Our new Indie Games subforum is now open for business in G&T. Go and check it out, you might land a code for a free game. If you're developing an indie game and want to post about it, follow these directions. If you don't, he'll break your legs! Hahaha! Seriously though.
Our rules have been updated and given their own forum. Go and look at them! They are nice, and there may be new ones that you didn't know about! Hooray for rules! Hooray for The System! Hooray for Conforming!

The [GNU/Linux] thread, where 'Windows' is always spelled properly.

1272830323335

Posts

  • proyebatproyebat Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    HD4870
    iirc using catalyst 11.2
    used the command "aticonfig --initial=dual-head --screen-layout=right"
    and enabling xinerama through amdcccle.

    455Bo4O.png
  • FremFrem Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    I kind of like Unity. It's not bad for an initial release.

    But Ubuntu 11.04 has some sort of kernel glitch on my hardware that makes all disk IO breathtakingly slow. Like, any IO at all makes the machine sluggish and unresponsive, and something like importing a few gigs of photos into Shotwell pushed my machine into an alternate timestream for 40 minutes. (40 minutes was when I switched to tty1 and killed the process in slow motion. iotop showed between 10-30% CPU activity. :P )

  • DarlanDarlan Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Hrm. I'm a very new user to Linux and recently set up a Win7/Ubuntu dual boot on my netbook, but am now interested in single booting into Linux since most all I use the netbook for is firefox and some word processing. (So I may as well take advantage of the security benefits like lack of linux viruses "out there" and such, I figure.)

    However, when I tried to use my newly made Ubuntu 11.40 USB installer, all I'm getting is a bunch of "directory does not exist" errors before the install process even begins. Might anyone know whats going on?

    Edit: Also, I'm a bit curious: can viruses and male-ware obtained in the Windows portion of a dual booted computer mess things up for the Linux part while dual booting into Ubuntu on the same machine somehow? Pardon me if this is a dumb question, I'm very new to dual booting and Linux in general.

    steam_sig.png
  • elliotw2elliotw2 Registered User
    edited May 2011
    Darlan wrote: »
    Hrm. I'm a very new user to Linux and recently set up a Win7/Ubuntu dual boot on my netbook, but am now interested in single booting into Linux since most all I use the netbook for is firefox and some word processing. (So I may as well take advantage of the security benefits like lack of linux viruses "out there" and such, I figure.)

    However, when I tried to use my newly made Ubuntu 11.40 USB installer, all I'm getting is a bunch of "directory does not exist" errors before the install process even begins. Might anyone know whats going on?

    Edit: Also, I'm a bit curious: can viruses and male-ware obtained in the Windows portion of a dual booted computer mess things up for the Linux part while dual booting into Ubuntu on the same machine somehow? Pardon me if this is a dumb question, I'm very new to dual booting and Linux in general.

    Linux generally doesn't have to worry about viruses, since the way it is designed the root user would have to give the virus permission to exist. A windows virus can't affect Linux (in most cases) for the same reason that you can't run MS Word in Linux. Now, a Windows virus downloaded on linux, and put into a shared partition could very well affect your Windows install, but not the other way around.

    For the Ubuntu install problems, I always just used unetbootin to setup the USB stick, and it's not ever had problems.

    camo_sig2.pngXBL:Elliotw3|PSN:elliotw2
  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    As always, safe practices prevail. Don't open shit you don't know, don't visit potentially dangerous sites (usually easy to tell by the link itself).

    But the chances of getting a virus in linux are pretty slim. Mainly because very few people use it, so using it as a vector for a botnet or trojan wouldn't net you much, and definitely wouldn't be as destructive.

  • electricitylikesmeelectricitylikesme Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    The sad thing about modern malware is I doubt you need to worry about viruses. Just list "I love you" in an email and most users would happily enter their root password.

    The Company: The CYOA game that anybody can join at any time - running now!
  • elliotw2elliotw2 Registered User
    edited May 2011
    bowen wrote: »
    As always, safe practices prevail. Don't open shit you don't know, don't visit potentially dangerous sites (usually easy to tell by the link itself).

    But the chances of getting a virus in linux are pretty slim. Mainly because very few people use it, so using it as a vector for a botnet or trojan wouldn't net you much, and definitely wouldn't be as destructive.

    You should have seen some systems I've experimented with. If you happen to have Wine installed, your system can get so fucked it's not funny.

    camo_sig2.pngXBL:Elliotw3|PSN:elliotw2
  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    I don't doubt it. It's why I avoid wine and go straight for virtualbox now. Seamless mode is nice.

