.

  • RaneadosRaneados Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    mrt144 wrote: »
    Delzhand wrote: »
    Make 1 cup of rice
    add a can of tuna
    add a can of rinsed black beans

    BAM

    Season as desired, but it's pretty good unseasoned, too.

    This sounds absolutely abysmal both in taste and effort.

    it's actually pretty good for a basic meal

    and what is "abysmal effort"?

    like...1) it's too much effort for what you get?
    2) or is it not enough effort?


    because 1) no it's not
    2) that's the point

    Dubh wrote: »
    Rane is the future of ancient greek tradition
  • FeatherBladeFeatherBlade Registered User
    edited June 2010
    The less prepared food is, generally speaking, the cheaper it is.

    Here's a recipe I threw together
    1 cup pinto beans (dry)
    1 cup red beans (dry)
    1 cup pearled barley
    1 cup rice
    1/2 - 1 cup dried currants
    chicken broth
    creole seasoning

    Soak the beans overnight then boil them for an hour (as directed on the back of the package). Cook the rice and barley together (I used a rice cooker - one cooking cycle is enough). Mix the beans and rice together with a splash of chicken broth and creole seasoning to taste. Mix in currants.

    Divide into containers and store in the freezer. Can be warmed up or eaten cold.

    A bag of pearled barley is $.50 for a 1 lb bag. The rice and means are similarly priced. Barley and pinto beans measure to about 2 cups per pound, red beans are around 2.5 cups per pound. Currants are ... $3-5 per box, and you'll probably use about half a box.

    So... the price for the dry ingredients for the above recipe works out to approximately $3. The amounts of broth and spice are negligible, in relation to the amounts in which you have to purchase them, but we'll be generous and say that they add $.50 to the cost of the recipe.

    A reasonable serving size for this dish is around 1 cup. The recipe makes around 7-10 servings. 7 servings at $3.50 is $.50 per serving.

    This isn't really a full meal though, so I usually have it with yogurt ($.50 per serving) and chicken breast cooked in olive oil and spices, or italian dressing (also very cheap to prepare - maybe $1 per serving).

    So, I'm spending about $2 per meal.

    The best part is, all I have to do is cook once on each weekend, put the food in portion-sized containers, and just pull them out of the fridge or freezer right before I leave for work.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • CognisseurCognisseur Registered User
    edited June 2010
    I recommend you cook some stuff that lasts for several batches. Here's an example. Today, I cooked two things simultaneously, pumpkin bread and cream of broccoli soup. In about 1.5 hours, I cooked it all and cleaned up the kitchen. I have like 6-8 bowls of soup now, and two giant loaves of delicious moist pumpkin bread.

    If you're too lazy for that much of a time commitment, I recommend slow-cooker stuff. I make amazing pulled pork sandwiches and it only takes like 10 minutes of prep time total. Then you have 8 pulled pork sandwiches that reheat well. Chili might take 20 min prep time but again, makes tons of chili.

  • mrt144mrt144 King of the Numbernames Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Raneados wrote: »
    mrt144 wrote: »
    Delzhand wrote: »
    Make 1 cup of rice
    add a can of tuna
    add a can of rinsed black beans

    BAM

    Season as desired, but it's pretty good unseasoned, too.

    This sounds absolutely abysmal both in taste and effort.

    it's actually pretty good for a basic meal

    and what is "abysmal effort"?

    like...1) it's too much effort for what you get?
    2) or is it not enough effort?


    because 1) no it's not
    2) that's the point

    If you hate food, then sure, you could eat this. There is no effort to actually making something that is delicious and nutritious here.

  • RaneadosRaneados Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    mrt144 wrote: »
    Raneados wrote: »
    mrt144 wrote: »
    Delzhand wrote: »
    Make 1 cup of rice
    add a can of tuna
    add a can of rinsed black beans

    BAM

    Season as desired, but it's pretty good unseasoned, too.

    This sounds absolutely abysmal both in taste and effort.

    it's actually pretty good for a basic meal

    and what is "abysmal effort"?

    like...1) it's too much effort for what you get?
    2) or is it not enough effort?


    because 1) no it's not
    2) that's the point

    If you hate food, then sure, you could eat this. There is no effort to actually making something that is delicious and nutritious here.

    feel free to give advice on something better and objectively tastier

    Dubh wrote: »
    Rane is the future of ancient greek tradition
  • RaneadosRaneados Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    ooh I'll also recommend some stew

    stew is easy as hell, will last forever, and you can mass-produce it with like 0 effort

    tomato soup, potatoes, carrots, onions, garlic, some meat, white/red cooking wine, a little water in a big pot

    season with whatever you like and cook on low for like 10 hours

    amazing


    (make sure you sear the meat a little before putting it in the stew for some texture)

    Dubh wrote: »
    Rane is the future of ancient greek tradition
  • mrt144mrt144 King of the Numbernames Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Pinwheel sandwiches;

    1. Half a stick cream cheese, Half round of smoked mozz grated, 1/2 cup crumbled feta, 3 chopped green onions, splash of milk into food processor. pulse till well mixed then salt and pepper to taste. this is a spread/dip you can use for a multitude of things. You'll have enough for a week.
    2. Get thin sliced peppered turkey from your local deli
    3. Cut a tomato into thin slices
    4. Get a pack of burrito size tortillas
    5. Package of sprouts

    Spread Green Onion Feta spread on one side of tortilla. Put the tomato slices, then the sprouts, then peppered turkey. Roll the tortilla and use a little spread to hold it together, then cut into fourths.

    Sure, it's a type sandwich but it's tastier than a sandwich and more nutritious and it takes less time to make than rice.

