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Books

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Posts

  • DakalDakal Registered User
    edited February 2008
    Senjutsu wrote: »
    Dakal wrote: »
    Also, has anyone read the book "the Crystalids" or something like that where the whole darn thing takes place in Newfoundland but they dont call it that and all the kids are psychic?

    I read that in high school. It was pretty good from what I can remember, at least compared to most of the rest of the crap on the curriculum.

    Same here... I believe I read it in about 3 days compared to 3 weeks with Shakespear... oh god I hate that fucker.

  • SenjutsuSenjutsu fiddy too Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Shakespear I liked fine.


    A Separate Peace was pretty much the worst thing since ass in a can

    Sarksus wrote: »
    I'm gonna get a PhD in incest.
  • Casual EddyCasual Eddy Fighting the War on String Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Reading Shakespeare is ok but I've never liked watching it on stage.

    75trafim7bi2.png
  • Charles KinboteCharles Kinbote Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    I am just a dystopian freak

    Brave New World, 1984, Clockwork Orange, I just love the context so much

    www.twitter.com/amazingwarlock
  • Regicid3Regicid3 Registered User
    edited February 2008
    my favorite high school books were 1984 and the great gatsby

    I didn't have a mindgasm over 1984. I just really liked how it was written.

    I ordered a copy on amazon for like 8 bucks, including shipping. It comes in about a week later and I'm reading it. A little more than half way through, I come across a receipt... a receipt from a book store about 10 minutes away from me.

    From 1996.

    creepy

  • Dublo7Dublo7 Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    I love Orwell.

    It's also funny, I think I love the No Country movie as much as I love the novel. That never, ever happens.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Regicid3Regicid3 Registered User
    edited February 2008
    I am just a dystopian freak

    Brave New World, 1984, Clockwork Orange, I just love the context so much

    Hey, me too.

    Let's make out.

    O_o

    I didn't know Clockwork was a book. I haven't seen the movie either, I've been meaning to though... O_o

  • Penguin IncarnatePenguin Incarnate King of Kafiristan Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Dakal wrote: »
    Same here... I believe I read it in about 3 days compared to 3 weeks with Shakespear... oh god I hate that fucker.

    You shut your whore mouth!

  • laughingfuzzballlaughingfuzzball Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Regicid3 wrote: »
    Of course I read 1984, I love that book. That was where I started. I didn't know Animal Farm was a dystopic novel. I'll have to check it out.

    It's not all that dystopic, more in line with the political theme. If you're looking for dystopia, pick up A Clockwork Orange, but make sure your copy has 21 chapters (not 20), especially if it's old and you're in the states.

  • Charles KinboteCharles Kinbote Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    what

    what

    clockwork is such a book

    www.twitter.com/amazingwarlock
  • Dublo7Dublo7 Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Clockwork is a great book. So is the movie.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • laughingfuzzballlaughingfuzzball Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Regicid3 wrote: »
    I am just a dystopian freak

    Brave New World, 1984, Clockwork Orange, I just love the context so much

    Hey, me too.

    Let's make out.

    O_o

    I didn't know Clockwork was a book. I haven't seen the movie either, I've been meaning to though... O_o

    This is one of those cases where it's definately better to read it first, then watch it. I did it the other way round, and it wasn't as good as it could have been.

  • laughingfuzzballlaughingfuzzball Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Dakal wrote: »
    I honestly forget what Animal Farm's message was... It's been so long since I read it.
    Spoiler:

  • L|amaL|ama Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Animal Farm is an allegory of Stalin's transition to power in russia fuck nosebleed
    Spoiler:

  • laughingfuzzballlaughingfuzzball Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    L|ama wrote: »
    Animal Farm is an allegory of Stalin's transition to power in russia fuck nosebleed

    Yeah, but I don't expect some random guy at work to get that. I DO expect a reasonable, literate adult to get
    Spoiler:
    out of there.

  • Charles KinboteCharles Kinbote Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Animal Farm is without a doubt the single most brilliant satire of a political ideology since the works of Jonathon Swift

    www.twitter.com/amazingwarlock
  • StraightziStraightzi The rock, the vulture, and the chain All that the proud can feel of painRegistered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Anthony Burgess is probably my favorite author. If you liked A Clockwork Orange, do yourself a favor and pick up The wanting Seed. It is probably better, and it is still hella dystopia if you are digging that.