  • elliotw2elliotw2 Registered User
    edited May 2011
    Wine is great, until you give it to people who click on every single banner ad. Then, your entire user account is fucked, and possibly the whole system, if they were stupid enough to run something like winedoors that can give Wine root access

    camo_sig2.pngXBL:Elliotw3|PSN:elliotw2
  • HakuninHakunin Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Anyone have any idea how to get the little light on the wireless button on my laptop to work in linux? If i try to connect with wireless without it turned on, the whole system crashes. As is, it's always orange(off) regardless if it's actually on or off.

    It's a HP 625 laptop with a Broadcom 4313 adapter running Arch.

  • FremFrem Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Hakunin wrote: »
    Anyone have any idea how to get the little light on the wireless button on my laptop to work in linux? If i try to connect with wireless without it turned on, the whole system crashes. As is, it's always orange(off) regardless if it's actually on or off.

    It's a HP 625 laptop with a Broadcom 4313 adapter running Arch.

    The output of the lspci command might help.

  • HakuninHakunin Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Frem wrote: »
    Hakunin wrote: »
    Anyone have any idea how to get the little light on the wireless button on my laptop to work in linux? If i try to connect with wireless without it turned on, the whole system crashes. As is, it's always orange(off) regardless if it's actually on or off.

    It's a HP 625 laptop with a Broadcom 4313 adapter running Arch.

    The output of the lspci command might help.

    Right, here we go:
    Spoiler:

  • 101101 Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Woops had to revert to ubuntu 10.10

    11.04 started to log me out as soon as I logged in. Now I've got to set everything up again :x

  • TincheTinche No dog food for Victor tonight. Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    After a week, I'm totally digging Unity now. Especially the launcher: super+2 switches me to Firefox, super+3 to Terminator, super+4 gedit. I guess the gain is only there if you're switching between more than two applications, but I'm digging it.

    Now if only they can get all the small glitches out.

    We're marooned on a small island, in an endless sea,
    Confined to a tiny spit of sand, unable to escape,
    But tonight, it's heavy stuff.
  • VistiVisti Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    What exactly is Unity? The new Gnome thing?

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • TincheTinche No dog food for Victor tonight. Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Visti wrote: »
    What exactly is Unity? The new Gnome thing?

    It's the new Ubuntu UI everyone loves to hate nowadays. It's kinda like the new Gnome thing, but a little different. Imagine a stock Gnome 2 desktop, only there is no notification area* (just application indicators, which are kinda like notification icons but more limited and more consistent), no bottom task bar, a launcher with large icons permanently pinned to the left edge of the screen (can be configured with several types of auto-hide), and an OS X-like global menu in the top panel, where the Application/Places/System menu used to be.

    There are also a few new touches, like making the window controls pop into the top bar left of the global menu when a window is maximized so the window title bar doesn't have to be rendered, and a pretty spiffy launcher that's a cross between Gnome Do and the Windows 7 start menu, called the Dash.

    You can browse around at http://unity.ubuntu.com/ to see what it looks like (or just GIS it).

    *Technically the normal Gnome notification area is still there, only everything except Java, Wine and Skype is blacklisted.

    We're marooned on a small island, in an endless sea,
    Confined to a tiny spit of sand, unable to escape,
    But tonight, it's heavy stuff.
  • Monkey Ball WarriorMonkey Ball Warrior A collection of mediocre hats Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    edited May 2011
    I like some parts of it, but I dislike the scrollbars, and there's enough few minor annoyances that I've switched to Xubuntu, at least for a while to let them iron out the kinks and add some more customizability. It has potential.

    "I resent the entire notion of a body as an ante and then raise you a generalized dissatisfaction with physicality itself" -- Tycho
  • FremFrem Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    I like some parts of it, but I dislike the scrollbars, and there's enough few minor annoyances that I've switched to Xubuntu, at least for a while to let them iron out the kinks and add some more customizability. It has potential.

    I really like the general idea behind the scrolltabs (move your mouse into the scrollbar area and just start scrolling, don't worry about hitting the little moving bar), but they're way too fiddly right now (move your mouse inside the window. Haha, now outside again! Oh, your window is on the side of the screen? Now it's different!). If they change it so that the tab reliably appears underneath your mouse the same way every time, so you don't have to think about it, they'll be perfect.

