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Should we revamp how we name ourselves?

electricitylikesmeelectricitylikesme Registered User regular
edited December 2010 in Debate and/or Discourse
So I don't like how we currently assign names to ourselves. In a society moving towards equality, it doesn't strike me as particularly consistent or practical.

I feel there has to be a better way, but I don't know what it should be, or how it should work.

To be clear: "Firstname Lastname" nomenclature seems fundamentally inefficient. Indications of heritage only propagate from one parent at best. No matter how you roll it, you can't contain a decent history in there or a fair appraisal of one's formative influences.

I don't like this. At the very least I think both parent's should get a fair representation in the name, without deferrence to either and without encumbering the name with hyphenation. Some type of phonetics arrangements which kind of naturally mutates would be ideal, but what should this be?

As a motivator for discussion, I present an example of how The Culture does names for biological citizens, although there's the obvious issue that in our world you can't switch sex at will and the social expectation isn't for every adult to have 1 child during their 400 years of life:
Some humanoid or drone Culture citizens have long names, often with seven or more words. Some of these words specify the citizen's origin (place of birth or manufacture), some an occupation, and some (chosen later in life by the citizen themselves) may denote specific philosophical or political alignments, or make other similarly personal statements. An example would be Diziet Sma whose full name is Rasd-Coduresa Diziet Embless Sma da' Marenhide:
  • Rasd-Coduresa is the planetary system of her birth, and the specific object (planet, orbital, Dyson sphere, etc.). The '-sa' suffix is roughly equivalent to '-er' in English. By this convention, Earth humans would all be named Sol-Terrasa (or Sun-Earther).
  • Diziet is her given name. This is chosen by a parent, usually the mother.
  • Embless is her chosen name. Most Culture citizens choose this when they reach adulthood (according to The Player of Games this is known as "completing one's name"). As with all conventions in the Culture, it may be broken or ignored: some change their chosen name during their lives, some never take one.
  • Sma is her surname, usually taken from one's mother.
  • da' Marenhide is the 'house'/estate she was raised within, the 'da' or 'dam' being similar to 'von' in German.
  • Iain Banks has given his own Culture name as "Sun-Earther Iain El-Bonko Banks of Queensferry"

So, D&D'ers - what do you think. How do we choose our names such that we give fair deference to the genetic parentage of someone, their own personality, their formative experience, or significant influences? And how do we do it in a way which is sustainable over multiple generations of names?

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  • EchoEcho staring is caring Super Moderator, Moderator mod
    edited December 2010
    I just knew you'd make a Culture reference. :P

  • japanjapan Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    I think it doesn't really matter how we name ourselves as long as a useful, consistent and unique identifier can be agreed on.

    When names are used, dealing with large groups of people named Mohammed, Singh, or Kaur is always a bit of a pain.

  • matt has a problemmatt has a problem Six pack on a dick Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    Names really don't carry the weight they once did. The huge importance of male-parent lineage isn't there any more. For all "official" means, we're identified by a number (social security, driver's license etc). These days you can call yourself whatever you want really. All that really matters in both official and unofficial capacity is consistency. As long as the government knows your official name is Spiderman, and your groups of friends all know you go by Spider-Man, it doesn't really matter.

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  • EchoEcho staring is caring Super Moderator, Moderator mod
    edited December 2010
    These days you can call yourself whatever you want really. All that really matters in both official and unofficial capacity is consistency. As long as the government knows your official name is Spiderman, and your groups of friends all know you go by Spider-Man, it doesn't really matter.

    Dunno how it works elsewhere, but you can't legally change your name however you want here in Sweden. It needs to be accepted by bureaucracy first, and they deny anything too outlandish.

  • japanjapan Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    Apparently Canada doesn't allow anyone with the surname Singh or Kaur to immigrate unless they change their name first. I didn't know that.

  • matt has a problemmatt has a problem Six pack on a dick Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    Echo wrote: »
    These days you can call yourself whatever you want really. All that really matters in both official and unofficial capacity is consistency. As long as the government knows your official name is Spiderman, and your groups of friends all know you go by Spider-Man, it doesn't really matter.

