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Learning to art! [NSFW]

WIckedkarmaWIckedkarma AustinRegistered User regular
edited March 6 in Artist's Corner
Wickedkarma learns to art!

Decided I have lurked this area enough. Seeing all of the awesome work in here.. It just pushed me over the edge, I decided I was going to teach my self how to paint! Then I tried painting and realized I needed to learn to draw first hehe.

So, here is my first painting ( yes its still being worked on ) Acrylics on canvas paper.
still changing a few things and I am also doing a few other things on the side.

hellboy1.jpg

All comments welcome =)
I am thinking about getting some watercolor pencils and messing around with them because they seem pretty neat, anyone have any experience using them or recommend a good set?

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WIckedkarma on

Posts

  • m3nacem3nace Registered User regular
    edited November 2011
    You say you need to learn to draw?: Draw from life.
    The picture you have in your post doesn't gives us any idea of your skill level, so we can point out what you need to work on and where your successes are. So something that isn't using local colors only, less stylized (or at least your own style) and basically just something that we can actually comment on ;)
    Starting from the bottom is essential in doing art, so trying to stylize first and then take it from there is nuts. You have to create a basis for building upon and that's what life drawing is about, if you for example look at some of Picasso's early works his father had him do very naturalistic paintings and from that basis he ended up developing his own distinct stylistic 4dimensional approach. First learn the basics of drawing, proportions, lighting, color theory etc. and then from there you can start to stylize. Mind you this forum is mainly for critique and we sure hope you embrace it =)
    Also, I checked out your artblarg and saw some of your drawings but the lines were very hard to spot, so when uploading your drawings either A: increase contrast in Photoshop or Gimp or something, or B: just draw with a regular pencil.

    As for watercolor pencils: I've never been a big fan of them, they can however give a lot of color. I'd recommend starting out with just plain watercolor (good ones don't have to be expensive and they're certainly cheaper than buying a set of good watercolor pencils) and get the feel of that first.

    Cheers, hoping to see more of your stuff soon (fellow bprd fan here, creds for the tattoo!)

    m3nace on
    WIckedkarma
  • WIckedkarmaWIckedkarma AustinRegistered User regular
    I was planing on it, but then my secondary hard drive died mid post and I lost all my photos =(

    And yea I understand I need to start from the basics, which I will throw up some pics below of me drawing some of my toys ( Tachikoma and Buzzard from The Goon set), trying to get scale and outlines, and proportions down before I move on.
    Sorry for the image quality, I am a total noob when it comes to photography and playing with them in Gimp/Photoshop.

    Tachikoma
    Tachikoma.jpg

    Buzzard
    Buzzard2.jpg




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  • WIckedkarmaWIckedkarma AustinRegistered User regular
    edited March 6
    sketch dump inc!
    I have been doing quick sketches every night for a few months now. Decided to share a few of them here, any tips and crits are welcome and much appreciated! =).
    Frank.jpg
    Vin.jpg
    metroid.jpg
    Omar.jpg
    self.jpg
    Splicer.jpg
    Hitchcock.jpg

    WIckedkarma on
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  • FlayFlay Registered User regular
    It looks like you're working hard, that's really good to see!

    Unfortunately there isn't much critique I can give at the moment, because the best thing you can do is to keep that up. Some of your proportion and placement is off, but that's a skill that'll improve with time and experience. Your lines are a little fuzzy, so maybe you should experiment with different pencil grades. Right now it looks like you're using maybe a 2B or an HB pencil, but try maybe an H or an H2 and see if those work for you.

    And remember that drawing from life is always preferable to a photograph, even if you're just drawing a mug or an apple. Photos do the heavy lifting of flattening a 3D object in to 2D for you, where drawing from life puts that onus on you.

    WIckedkarmalyrium
  • WIckedkarmaWIckedkarma AustinRegistered User regular
    Thanks for the tips :) swung by my local art supply store (Jerry's artorama) picked up a clutch pencil and I am realllyy digging it. Snagged a 4h lead set and a 2b they were out of the others :( the 4h is super light can you suggest a darker one?
    I also found out they do a $5.00 live drawing night and also have free drawing classes which I fully plan on taking advantage of. :)

    Started drawing my hand this was a quick piece about 7 mins tops done with the 2b lead. I am really happy with how it turned out.
    photo-1.JPG

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  • GrifterGrifter BermudaModerator mod
    I looks like you're having issues with drawing what you're actually seeing vs what you think you see. The faces appear skewed and a bit misshapen. I'd suggest checking out this book and doing the exercises in it.

    http://www.amazon.ca/The-Drawing-Right-Side-Brain/dp/0874774241

  • WIckedkarmaWIckedkarma AustinRegistered User regular
    Thanks Grifter. I just recent got a slightly older version of that. Haven't had much of a chance to go over it yet though as work has been super crazy.