  • TincheTinche No dog food for Victor tonight. Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    I don't know if this addresses your particular concerns, but you might be pleased to hear the scrollbars have already gotten some improvements in the Oneiric cycle: http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2011/05/overlay-scrollbars-get-first-improvements-for-ubuntu-11-10-video/.

    I'm liking the new scrollbars, if for nothing else then because it's actually easier to see them. The "normal" scrollbars look too similar to their, uh, troughs.

    We're marooned on a small island, in an endless sea,
    Confined to a tiny spit of sand, unable to escape,
    But tonight, it's heavy stuff.
  • Apothe0sisApothe0sis Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Would an i3 processor be sufficient to run raidz? Or would that be insufficient grunt for a FreeNAS server?

    What I see sees me.
    SODOMISE INTOLERANCE
    Tide goes in. Tide goes out.
  • TaminTamin Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    So I think I need some help here.

    The video card for my linux box has been intermittent for a few months now, so I've been connecting to it using putty. Earlier today, I was copying some videos from my windows 7 box to it via smbclient.

    The transfer seemed to be taking too long, so I opened another putty session to check the status - putty wouldn't connect. Tried to ping it, and got no response. A few power cycles (resets and full on/off) failed to accomplish anything.

    Grumbling, I located and installed the video card to see where the boot was failing.
    error: Unknown filesystem
    grub rescue >
    

    None of the commands beyond 'ls' seem to be available. ls does bring up hd0, hd0,1, and hd0,5. A further ls hd0 gives the same error: Unknown filesystem.

    Some cursory research brought up the idea that the motherboard or bios might not recognize a drive if the space used is more than 137 gigabytes. Since this happened just after copying files over, I plugged the drive into my primary computer, and received the same error.

    Any ideas?

  • SeeksSeeks Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    I'm not the best person to address this, but I can try to guess a few things. First though, I'm not sure if you mean BIOSs/Motherboards in general, or yours specifically, but I'm using over 500gb on my /home partition (ext4) and haven't had any issues at all.

    You might try booting from a live cd/ thumb drive and running either 'fschk' or 'fsck' on the partition and seeing what it spits out. I've never done so manually, but it sounds like a simple enough procedure.

    userbar.jpg
    desura_Userbar.png
  • Apothe0sisApothe0sis Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Tamin wrote: »
    So I think I need some help here.

    The video card for my linux box has been intermittent for a few months now, so I've been connecting to it using putty. Earlier today, I was copying some videos from my windows 7 box to it via smbclient.

    The transfer seemed to be taking too long, so I opened another putty session to check the status - putty wouldn't connect. Tried to ping it, and got no response. A few power cycles (resets and full on/off) failed to accomplish anything.

    Grumbling, I located and installed the video card to see where the boot was failing.
    error: Unknown filesystem
    grub rescue >
    

    None of the commands beyond 'ls' seem to be available. ls does bring up hd0, hd0,1, and hd0,5. A further ls hd0 gives the same error: Unknown filesystem.

    Some cursory research brought up the idea that the motherboard or bios might not recognize a drive if the space used is more than 137 gigabytes. Since this happened just after copying files over, I plugged the drive into my primary computer, and received the same error.

    Any ideas?
    I suggest performing the diagnostics I tried here. While it did absolutely nothing to fix things it made it clear that everything had gone to hell, which is a good place to start checking.

    What I see sees me.
    SODOMISE INTOLERANCE
    Tide goes in. Tide goes out.
  • TaminTamin Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    All right. Ran those tests, and came up with
    Disk sda: 30401 cylinders, 255 heads, 63 sectors/track
    Warning: extended partition does not start at a cylinder boundary.
    DOS and Linux will interpret the contents differently.
    Units = cylinders of 8225280 bytes, blocks of 1024 bytes, counting from 0
    
       Device Boot Start     End   #cyls    #blocks   Id  System
         sda1   *      0+  29298-  29299- 235337728   83  Linux
         sda2      29298+  30401-   1103-   8858625    5  Extended
         sda3          0       -       0          0    0  Empty
         sda4          0       -       0          0    0  Empty
         sda5      29298+  30401-   1103-   8858624   82  Linux swap / Solaris
    

    Attempting to mount it generates "mount: /dev/sda already mounted or /home/ubuntu/temp_mount busy"
    Correspondingly, umount /dev/sda claims /dev/sda is not mounted.

    fsck /dev/sda1 finally gives me something. A long list of "Group descriptor <number> checksums is invalid". I have "fixed" this. Next, a little bit on inodes; an inode has zero dtime; some multiply-claimed blocks.

