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[veterinary/dog] Scabbing on legs?

WassermeloneWassermelone Registered User regular
edited September 2010 in Help / Advice Forum
So, first off, we will be making a veterinary appointment tomorrow.

Our dog had what we thought was a scab on one leg. As of today, theres a scab/growth/rash on all four legs. Its rough - sort of looks like road rash of some sort.

Any thoughts?

Wassermelone on

Posts

  • ceresceres Just your problem OooModerator mod
    edited September 2010
    Is it possible that when you're not around he's licking himself raw? This was a MAJOR problem for one of my dogs.

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  • vonPoonBurGervonPoonBurGer Registered User
    edited September 2010
    Is it like a callus on your dog's elbows? If so, my two year old lab cross has had those since we got him, when he was a year old. We asked the vet about them, and they said it's common to see them in older large-breed dogs, they're just rough, dry skin calluses that come from lying on rough or hard surfaces. Our dog was a rescue, he spent some time on the street so that might explain why he's got them younger than usual. Plus when it's hot in summer he'll lie on the coolest surface he can find, which will normally be tile or hardwood floor, and that'll promote callus formation.

    If it's red/inflamed or cracked/bleeding, then you should definitely have the vet take a look. Same if your dog shows any signs of pain or flinching when you're checking out the spots. If it's in an area of the leg where the dog doesn't rest his/her weight when lying down (i.e. not on the elbows), then it's probably something different and you should definitely have a vet look into it.

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  • HK5HK5 Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Scabs make me think mange but it could be a lot of different things, from parasites to allergies. Try to keep him from making it worse via licking, scratching, etc. until he can see a vet. I'd also suggest washing your hands thoroughly after touching him on the off chance that it's something infectious (ringworm, etc).

  • KistraKistra Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    Has the dog been to the groomer lately and does the groomer shave their legs? Clipper burn can look like road rash.

    Going to the vet is definitely the safe choice. If you want better suggestions from H/A you are going to need to provide a few more details like location of the lesions, size of lesions, type of dog, and anything unusual your dog has done lately.

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  • WassermeloneWassermelone Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    No groomer recently -

    The scab/rash/lesions are about an inch across on his forearm/pastern. Hes also missing hair there. We think hes corgi/american eskimo, but its not certain as hes adopted.

    The only unusual thing lately is that my wife recently got a job and as such hes home alone more often now. We don't crate him as he has huge issues with crating due to obvious abuse before we adopted him. I come home during lunch for an hour and play fetch with him, take him to pee/etc. I even bring him to work for the second half of the day. But regardless, hes still home alone a lot more often now, and he because of his past, my wife and I are leaning towards a licking problem from seperation anxiety.

    We threw a cone on him to keep him from licking, until anything from the vet.

  • ceresceres Just your problem OooModerator mod
    edited September 2010
    It is an awful, awful problem to watch. For our dog, there was absolutely nothing we could do to stop her. Nothing seemed to help. I hope that's not what it is, or if it is that your vet can think of something.

    I've got my own life and I've got my own plans
    I hope you understand, and like the way that I am
    Dear Satan...
  • 28682868 Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    I used to work as a Vet tech, and have owned and loved a few dogs in my time.

    It is likely acral lick dermatitis. If it is, the cone is one solution but it's not a good one, the better solution is to keep the dog engaged. Rawhides are a fine way to do this when you can't spend time with him. I'd say try for 15-20 minutes of hard fun exercise in the morning, then a rawhide treat during the day if you are out of the house or occupied, then make sure he gets 15-20 minutes of exercise in the evening.

    edit: I just saw that you go home in the day. This is good. Try for a round three periods of exercise. I know this is hard, I falter regularly.

    It is also important the dog get to wind down with the "pack," that's you and the rest of the household, during the evening after dinner. So if you're watching TV, gaming, reading, etc, make sure you invite the dog into the room with you and take a few moments to engage him, stop to pet him, say his name, ask him to do a trick if he begins to pace or lick, etc.

    See the vet of course, but the steps above are positive ways to avoid the lick dermatitis.

    TL;DR, your dog is probably licking himself because he is bored.

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  • 28682868 Registered User regular
    edited September 2010
    ceres wrote: »
    It is an awful, awful problem to watch. For our dog, there was absolutely nothing we could do to stop her. Nothing seemed to help. I hope that's not what it is, or if it is that your vet can think of something.

    Once it develops this is true. The dog licks because she is bored, which develops an irritation, now she licks the irritation.

    It's a bad habit. Think of it like as you would humans who bite their nails or cuticles.

    Warhams. Allatime warhams.

    buy warhams
  • ceresceres Just your problem OooModerator mod
    edited September 2010
    2868 wrote: »
    ceres wrote: »
    It is an awful, awful problem to watch. For our dog, there was absolutely nothing we could do to stop her. Nothing seemed to help. I hope that's not what it is, or if it is that your vet can think of something.

    Once it develops this is true. The dog licks because she is bored, which develops an irritation, now she licks the irritation.

    It's a bad habit. Think of it like as you would humans who bite their nails or cuticles.
    This, only you can't explain to them why it's bad or how they're hurting themselves as they compulsively chew their own legs off.

    I've got my own life and I've got my own plans
    I hope you understand, and like the way that I am
    Dear Satan...
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