    Dunno how it works elsewhere, but you can't legally change your name however you want here in Sweden. It needs to be accepted by bureaucracy first, and they deny anything too outlandish.
    True, but your legal name, and the name everyone calls you don't have to be the same thing. And you don't have to be officially named what everyone calls you. If your birth certificate says Jenny, but you tell all your friends and coworkers you go by Bill, they're going to call you Bill. As long as you sign Jenny on your license renewal form, no one will care.

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  • TL DRTL DR Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    japan wrote: »
    Apparently Canada doesn't allow anyone with the surname Singh or Kaur to immigrate unless they change their name first. I didn't know that.
    Wiki= wrote:
    A section of around a million adherents of Sikhism that live abroad in Western countries only keep Singh or Kaur as their last name. This has caused legal problems in immigration procedures especially in Canada with Canadian High Commission in New Delhi, India for a decade stating in letters to its Sikh clients "the names Kaur and Singh do not qualify for the purpose of immigration to Canada" people with these common Sikh surnames have to change their last names before coming to Canada.

    The ban was denounced by the Sikh community, after which theCitizenship and Immigration Canada announced it was dropping the policy, calling the whole thing a misunderstanding based on a "poorly worded" letter.

    eokNV.jpg
  • DeebaserDeebaser Alpha Teemo Fake Board GamerRegistered User regular
    edited December 2010
    japan wrote: »
    Singh, or Kaur is always a bit of a pain.

    It's not really a pain, but it is hella confusing. <3 my Sikhs.

  • electricitylikesmeelectricitylikesme Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    Echo wrote: »
    I just knew you'd make a Culture reference. :P

    I like to work backwards from perfection to see how we can get there.

    But it's a vexing problem.

  • enc0reenc0re Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    I say we ditch last names. Freely changeable first names for all, plus an IPv6 address for unique identification.

  • electricitylikesmeelectricitylikesme Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    enc0re wrote: »
    I say we ditch last names. Freely changeable first names for all, plus an IPv6 address for unique identification.

    This would actually be pretty god damn awesome, but I suspect that without implantable cellphones it wouldn't grab.

    Although it does make me wonder if you could recode IPv6 into base-36 and get phonetically pronounceable names.

  • LoklarLoklar Registered User
    edited December 2010
    There's a lot to think about here.

    But I think with the internet, and rap culture :D, we're just going to move to a system where you have a "government name" and your handle. Which I think is a pretty good system.

    Most of us choose to use the name our parents gave us. Most of our parents were old school and gave us our dad's last name, and some sort of gender-appropriate first name. Girl children get crazy names with funky spelling. Boys get run-of-the-mill names, usually biblical (John, Paul, etc.. I don't know the bible very well).

    But yea on WoW, and here, I'm Loklar. My best friend uses a stylized version of my name. And at work I use my government name. It seems to work out okay.

    --
    I don't think it's necessarily a good thing that everyone would have a "unique" name. Often people with unique names are easier to track down by the media and by government workers. If you start looking for "John Smith" on facebook, you won't get any leads. But if your name is highly unusual it makes it very easy for people to find you, which is a blessing and a curse.

    Which is the reason why I don't use my real name on Facebook. But I'm a little more security conscience than most.

  • ElJeffeElJeffe Super Moderator, Moderator, ClubPA mod
    edited December 2010
    So ELM, are you seriously suggesting we should have seven-word-long names that incorporate specific modifiers to indicate profession and personalty and the like, or are you just kidding? Because that is pretty much the most horrible naming system I've ever heard.

    Unless the expectation is that your legal name changes every time you change jobs or your personality changes a bit.

    Like was said, the exact structure of our names isn't that important these days. Or rather, it's exactly as important as you want it to be. If you want to make your name "Robert Joseph Electrician Nee Johnson of Philadelphia," hey, go wild. If you want the more manageable "Edgar Smith," that's cool, too. (Assuming you don't live in one of the retarded places that only let you change your name to bureaucratically acceptable things, of course.) If you want your name to show off both your matrilineal and patrilineal origins, you can do that. If, like most people, you don't much care, that's fine.

    tl;dr: No, we should not revamp how we name ourselves.