    Lacking red flags, I authorized the corrections, and it is now spitting out a very long list of numbers.

    ....

    Finally stopped and provided me with:
    /dev/sda1: 144576/14712832 files (0.1% non-contiguous), 2026463/58834432 blocks

    Fingers crossed, I'm going to try resetting now.


    edit:
    The linux drive is booting again! Thanks, guys.

    However, I am a hairsbreadth from throwing both computers out of the window. Windows now spits out an error during boot that I can't catch, and the clock is off by 5 hours. I just. don't. get it.

  • grouch993grouch993 Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    You would mount and umount each partition individually and not the entire container. But you know that right? My apologies for assuming not.

    The clock could be some local time zone/universal time zone setting. I have seen a few different ways that the clock is handled, from an environment variable to all these listed here

    Steam Profile Origin grouchiy
  • elliotw2elliotw2 Registered User
    edited May 2011
    Windows always has a broken clock if you're dualbooting. Tell Linux to store the hardware clock as localtime instead of UTC and it should work

    camo_sig2.pngXBL:Elliotw3|PSN:elliotw2
  • TaminTamin Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    grouch993 wrote: »
    You would mount and umount each partition individually and not the entire container. But you know that right? My apologies for assuming not.

    No, I did not. Or, perhaps I had forgotten. Thanks.

    The last time I had to mount a hard drive was when I was rescuing my laptop's (yay for lightning [yes, there was a surge protector]), and that was years ago.



    I won't be dualbooting going forward; this was just for getting things organized.

  • KaimakaKaimaka Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Does anyone have any views on experience with installing and running Ubuntu on Apple Mac hardware. I'm interested in a new laptop and decided I wanted a Macbook Pro. I have done some reading over at the Ubuntu Forums about using apple hardware and read some of the guides and things. I just felt like some input from PA linux users

    ps4crew2.gif
    Pokemon White 2 Friend Code: 0218 8869 0490
    3DS Friend code: 3093 8504 2352
  • electricitylikesmeelectricitylikesme Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Woo! Got my RocketRaid 2340 working on the newest Linux kernel.

    A very simple patch, though christ I read the exact changelogs a couple of times and no-one actually mentioned that a helper macro was added to fix the exact incompatibility.

    The Company: The CYOA game that anybody can join at any time - running now!
  • iTunesIsEviliTunesIsEvil Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Kaimaka wrote: »
    Does anyone have any views on experience with installing and running Ubuntu on Apple Mac hardware. I'm interested in a new laptop and decided I wanted a Macbook Pro. I have done some reading over at the Ubuntu Forums about using apple hardware and read some of the guides and things. I just felt like some input from PA linux users
    I've run Ubuntu on my Macbook (White Poly, Early '08, Macbook 4,1) and I currently run Arch. Install is really not that difficult (the Ubuntu guides are pretty good on this). Is there anything in particular you're wondering about?

    Really, the only big issue I have/had is the wireless. That's because my machine has a broadcom chipset though, which means pain and agony for me. Also, every linux distro I've tried does some weird stuff for lowering power-consumption while on battery, the wireless speeds drop to about a third of what they should be. I'm guessing that's more of Broadcom's awesome driver(s) though.

  • KaimakaKaimaka Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    After reading a few threads over at the ubuntu forums such as:

    EFI boot bricks Macbook Pro 5,4
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1743664 and

    How to install Ubuntu 9.04 on an Intel-based Mac laptop, by Richard Cavell v1.1.
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1192296

    I was wondering if anyone had any suggestions of things to absolutely avoid when trying linux on a Mac. Any minor problems I'm not worriend about cos I have been using Ubunut since about 2007 and am fine with breaking things, then researching then fixing them up - it's all part of the linux experience in my opinion. Something about totally breaking Apples boot-loader to the point of needing a Mac shop to fix under warranty that I read in one one those threads is want concerned me.

    Basically I don't mind spendng hours messing bout with ubuntu on Mac figuring stuff out I just don't want to break anything to the point I need someone other than myself to fix or tools an average joe does not have

    I have ready that there are various options for some types of bootloader to use and whatnot I was planning on just running Apples bootcamp and putting a Ubuntu disc in when it said it was time for the Windows disc I figured that would be a fairly harmless way of going, is that how any of you did it? or some special method designed for Macs nonstandard non BIOS booting thing

    ps4crew2.gif
    Pokemon White 2 Friend Code: 0218 8869 0490
    3DS Friend code: 3093 8504 2352
  • iTunesIsEviliTunesIsEvil Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    I would suggest using rEFIt rather than trying to just use the vanilla EFI for booting. Especially if you're dual booting. I'm assuming you do want to keep an OS X install and you're just looking to have the option to boot into either Ubuntu or OS X?