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  • lyriumlyrium Registered User regular
    Keep it up with the pencil and paper sketching, and drawing your other hand! If your 4H feels too light, then play more with the B range. H=hard, which means it won't leave as much graphite on the paper and so the marks are a lot lighter.

  • WIckedkarmaWIckedkarma AustinRegistered User regular
    edited March 6
    I picked up some Gnomon drawing DVDs last week, only skipped through one and hopefully I will pick up some really good lessons from them, I also hit up my first ever life drawing class here are the results.
    1 minute warmups
    photo-2.JPG
    2 minute pose
    photo-3.JPG
    5 minute pose in which I butchered her face among other things ( sorry awesome model!)
    photo-4.JPG
    5 minute pose
    photo(4).JPG
    10 minute pose
    photo(3).JPG
    45 min pose
    photo-5.JPG


    WIckedkarma on
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  • WIckedkarmaWIckedkarma AustinRegistered User regular
    edited March 8
    So, life happened and I quit drawing for a few years.

    I recently subbed to New Masters Academy and have really been focusing on drawing every day.
    Here is how I have been doing

    Life drawing 10 minute sketches at a local comic shop that does cosplay life drawing Sundays:

    9VAZg7p.jpg
    zrAia3R.jpg
    RPPIAMN.jpg


    Love Mike Mignolas art style been doing some drawings based entirely on his work:

    MNQ0KmA.jpg
    aehPHLW.jpg
    pgcPZT9.jpg
    5JNCtyF.jpg
    TJQO2lc.jpg

    I forget the artist name but I got one of his learn to draw books and was amazed with what I was able to do.
    kcmTzY4.jpg

    AAjnFZO.jpg


    John Constantine in my first ever attempt to do something with charcoal
    KE94znl.jpg

    Some 20 minute drawing form photo reference
    oDb0y5m.jpg
    [img][/img]fzzXTrx.jpg?1


    WIckedkarma on
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    give2me2
  • WIckedkarmaWIckedkarma AustinRegistered User regular
    edited March 8
    Here is mt sketchbook from Month 1 of me really focusing on getting the basics down.
    Fair warning pics are big cause I have no idea what I'm doing =)

    Shading
    7ToiqTG.jpg?1
    klhdcxy.jpg?1
    suVo4kq.jpg?1
    HcbtOR6.jpg?1
    v3dhHYy.jpg?1


    Cloth:

    depi7F4.jpg?1
    h9Nsjz5.jpg?1
    mD8mSFq.jpg?1


    Figure stuff
    a9vHJ0L.jpg?1
    jsxeMVj.jpg?1
    Os60hSn.jpg?1
    yclLB7K.jpg?1
    5QYyl3R.jpg?1
    y1eZSJN.jpg?1
    hIcgpDt.jpg?1
    qQJxVz5.jpg?1



    WIckedkarma on
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    give2me2
  • WIckedkarmaWIckedkarma AustinRegistered User regular
    edited March 8
    Ac90Cpq.jpg?1

    WIckedkarma on
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  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    Hey man. We do actually have some image size restrictions on the forum. Please link to images that are that large, or find a way to resize them. If you are taking pictures with your phone, the easy thing to do is turn your camera setting down. If you have a PC just download gimp or something and export your images as something smaller. It really helps us critique work if we can see it outside of spoilers and at a reasonable size.

    are you following any sort of instruction? An online course or a book?

  • WIckedkarmaWIckedkarma AustinRegistered User regular
    edited March 8
    Iruka wrote: »
    Hey man. We do actually have some image size restrictions on the forum. Please link to images that are that large, or find a way to resize them. If you are taking pictures with your phone, the easy thing to do is turn your camera setting down. If you have a PC just download gimp or something and export your images as something smaller. It really helps us critique work if we can see it outside of spoilers and at a reasonable size.

    are you following any sort of instruction? An online course or a book?

    Thanks, and my apologies. It should all be fixed. I was not paying attention to the photo sizes my bad! I was just uploading from my phone to imgur.

    As far as me following any instructions/course/book , Its not really a "class" but I am going through the Steve Huston gesture videos on New Masters Academy.