    Maddie: "I named my feet. The left one is flip and the right one is flop. Oh, and also I named my flip-flops."

    I make tweet.
  • enc0reenc0re Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    @Loklar Relying on namespace collisions for privacy strikes me as poor design. Sorry to be so harsh.

  • Kobi Kobi KooKobi Kobi Koo __BANNED USERS
    edited December 2010
    There is nothing to revamp.

    If you want to have a specific type of naming structure, then use it.

  • Loren MichaelLoren Michael Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    I just go by my first and middle names. Like, everywhere. Passport and official stuff still have the full Loren Michael ______-_____, but whatever. Loren Michael has a nice ring to it, and I hope to one day have a line of designer swimwear or handbags with my name on them.

    2ezikn6.jpg
  • electricitylikesmeelectricitylikesme Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    ElJeffe wrote: »
    So ELM, are you seriously suggesting we should have seven-word-long names that incorporate specific modifiers to indicate profession and personalty and the like, or are you just kidding? Because that is pretty much the most horrible naming system I've ever heard.

    Unless the expectation is that your legal name changes every time you change jobs or your personality changes a bit.

    Like was said, the exact structure of our names isn't that important these days. Or rather, it's exactly as important as you want it to be. If you want to make your name "Robert Joseph Electrician Nee Johnson of Philadelphia," hey, go wild. If you want the more manageable "Edgar Smith," that's cool, too. (Assuming you don't live in one of the retarded places that only let you change your name to bureaucratically acceptable things, of course.) If you want your name to show off both your matrilineal and patrilineal origins, you can do that. If, like most people, you don't much care, that's fine.

    tl;dr: No, we should not revamp how we name ourselves.

    The cited example doesn't include profession modifiers or anything like that - all that information is reasonably fixed, and I should note, tradition rather then requirement.

    The idea I'm putting forward is if we could develop a system which had a set of syllables which interacted well and mutated in a sensible way from generation to generation, or which incorporated a bunch of information which indicated ancestory in a fair way.

    I'm basically arguing that we should revamp tradition to be better, even if we still end up running by nethandles or whathaveyou.

    Why should my mother's family name meet a dead-end instead of my father's name, when I'd rather somehow preserve both in a consistent manner.

  • Kobi Kobi KooKobi Kobi Koo __BANNED USERS
    edited December 2010
    If you want to preserve your mothers family name, add it your last name.

  • ToxTox I kill threads Pharezon's human garbage heapRegistered User regular
    edited December 2010
    My girlfriend and I have had conversations about the lastname issue. Namely, I don't like mine, and since she's expecting to change hers, anyway, we've discussed the idea of both taking a new last name. Both of our mothers' maiden names are one syllable, so we've considered becoming the "Glassmiths" because that's not over complex, it's easy to pronounce, and I think it actually sounds kind of cool.

    I've also wanted to change my last name to "Koenn" for purely personal interests. Probably won't, though.

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  • LoklarLoklar Registered User
    edited December 2010
    enc0re wrote: »
    @Loklar Relying on namespace collisions for privacy strikes me as poor design. Sorry to be so harsh.

    It's not harsh at all, you're simply wrong. If someone REALLY wants to find you, they can. But there's no reason to make it easy. And particularly journalists will give up if leads go cold (because of deadlines and news cycles. They tend to find people who are easy to find.

    Story behind spoiler tag:
    Edit: This story is just an example. I made up the names because I couldn't remember the specifics. The newspaper story is linked in a post below, which shows that my example story spoiler'd below, is accurate.
    Spoiler:

  • LoklarLoklar Registered User
    edited December 2010
    Found the newspaper article. Just to prove the story I wrote above.

    Here's the Newspaper article in question: http://www.thestar.com/article/553330
    Quami Frederick used her bachelor's degree to get into Toronto's Osgoode Hall law school and was offered a job articling with a Bay St. law firm.

    Rest of the story in the link.

    Quami Frederick was chosen because it's an extremely rare name combination. Made her easy to find.

  • enc0reenc0re Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    I'm of the opinion that everybody that bought one of those fake degrees should have been nailed for it. Here, uniqueness would have been very valuable.