    A food processor is a lunch's best friend.

  • mrt144mrt144 King of the Numbernames Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Raneados wrote: »
    ooh I'll also recommend some stew

    stew is easy as hell, will last forever, and you can mass-produce it with like 0 effort

    tomato soup, potatoes, carrots, onions, garlic, some meat, white/red cooking wine, a little water in a big pot

    season with whatever you like and cook on low for like 10 hours

    amazing


    (make sure you sear the meat a little before putting it in the stew for some texture)

    Mushy carrots and disintegrated potatoes...okay...so this is really about putting the least amount of effort into preparing food as possible and not caring about results.

    My fiancee said that isn't stew, it's a travesty.

  • mrt144mrt144 King of the Numbernames Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
  • mrt144mrt144 King of the Numbernames Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Raneados wrote: »
    mrt144 wrote: »
    Raneados wrote: »
    mrt144 wrote: »
    Delzhand wrote: »
    Make 1 cup of rice
    add a can of tuna
    add a can of rinsed black beans

    BAM

    Season as desired, but it's pretty good unseasoned, too.

    This sounds absolutely abysmal both in taste and effort.

    it's actually pretty good for a basic meal

    and what is "abysmal effort"?

    like...1) it's too much effort for what you get?
    2) or is it not enough effort?


    because 1) no it's not
    2) that's the point

    If you hate food, then sure, you could eat this. There is no effort to actually making something that is delicious and nutritious here.

    feel free to give advice on something better and objectively tastier

    Here is something objectively better with similar ingredients.

    * 1 cup of chopped red onions or shallots
    * The zest and juice of 1 lemon or 2 limes (can sub a tablespoon or two of cider vinegar)
    * 2 five to six ounce cans of tuna packed in olive oil
    * 2 15-ounce cans of cannellini or Great Northern white beans, rinsed and drained
    * 1/2 cup of chopped mint, parsley, or arugula
    * A few splashes of Tabasco sauce, or 1 minced Serrano chile or 1 teaspoon red chile flakes
    * 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
    * Salt and olive oil to taste

    1 Sprinkle some of the lemon juice over the chopped onions while you prepare the other ingredients. This will take some of the oniony edge off the onions.

    2 Drain the oil from the tuna and put the tuna into a large bowl. Add the beans to the tuna and gently stir to combine. Add the onions, herbs, black pepper, lemon zest and lemon juice and mix to combine. Add Tabasco or chile to taste. If the salad needs more acid, add a little more lemon juice. If the salad seems a little dry, add a little bit of olive oil. Add salt to taste.

    3 Chill before serving. This salad will last several days in the fridge, tightly covered.

    Serves 4.

    http://simplyrecipes.com/recipes/white_bean_and_tuna_salad/

  • mrt144mrt144 King of the Numbernames Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Cirira wrote: »
    I tried an experiment last week. I spent 10 dollars on lunch meat + bread for sandwhiches. I had enough food for about 8 sandwhiches so it almost lasted me 2 weeks. I routinely spent 6-10 dollars when I eat out for lunch.

    The food I fix is usually MUCH healthier on top of cheaper. If I make the food I spend about 8-15 dollars a week, whereas when I eat out it's 30-50 dollars a week. Saving a minimum of 20 dollars a week doesn't seem like much but that 1k can go a long ways.

    This is one of the most amazing revelations you can have in your mid 20s along with brewing a pot of coffee at home and buying a thermos can save you so much money over the course of a month.

    Most the time, we only eat out after cooking for 5-6 days straight, or if it's something we're genuinely ill equipped or unable to do well. Leftovers are a primary staple of our lunch diet.

  • RaneadosRaneados Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    mrt144 wrote: »
    Raneados wrote: »
    ooh I'll also recommend some stew

    stew is easy as hell, will last forever, and you can mass-produce it with like 0 effort

    tomato soup, potatoes, carrots, onions, garlic, some meat, white/red cooking wine, a little water in a big pot

    season with whatever you like and cook on low for like 10 hours

    amazing


    (make sure you sear the meat a little before putting it in the stew for some texture)

    Mushy carrots and disintegrated potatoes

    no?

    Dubh wrote: »
    Rane is the future of ancient greek tradition
  • DusT_HounDDusT_HounD Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Uh, Mrt, could you maybe try to be a little more confrontational? I don't think we're getting enough negative vibes from you in here.

    @ OP: I'm seconding Raneados' stew advice, but i'd advocate using small new potatoes, with skins, which helps keep them as discrete entities, rather than breaking down into mush during cooking, and tradeoff of chunk size versus cooking time will ensure that you have a stew containing carrots, onions etc. as opposed to a paste. After a couple of tries, you will be able to get the right combination, so that all the components are well-flavoured, AND still maintain their shape/ integrity.

  • RaneadosRaneados Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    that might be why they didn't disintegrate, I did keep the skins on

    because the skin is the best part!

    Dubh wrote: »
    Rane is the future of ancient greek tradition
  • TethTeth __BANNED USERS
    edited June 2010
    Many Korean dishes are cheap and easy to make, and also healthy and nutritious. For example, Yukgaejang with lean meat, or Bi Bim Bap with meat substitute (soy). They may take 30 minutes to prepare, but if you have the time it's worth it.

    I'd also suggest purchasing a blender so you can make smoothies for breakfast. A little bit of fat free yogurt, fat free milk or juice (I prefer mango or peach), and a few frozen fruits like strawberries or blueberries is not only chock full of vitamins and antioxidants, but also fat free and tasty. Surprisingly filling too.

    #1
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