    WIckedkarma on
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  • Angel_of_BaconAngel_of_Bacon Moderator mod
    Good to see you cranking on the basics :^:

    Couple of things that stand out:

    You're pretty consistently shortening the legs and making the head too large on these Loomis mannequin figures. I'm sure he goes over these proportions in the book as well, but ones you want to commit to memory: normal, non-exaggerated people are generally 7 heads tall. The base of the crotch is halfway between the top of the head to the bottom of the feet. Therefore, distance between the top of the head and the base of the crotch is 3.5 heads. You can use your fingers to measure this stuff out and get the figures on point.

    (Aside on Loomis: there's a lot of valuable information in his book, but I always feel like while the mannequin figures he suggests are good for gesture and composition shorthand, they can be pretty confusing for beginners still wrapping their heads around the concept of drawing volumes in space. You may find it helpful to try these mannequin figures in a more George Bridgman approach for a bit, where the ribcage and pelvis are first described as simple boxes, rather than using the oval and 'double compact disc' shapes of Loomis- the reason I suggest this is because it provides and easier way to get a handle on looking at these structures as volumes in space with perspective, and at this point that may be a more helpful way to approach the issue.)

    Speaking of which, I think that construction- breaking the shape of objects down into simple boxes, cylinders, and spheres- is really what I would suggest you drill down on in improving your figure work currently. Right now your drawings have a lot of focus on the contour lines of an object, rather than the volumes that work to construct that object. This is where most people start off with drawing, but it means that the drawing is going to lack a sense of believability, that it feel like an object that exists in perspective in space. If you can break things down into those concrete volumes, the drawing will have a lot more solidity to it.

    This video (NSFW, probably) gives a more thorough and in depth description of what I'm talking about, and shows how to apply this principle in drawing. (Also, all the other videos this guy has are gold, so if you want some really solid drawing tutorials, there you go.)

    IrukaWIckedkarma
  • WIckedkarmaWIckedkarma AustinRegistered User regular
    Those figures were before I started really getting into the lessons on New Masters Academy.
    Steve Hustons videos really resonated with me and I saw an almost instant improvement after watching his videos.
    Here is an example.



    Thanks for the tips I completely agree and am taking it to heart =)

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  • WIckedkarmaWIckedkarma AustinRegistered User regular
    Took a break from drawing this week and started to learn stained glass ( copper foiling) and learning how to solder =). Did a nice little twitch stream with some really helpful folks and learn a ton.

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  • WIckedkarmaWIckedkarma AustinRegistered User regular
    Picked up the book of 100 hands and am going through it when I take a break from learning how to solder and do stained glass.

    First project is a success!
    sufRZU3.jpg?1

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  • Angel_of_BaconAngel_of_Bacon Moderator mod
    Picked up the book of 100 hands and am going through it when I take a break from learning how to solder and do stained glass.

    Probably should have said this before, but if you're going to study Bridgman, you probably want to get The Complete Guide To Drawing From Life- it's got all the Bridgman books on anatomy including 100 hands (I think he's got a book about light and shade that's missing) compiled into a single volume, it's reproduced at a larger size than the individual volumes- and it looks like you can get it from Amazon for like just 50 cents more than you'd pay for any one of the individual volumes, so it's a lot cheaper ultimately. So, if you've still got the receipt you might want to return 100 hands and pick this version up instead.

    http://www.amazon.com/Bridgmans-Complete-Guide-Drawing-Life/dp/1402766785

    WIckedkarmatynic
  • WIckedkarmaWIckedkarma AustinRegistered User regular
    Picked up the book of 100 hands and am going through it when I take a break from learning how to solder and do stained glass.

    Probably should have said this before, but if you're going to study Bridgman, you probably want to get The Complete Guide To Drawing From Life- it's got all the Bridgman books on anatomy including 100 hands (I think he's got a book about light and shade that's missing) compiled into a single volume, it's reproduced at a larger size than the individual volumes- and it looks like you can get it from Amazon for like just 50 cents more than you'd pay for any one of the individual volumes, so it's a lot cheaper ultimately. So, if you've still got the receipt you might want to return 100 hands and pick this version up instead.

    http://www.amazon.com/Bridgmans-Complete-Guide-Drawing-Life/dp/1402766785

    Thanks! I happened to pick up the book of 100 hands a few other nice anatomy and reference/perspective books form Half Price Books so I paid maybe 4 bucks for it?
    I really need to step up my hand game.
    1NB362f.jpg?1

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  • lyriumlyrium Registered User regular
    What AoB mentioned with regards to construction- building the form as a solid object in perspective- is extra important when approaching something as complicated as hands. It was the first thing that came to my mind as well while initially scrolling through your sketchbook images. Getting the general shapes correct will help you make sure it all feels like it is locking together, and that it isn't a bunch of lines that don't relate to each other as a functional whole. Good to see you building a foundation!