  • DakalDakal Registered User
    edited February 2008
    Thats a pretty straightforward message. I vaguely remember it being about those in power always wanting more/ abusing the power as well. Thus, demeaning the working class and causing problems for all...

    humm... sounds a lot like the current Gov't in the US of A.

  • Penguin IncarnatePenguin Incarnate King of Kafiristan Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Goddamn. I suddenly got a craving for an Irish baby.

  • StraightziStraightzi The rock, the vulture, and the chain All that the proud can feel of painRegistered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Dakal wrote: »
    Thats a pretty straightforward message. I vaguely remember it being about those in power always wanting more/ abusing the power as well. Thus, demeaning the working class and causing problems for all...

    Yes that is Soviet Russia for you when Stalin takes power.

  • laughingfuzzballlaughingfuzzball Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    I will agree with you there, Shank. It's just not all that great if you read it as pure fiction. It pretty much only works as satire.

    1984, however, makes a good political read, a good character drama, a good pulp-ish sci-fi, and so on. It covers pretty much any genre I'm likely to be in the mood for at any given moment, and covers them all well.

  • L|amaL|ama Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    I like Brave New World as a counterpoint(?) to 1984, and possibly a more realistic one, but the story itself and the writing leave a lot to be desired.

  • Me Too!Me Too! __BANNED USERS regular
    edited February 2008
    I loved Animal Farm. It's probably one of my favorite books.
    I've almost finished Crooked Little Vein already. Are there any other books like this out there?

  • The Far SideThe Far Side __BANNED USERS regular
    edited February 2008
    orwell is my favourite democratic socialist

    33aqfwk.jpg
  • Charles KinboteCharles Kinbote Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    well I also kinda feel like Gulliver's Travels is not at all an interesting read if one doesn't know about 19th century Britain

    I am not disagreeing with you, and I don't want you to quote my post saying "Yeah, but" because I am in complete agreement with you, but I think satires are the only popular form of fiction able to say "if you don't know the context, don't judge the book"

    also I think vonnegut is my favorite author. He doesn't really depict dystopian societies much (I mean, Cat's Cradle and your personal opinion about modern-day America aside) but there's still something significantly dystopian about his settings and prose.

    www.twitter.com/amazingwarlock
  • BusterKBusterK Negativity is Boring Cynicism is Cowardice Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    My favorite dystopian novel

    0140441654.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg

    Visit http://www.cruzflores.com for all your Cruz Flores needs. Also listen to the podcast I do with Penguin Incarnate http://wgsgshow.podomatic.com
    Amazon Wishlist: http://www.amazon.com/BusterK/wishlist/3JPEKJGX9G54I/ref=cm_wl_search_bin_1
  • Charles KinboteCharles Kinbote Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    god I am not a fan of that book

    I just read paradise lost and jesus christ fuck that book

    www.twitter.com/amazingwarlock
  • laughingfuzzballlaughingfuzzball Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    well I also kinda feel like Gulliver's Travels is not at all an interesting read if one doesn't know about 19th century Britain

    I am not disagreeing with you, and I don't want you to quote my post saying "Yeah, but" because I am in complete agreement with you, but I think satires are the only popular form of fiction able to say "if you don't know the context, don't judge the book"

    also I think vonnegut is my favorite author. He doesn't really depict dystopian societies much (I mean, Cat's Cradle and your personal opinion about modern-day America aside) but there's still something significantly dystopian about his settings and prose.

    My Junior-year Lit class is a perfect example of that. Most of them didn't get Proposal at all. The handful of us who already knew the background (how bad is it when your a lit geek relative to an honors lit class?) played on their perceptions for a while in the 'open discussion' period. This was during the height of the 'dead baby joke' fad, and we had the 'dead baby joke' king in our class. It was pretty hilarious. Then the teacher explained it, and they probably forgot about it by next week.