    I'm not dismissing that privacy is important (just not in this specific example). What I am saying is that if this were a case of privacy needing to be protected, the system (namespace collisions) is unreliable. Some, with common names, are protected to a degree. Others have no such protection and suffer a spill over effect from being the easiest target on the block.

    Privacy has to be solved by better information security, for example encryption. Obfuscation will get you nowhere and may conceal underlying issues.

  • PerpetualPerpetual Registered User
    edited December 2010
    Shakespeare said, "What is in a name?"

    I couldn't agree more.

    It's just a name.

    (Yes, I know Shakespeare said it in a different context, but still.)

  • matt has a problemmatt has a problem Six pack on a dick Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    Loklar wrote: »
    Found the newspaper article. Just to prove the story I wrote above.

    Here's the Newspaper article in question: http://www.thestar.com/article/553330
    Quami Frederick used her bachelor's degree to get into Toronto's Osgoode Hall law school and was offered a job articling with a Bay St. law firm.

    Rest of the story in the link.

    Quami Frederick was chosen because it's an extremely rare name combination. Made her easy to find.
    This is more a case of laziness and deadlines in a single industry though. If they were seeking prosecution of the people purchasing fake degrees, I'm guessing they wouldn't discard people simply because their name was common.

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  • AriviaArivia Registered User
    edited December 2010
    We should all change our names to our porn star names.

    Little Snookums am I!

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  • LoklarLoklar Registered User
    edited December 2010
    Loklar wrote: »
    Found the newspaper article. Just to prove the story I wrote above.

    Here's the Newspaper article in question: http://www.thestar.com/article/553330
    Quami Frederick used her bachelor's degree to get into Toronto's Osgoode Hall law school and was offered a job articling with a Bay St. law firm.

    Rest of the story in the link.

    Quami Frederick was chosen because it's an extremely rare name combination. Made her easy to find.
    This is more a case of laziness and deadlines in a single industry though. If they were seeking prosecution of the people purchasing fake degrees, I'm guessing they wouldn't discard people simply because their name was common.

    Laziness? Do you know how hard it is to actually say someone is a liar in print? If you're wrong you get sued and fired. Journalists don't have extra powers like police or lawyers do, all they have is the same tools as common citizens.

    @enc0re

    It's not a journalist's job to bust every single degree cheat. Dale Brazo tells stories, true stories. That's his job. Finding a few degree cheats, and telling the world that there are hundreds of others in the country is enough to tell a story.

    Once you found 3 or 4 cheats, what's the point in going after more? The readers don't want to read about 100 degree cheats, they just want to read about a few and see how big of a problem it is. Tomorrow they want a new story about a different topic. If the reporter kept writing every day about new degree cheats, pretty soon people would become bored and stop reading.

    It's the government's job to prosecute all the other people and haul them to court.

  • Dread Pirate ArbuthnotDread Pirate Arbuthnot Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    My boyfriend and I have discussed merging our last names if we get married (Marshall + Odell = Mardell, or something like that), or even him taking my last name. We eventually agreed on keeping things traditional to pacify his family (he's the only male in this generation of his family across the board, and his relatives are very family focused. If our kids aren't Odells, the family line disappears)

    It was an interesting talk, though. I will probably keep my last name when I get married, its such a big part of my identity.

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  • ElJeffeElJeffe Super Moderator, Moderator, ClubPA mod
    edited December 2010
    Why should my mother's family name meet a dead-end instead of my father's name, when I'd rather somehow preserve both in a consistent manner.

    So what you want is to shuttle the current arbitrary tradition that nobody pays much thought to in favor of a new arbitrary tradition that nobody pays much thought to?

    I mean, encoding specific information in certain syllables is a really good way to transfer information, if that's what you're seeking to do. Problem is, pretty much nobody is seeking to do so in the way you desire. To most people, a name is just that thing you use so people know who you are. Most people probably wouldn't get anything out of the new system, except now we have to worry about seven names instead of two or three.

    (And you did mention occupation and political/philosophical alignments as potential naming elements.)