  • WIckedkarmaWIckedkarma AustinRegistered User regular
    @lyrium @Angel_of_Bacon Thank you for the video, I dont suppose either of you have any good planes of the human body sheets or happen to know any decent links to some basic form /joining exorcises ?

    I like the video but I am one of those people where I need to draw it like 4000 times, I am not really having much luck on finding decent practice sheets though =(.

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  • Angel_of_BaconAngel_of_Bacon Moderator mod
    edited March 24
    @WIckedkarma Not sure if I totally understand your request here, but the first thing that comes to mind are some examples from How to Draw the Marvel Way (also chucked in a renaissance-era Luca Cambiasi drawing). How to Draw the Marvel Way may sound remedial, but for its brevity gives a pretty solid rundown of construction principles.

    construction_examples.jpg

    I would add though that if what you're looking for is a ton of these guys to directly copy off of, it may be missing the point a bit. This type of construction is common enough that I'm sure you could find many examples of comic or animation artists using it in their process, but the value of these constructed figures are almost entirely in applying the principles they are conveying to actual figures- and maybe after a few pages of copies, I'd suggest you move on quickly towards doing just that.

    Go to a life drawing session or find some ref, and break down all that information that the real thing provides you, and draw how that figure would look as a simplified box-and-cylinders figure.*

    Only then do you get the real benefit of the exercise, because you're having to use your head to figure out how to do that, you need to figure out how to draw these basic volumes under any possible perspective in that process- if you are just copying pages, it's possible to learn how to duplicate those printed box figures perfectly, but not get anything useful for the trouble- since all you learned was how to replicate 2d lines on a 2d sheet of paper, rather than training in the critical thinking skill of how to break down a figure, or any other object, into 3d volumes. It's important you're getting the deeper point, rather than just the surface.


    And while there are many different artists that have different common construction methodologies they may use- Bridgman has his, Burne Hogarth has his, Loomis has his, Reilly has his Reilly Method, Asaro has his Asaro head plane, etc.- these are all great things to look up and study from, but what's actually going to be useful to you is not memorizing any one or all of those methods, so much as understanding why they are doing what they are doing in any given scenario- because how one breaks down the body into planes and volumes, depends greatly on the objective and circumstance, on what problem you are trying to solve with a particular figure at a particular stage, rather than any specific method. The basic idea of 'this object is complicated- I need to simplify it into volumes in order to draw it' is much more important than any one particular approach to it.

    It's also hard for any artist to thoroughly break down a full figure into a sufficiently granular to cover every scenario, so it's up to the individual artist to figure out how to apply the basic ideas at incremental levels, rather than having a formula that covers all possible bases.

    For example, if I were drawing a hand on a figure, I might start off by just putting a box where that hand would go, making sure that overall that shape made sense perspective-wise. As I developed the figure further, I might break that box down further into 3 boxes- one for the palm, one for the figures, one for the thumb. Developing further, I might break down the mass of the 4 fingers together into 3 boxes, to represent change of plane that happens as the knuckle bends. Developing further, I might break down each finger into a separate series of cylinders. Developing further, I might reintroduce some of those box-type corners into the knuckles, to emphasize the sharpness of the plane changes.

    Which single one step of these would usefully tell you the planes of the hand, the volumes of the hand? The answer is none of them- and all of them. No single one step fully represents the form of the hand, yet all of them provide useful tools to help me describe the hand. If the hand changed pose, I might approach the construction in a totally different way.

    This is why I threw in the application of the principle to a car and a gun up there as well- completely different objects, but mastering construction with a figure will allow you to apply it to any object; it's a critical thinking skill, rather one of simple rote memorization.

    There are plenty of resources that will break down the anatomy and proportions of drawing a figure (and the Loomis you have is certainly a very good resource for that information)- the principle of construction is about how you take that information, and giving you a tool with which you can apply that information in a drawing.


    *(Further exercises: Draw the same figure as your model/reference, but try to draw it from a different, imagined viewpoint. In developing a sense of perspective and volume, you should be able to draw that pose from any angle. Or, draw the same figure as if the pose was slightly altered, figuring out how the forms will turn in perspective. These sorts of exercises help to make sure you're gaining a critical understanding of volume and perspective, rather than merely copying what is in front of you. Developing that critical understanding (along with understanding anatomy, foreshortening, etc.) is what allows artists to start to be able to pull off convincingly believable wholly imagined figures.)

    Angel_of_Bacon on
    WIckedkarmalyriumLamp
  • give2me2give2me2 Registered User new member
    Such talented people on here!

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