  • The Far SideThe Far Side __BANNED USERS regular
    edited February 2008
    BusterK wrote: »
    My favorite dystopian novel

    0140441654.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg
    i love you

    33aqfwk.jpg
  • Charles KinboteCharles Kinbote Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    that's such a bad book

    I mean I understand that it is either brilliant satire or depressingly retarded views on socioeconomic conduct

    but that doesn't forgive tiresome prose and and overall bland way of expressing ideas

    www.twitter.com/amazingwarlock
  • BusterKBusterK Negativity is Boring Cynicism is Cowardice Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    We read Utopia and The Prince in my Senior English Seminar
    I enjoyed comparing the two and explaining why I thought being a succesful tyrant and running "Utopia" were actually the same thing.

    Visit http://www.cruzflores.com for all your Cruz Flores needs. Also listen to the podcast I do with Penguin Incarnate http://wgsgshow.podomatic.com
    Amazon Wishlist: http://www.amazon.com/BusterK/wishlist/3JPEKJGX9G54I/ref=cm_wl_search_bin_1
  • laughingfuzzballlaughingfuzzball Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    I've never read Utopia, but I've read summaries and references and the like.

    None of them really make me want to slog through 200 pages of high-styled archaic English. It's fun in small doses, but it's got to be really good for me to bother getting into that 'mode', ya know?

  • OrikaeshigitaeOrikaeshigitae Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited February 2008
    BusterK wrote: »
    My favorite dystopian novel

    0140441654.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg
    i love you

    what the fuck is wrong with you

    utopia is one of the worst dystopian novels ever, it is SO BORING

    it's like 200 pages of Goldstein's memoirs section in 1984

    We by Yvegeny Zamyatin is at least the template for 1984, go read that


    also:

    i just got the amazing adventures of kavalier and clay, and i read 200 pages in one sitting, then went and wrote until i realized how thin my dog was and how he's probably going to die soon

  • AnexionAnexion Registered User
    edited February 2008
    Suppose this as good a first post as any, but good lord how can you not like paradise lost? I thought it was the best representation of Satan Id ever read.

    And maybe it was just the atheist in me reading into it but I found it to be somewhat sympathetic to him as well which I enjoyed.

  • Charles KinboteCharles Kinbote Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    thank you orik

    www.twitter.com/amazingwarlock
  • AnexionAnexion Registered User
    edited February 2008
    well I also kinda feel like Gulliver's Travels is not at all an interesting read if one doesn't know about 19th century Britain.

    Yeah I am rereading this now after reading it in high school, and I was not so good at picking up on this back then apparently

  • The Far SideThe Far Side __BANNED USERS regular
    edited February 2008
    BusterK wrote: »
    My favorite dystopian novel

    0140441654.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg
    i love you

    what the fuck is wrong with you

    utopia is one of the worst dystopian novels ever, it is SO BORING

    it's like 200 pages of Goldstein's memoirs section in 1984

    We by Yvegeny Zamyatin is at least the template for 1984, go read that


    also:

    i just got the amazing adventures of kavalier and clay, and i read 200 pages in one sitting, then went and wrote until i realized how thin my dog was and how he's probably going to die soon
    no no i realise its a terrible book but the reference made me laugh

    33aqfwk.jpg
  • OrikaeshigitaeOrikaeshigitae Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited February 2008
    penguin classics has sweet covers, i have to say

  • Charles KinboteCharles Kinbote Registered User regular
    edited February 2008
    Anexion wrote: »
    Suppose this as good a first post as any, but good lord how can you not like paradise lost? I thought it was the best representation of Satan Id ever read.

    And maybe it was just the atheist in me reading into it but I found it to be somewhat sympathetic to him as well which I enjoyed.

    maybe it was the shitty prose, the godawful development, the terrible, caricatures the author tries to pass off as "characters" and the fucking moronic hypocrisy in the actions of the aforementioned caricatures

    maybe it is the fact that it is the douchey epic for the person who does not know what they are talking about or how an epic should legitimately be written because never have I seen a book by which I am so convinced that an author is writing with the sole purpose of parodying an entire language

    www.twitter.com/amazingwarlock
  • AnexionAnexion Registered User
    edited February 2008
    I admit there were parts where it just dragged on, but I think there were well written sections too. Satans speach to the fallen angels for the classic example.

    The god character in that book pissed me off so much though.

    Also I took one of the suggestions from this thread and started Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell by Susannah Clarke

    I am enjoying it very much so far, so thanks for that!

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