    Also, do you really think tracking ancestry in a very public and readily apparent way is a good thing? Do we want to reestablish the importance of bloodlines? Great, 'cause I was just thinking we don't have enough ways to pigeonhole and discriminate against people. ;-)

    Basically, you're offering a solution in search of a problem. The current system allows you to put whatever important bits you want into your name. You can call yourself almost anything you want (I assume things like "Fuckcock McDarkieSlayer" are not currently acceptable), so if you want to point out both your parents, just hyphenate your last name, or what have you. And do the same for your kids, if such is your desire.

    Maddie: "I named my feet. The left one is flip and the right one is flop. Oh, and also I named my flip-flops."

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  • japanjapan Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    A lot of things involving credit reference agencies suddenly get quite complicated if you have changed your name, unless you're female and took a married name.

    It would be nice if that wasn't the case, because it's a pretty big disincentive.

  • ElJeffeElJeffe Super Moderator, Moderator, ClubPA mod
    edited December 2010
    My boyfriend and I have discussed merging our last names if we get married (Marshall + Odell = Mardell, or something like that), or even him taking my last name. We eventually agreed on keeping things traditional to pacify his family (he's the only male in this generation of his family across the board, and his relatives are very family focused. If our kids aren't Odells, the family line disappears)

    It was an interesting talk, though. I will probably keep my last name when I get married, its such a big part of my identity.

    My wife took mine because she really hated her own and thought mine was cool.

    If I ever remarry, I would be amenable to taking the girl's name if it was a cool name, but I'm wagering that we'd also just go the traditional route, because most people don't care enough to buck tradition.

    Maddie: "I named my feet. The left one is flip and the right one is flop. Oh, and also I named my flip-flops."

    I make tweet.
  • Casually HardcoreCasually Hardcore Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    I honestly don't care about last name.

    I mean, hell, chances are is that last name was giving to my family by some slaver way back in the day. As for the whole family thing? So fucking what.

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  • DrukDruk Registered User
    edited December 2010
    In my personal ridiculous opinion, names should be treated the same as Trademarks (because really, that's kinda what they are), and no two people should be allowed to have identical or even similar-sounding names.

    C'mon, it would be fun!

  • Bionic MonkeyBionic Monkey Registered User, ClubPA
    edited December 2010
    ElJeffe wrote: »
    Why should my mother's family name meet a dead-end instead of my father's name, when I'd rather somehow preserve both in a consistent manner.

    So what you want is to shuttle the current arbitrary tradition that nobody pays much thought to in favor of a new arbitrary tradition that nobody pays much thought to?

    I mean, encoding specific information in certain syllables is a really good way to transfer information, if that's what you're seeking to do. Problem is, pretty much nobody is seeking to do so in the way you desire. To most people, a name is just that thing you use so people know who you are. Most people probably wouldn't get anything out of the new system, except now we have to worry about seven names instead of two or three.

    (And you did mention occupation and political/philosophical alignments as potential naming elements.)

    Also, do you really think tracking ancestry in a very public and readily apparent way is a good thing? Do we want to reestablish the importance of bloodlines? Great, 'cause I was just thinking we don't have enough ways to pigeonhole and discriminate against people. ;-)

    Basically, you're offering a solution in search of a problem. The current system allows you to put whatever important bits you want into your name. You can call yourself almost anything you want (I assume things like "Fuckcock McDarkieSlayer" are not currently acceptable), so if you want to point out both your parents, just hyphenate your last name, or what have you. And do the same for your kids, if such is your desire.

    And really, one of your parent's names is going to come to an end anyway, just a generation later when your child is born. Or do you intend to hyphenate two already hyphenated names? Thomas Michael Jones-Smith-Tyler-McPhee is going to get really damn unwieldy really damn fast.

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  • ZomroZomro Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    If you want to preserve your mothers family name, add it your last name.

    This is something that a lot of Latin cultures do, at least my family anyway. My legal last name is my father's last name followed by my mother's maiden name, with a dash inbetween. When the child has their own children, their last name would be the "first" last name (my father's) followed by the mother's maiden name (or their "first" last name if they have a similar naming convention for their last name). I've always liked that, allows for the name to represent where you come from, especially for me, since my father is Chilean and my mother is from England.