    Honestly, there's not much major to watch out for. Your iSight camera might be a bit of a pain, your wireless might be a bit of a pain, but there's very little that you've got to really OMGWTF watch out for.

    The weirdest thing is getting your initial partition setup correct, and getting the EFI partition-table in sync with what's physically on the HDD. That's pretty easy though if you follow the directions, and rEFIt will resync that partition table for you.

    Basically follow the Macbook/MacbookPro guides (like this: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/MacBookPro) and you should be fine. :)

  • electricitylikesmeelectricitylikesme Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Man, fuck Unity.

    I've tried I really have, but its a terrifically bad step backwards overall, even if it has a few good ideas in it (mostly being able to hit the super key and get a Windows 7 style search) + the improved launcher.

    Everything else is terrifically stupid and just difficult to use, and hidden behind hard to find options when it should be right the christ in front of you ("there are two ways to do this - which do you prefer?").

    The Company: The CYOA game that anybody can join at any time - running now!
  • Zilla360Zilla360 Spaaaace! In Space.Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Man, fuck Unity.

    I've tried I really have, but its a terrifically bad step backwards overall, even if it has a few good ideas in it (mostly being able to hit the super key and get a Windows 7 style search) + the improved launcher.

    Everything else is terrifically stupid and just difficult to use, and hidden behind hard to find options when it should be right the christ in front of you ("there are two ways to do this - which do you prefer?").
    Spoiler:

  • DritzDritz Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Meh Unity is ok. I don't understand why people complain about this stuff. You're using Linux, if you don't your desktop just try something else.

    There I was, 3DS: 2621-2671-9899 (Ekera), Wii U: LostCrescendo
  • elliotw2elliotw2 Registered User
    edited May 2011
    Dritz wrote: »
    Meh Unity is ok. I don't understand why people complain about this stuff. You're using Linux, if you don't your desktop just try something else.

    Well, it's important because it's the first thing a lot of new users see. If Unity is terrible, then that's how a lot of people are going to look at Linux for a long time.

    camo_sig2.pngXBL:Elliotw3|PSN:elliotw2
  • JasconiusJasconius sword criminal Flo-ridaRegistered User regular
    edited May 2011
    What's the verdict on this new Ubuntu?

    I've finally had enough forced Unix experience by way of OS X software development that I think I am ready to actually run Linux competently.

    My company is looking for a remote short term (3-6 mo) contractor with remarkable JS and CSS experience who has worked in a team environment at least once before. If you are or know someone who is, PM me for details.
  • elliotw2elliotw2 Registered User
    edited May 2011
    Jasconius wrote: »
    What's the verdict on this new Ubuntu?

    I've finally had enough forced Unix experience by way of OS X software development that I think I am ready to actually run Linux competently.

    As someone who has never liked GNOME, I say it's meh

    camo_sig2.pngXBL:Elliotw3|PSN:elliotw2
  • SeeksSeeks Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    It's not bad, honestly. It depends largely on personal preference, though 'power users' probably aren't going to see much more than a little compiz bling where their perfectly functional desktops used to be.

    Myself, I don't mind it. I actually kind of like it for laptops - the only reason I haven't installed it on my own is because I'm lazy and what I've got works just fine. I installed it on my sister's aging laptop (512mb ram, 1.6/1.8 ghz, can't remember), and it runs quite surprisingly well. She likes it a lot, though I should point out that she is not especially technically inclined and her previous OS was a copy of XP that's probably been on the laptop - with nary a reformat - since the day it left the factory.

    userbar.jpg
    desura_Userbar.png
  • DritzDritz Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    elliotw2 wrote: »
    Dritz wrote: »
    Meh Unity is ok. I don't understand why people complain about this stuff. You're using Linux, if you don't your desktop just try something else.

    Well, it's important because it's the first thing a lot of new users see. If Unity is terrible, then that's how a lot of people are going to look at Linux for a long time.

    If it's the first thing a new user see I imagine they would like it more than Gnome or KDE. Generally if you are posting in a thread such as this you aren't exactly equipped to judge how the normals would react to something.

    There I was, 3DS: 2621-2671-9899 (Ekera), Wii U: LostCrescendo
Sign In or Register to comment.