  • BehemothBehemoth Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    ElJeffe wrote: »
    So ELM, are you seriously suggesting we should have seven-word-long names that incorporate specific modifiers to indicate profession and personalty and the like, or are you just kidding? Because that is pretty much the most horrible naming system I've ever heard.

    Unless the expectation is that your legal name changes every time you change jobs or your personality changes a bit.

    Like was said, the exact structure of our names isn't that important these days. Or rather, it's exactly as important as you want it to be. If you want to make your name "Robert Joseph Electrician Nee Johnson of Philadelphia," hey, go wild. If you want the more manageable "Edgar Smith," that's cool, too. (Assuming you don't live in one of the retarded places that only let you change your name to bureaucratically acceptable things, of course.) If you want your name to show off both your matrilineal and patrilineal origins, you can do that. If, like most people, you don't much care, that's fine.

    tl;dr: No, we should not revamp how we name ourselves.

    The cited example doesn't include profession modifiers or anything like that - all that information is reasonably fixed, and I should note, tradition rather then requirement.

    The idea I'm putting forward is if we could develop a system which had a set of syllables which interacted well and mutated in a sensible way from generation to generation, or which incorporated a bunch of information which indicated ancestory in a fair way.

    I'm basically arguing that we should revamp tradition to be better, even if we still end up running by nethandles or whathaveyou.

    Why should my mother's family name meet a dead-end instead of my father's name, when I'd rather somehow preserve both in a consistent manner.

    Why do we need information about ancestry encoded into our names? As people have pointed out, it can get unnecessarily unwieldy very quickly. Wouldn't it be easier to just, I don't know, keep a record of it in a book or something? And it's not really critically useful information in this day and age.

    I don't need to know a person's ancestry when I first meet them. What would I do with that information? "Oh, that person is descended from the Portland, Oregon branch of the McElroy clan. That's... great?"

    iQbUbQsZXyt8I.png
  • BlendtecBlendtec PittsburghRegistered User regular
    edited December 2010
    Behemoth wrote: »
    ElJeffe wrote: »
    So ELM, are you seriously suggesting we should have seven-word-long names that incorporate specific modifiers to indicate profession and personalty and the like, or are you just kidding? Because that is pretty much the most horrible naming system I've ever heard.

    Unless the expectation is that your legal name changes every time you change jobs or your personality changes a bit.

    Like was said, the exact structure of our names isn't that important these days. Or rather, it's exactly as important as you want it to be. If you want to make your name "Robert Joseph Electrician Nee Johnson of Philadelphia," hey, go wild. If you want the more manageable "Edgar Smith," that's cool, too. (Assuming you don't live in one of the retarded places that only let you change your name to bureaucratically acceptable things, of course.) If you want your name to show off both your matrilineal and patrilineal origins, you can do that. If, like most people, you don't much care, that's fine.

    tl;dr: No, we should not revamp how we name ourselves.

    The cited example doesn't include profession modifiers or anything like that - all that information is reasonably fixed, and I should note, tradition rather then requirement.

    The idea I'm putting forward is if we could develop a system which had a set of syllables which interacted well and mutated in a sensible way from generation to generation, or which incorporated a bunch of information which indicated ancestory in a fair way.

    I'm basically arguing that we should revamp tradition to be better, even if we still end up running by nethandles or whathaveyou.

    Why should my mother's family name meet a dead-end instead of my father's name, when I'd rather somehow preserve both in a consistent manner.

    Why do we need information about ancestry encoded into our names? As people have pointed out, it can get unnecessarily unwieldy very quickly. Wouldn't it be easier to just, I don't know, keep a record of it in a book or something? And it's not really critically useful information in this day and age.

    I don't need to know a person's ancestry when I first meet them. What would I do with that information? "Oh, that person is descended from the Portland, Oregon branch of the McElroy clan. That's... great?"

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  • lonelyahavalonelyahava One day, I will be able to say to myself "I am beautiful and I am perfect just the way I am"Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    My first name is the same as my Paternal great Grandmother who died about 13 weeks before I was born. My middle name is not the same, but uses the same initial of my Maternal Great Aunt that died about 1 year before I was born. My last name is my father's family name.

    My father cares nothing about the last name and could care even less about the family on his father's side who gave it to him. I, personally, got fed up with my name in high school. I also like my future husband's last name very much. So, I'll be taking his name.

    As for remembering family and honoring traditions...

    My mother's family is from scotland, Lindsay clan to be exact (Paternal clan. Maternal clan is MacGregor). And in every generation of the family, one person has 'Lindsay' in their name. My Grandfather, My Uncle, and My cousin. And this goes back more generations as well. And, when/if I have a daughter, her middle name will be Lindsay in order to keep the family name going and to keep that connection, connected.

    As for my Father's family, we're jewish. Russian/Ukranian Jews to be exact. But jewish Tradition (as I've been taught) is to name a newborn child after a recently passed loved one. Either the full name, or the initial. As a way of keeping the family name possibly in tact, but also allowing a bit of the deceased memory to continue on in the family.

    That's why I was named Sarah. Because my great grandmother was very loved and my parents wanted to honor her life and love and so, here I am.

    I see no reason to change any of this, or these naming traditions in my family, as they really do work for me. My boyfriend and I have talked about it, in vague futuristic terms, and we pretty much agree.

    We both really like how Sarah sounds with his last name.

    My Little Corner of the World || I am ravelried! || My Steam!
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  • enc0reenc0re Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    Loklar wrote: »
    @enc0re

    It's not a journalist's job to bust every single degree cheat. Dale Brazo tells stories, true stories. That's his job. Finding a few degree cheats, and telling the world that there are hundreds of others in the country is enough to tell a story.

    Once you found 3 or 4 cheats, what's the point in going after more? The readers don't want to read about 100 degree cheats, they just want to read about a few and see how big of a problem it is. Tomorrow they want a new story about a different topic. If the reporter kept writing every day about new degree cheats, pretty soon people would become bored and stop reading.

    It's the government's job to prosecute all the other people and haul them to court.

    I'm not criticizing the journalist. I'm criticizing our naming system. That degree list should have been a series of IPv6 addresses uniquely identifying the fraudsters.
    B.B.A. in Business Administration
    with a major in Accounting
    is hereby awarded to
    3ffe:1900:4545:3:200:f8ff:fe21:67cf ("Andrew")

  • matt has a problemmatt has a problem Six pack on a dick Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    enc0re wrote: »
    Loklar wrote: »
    @enc0re

    It's not a journalist's job to bust every single degree cheat. Dale Brazo tells stories, true stories. That's his job. Finding a few degree cheats, and telling the world that there are hundreds of others in the country is enough to tell a story.

    Once you found 3 or 4 cheats, what's the point in going after more? The readers don't want to read about 100 degree cheats, they just want to read about a few and see how big of a problem it is. Tomorrow they want a new story about a different topic. If the reporter kept writing every day about new degree cheats, pretty soon people would become bored and stop reading.

    It's the government's job to prosecute all the other people and haul them to court.

    I'm not criticizing the journalist. I'm criticizing our naming system. That degree list should have been a series of IPv6 addresses uniquely identifying the fraudsters.
    B.B.A. in Business Administration
    with a major in Accounting
    is hereby awarded to
    3ffe:1900:4545:3:200:f8ff:fe21:67cf ("Andrew")
    We already have social security numbers in the US. We don't need another stupid number to remember. Not to mention the shitstorm the fundies would stir up about it being the Mark of the Beast or something.

    h1DI1.jpg
    All my fuckin life I lived a normal fuckin life
  • DetharinDetharin Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    I fail to see the reason why. I am not my name, it is merely an easy way to get my attention and reference me. While a computer might possibly need to know that I am the Detharin born in Las Vegas, of X years old, with Y parents, etc. Your average human is going to know me and be able to differentiate me either based on last name/nick name, or largely have no idea who I am.

    Would changing my name to Detharin Las Vegas 19xx Graduate of UNLV Son Of... be any better than if my name was He Who's Name is Not Spoken Under Penalty of Evisceration No Not Him the Other One?

    If I was kidnapped, woke up in a lab, told they were going to replace my vocal cords with those of Tony Jay, and lock me in a sound booth until the day I die I would look those bastards right in the eye and say "Alright you sons of bitches lets do this. This one is for the children."
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