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Butt rips in jeans

RaneadosRaneados Registered User regular
edited May 2008 in Help / Advice Forum
Quite a number of my jeans have giant ass rips in them. All the fabric is still there, it just ripped (I used to work a maintenance job)

I know there are heavy gauge, thick threads out there, but I'd like to know what I'm looking for before I toddle down to the fabric store.

What should i look for in a way to CHEAPLY sew up jeans?

Raneados on
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Posts

  • WillethWilleth Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Shit, while we're at it:

    I ride a bike six miles every day. How do I prevent crotch rip?

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  • The CatThe Cat Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited May 2008
    jeans need to be patched (well, anything with that kind of rip needs to be patched because the weave won't be able to hold the thread for long), but honestly you may as well just get a new pair. Jeans wear out eventually. At best, take them to a tailor. They'll do a good job for not much.

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  • SzechuanosaurusSzechuanosaurus Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited May 2008
    I find properly fitting jeans helps avoid this. Jeans that are too baggy in the crotch seem more prone to getting into a ripable position, even if you aren't doing anything particularly strenuous. They seem to kind of try to span the gap between your thighs like a thin layer of skin and the slightest wrong move can stretch them enough to pull them apart. I've lost some really good quality jeans just because they were a bit too baggy around the balls.

    But yeah. You want to patch, not just sew. Or wear denim coloured boxers.

  • tsmvengytsmvengy Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    But yeah. You want to patch, not just sew. Or wear denim coloured boxers.

    This.

    OK, not really. Just buy some new jeans - they're pretty cheap. Unless you really like the look of ass-patches.

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  • wakeboarderbluntwakeboarderblunt Registered User
    edited May 2008
    have you guys ever sat down in a chair and caught your pocket on the arm rest? Ive ripped (3) pairs of pants that way.

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  • SageinaRageSageinaRage Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Yeah, getting good fitting jeans will help a lot. If they're too baggy in the crotch or legs, then they will catch on your knees and legs when kneeling, and won't move along with the contour of the leg as well.

  • denihilistdenihilist tiny, tiny little man live music capitol of the worldRegistered User, Moderator mod
    edited May 2008
    Raneados wrote: »
    Quite a number of my jeans have giant ass rips in them. All the fabric is still there, it just ripped (I used to work a maintenance job)

    I know there are heavy gauge, thick threads out there, but I'd like to know what I'm looking for before I toddle down to the fabric store.

    What should i look for in a way to CHEAPLY sew up jeans?
    You can cheaply sew up your jeans with anything. I've seen people fix holes with dental floss, it's just a matter of style. The main thing to remember is that you need to reinforce the area and sew through the patch for strength.

    This is probably overkill for you but you can simplify from there.
    Willeth wrote: »
    Shit, while we're at it:

    I ride a bike six miles every day. How do I prevent crotch rip?
    Proper fit is really important. Too tight and you stress the seams. "Sagging" causes you to stress the seams as well. You want a jean with a decent rise and you need to pay attention to where the crotch seams rest. Self Edge put out a "Cycling Jean" a few months ago but it's probably sold out and you would probably think it was crazy expensive.

    Dirt and sweat weaken the fabric so wash frequently. You can tell where you're going to get a hole/rip so watch for the material to show the signs and patch BEFORE the hole actually shows.

  • EggyToastEggyToast Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    If you're making a small patch, you darn the hole (which is just stitching it up). If there's a larger hole, you'll simply get a piece of fabric to patch it. It's up to you how you want that to look -- you can either match the color, or get an obviously different color. You may even want to patch the other side just for looks.

    You can just use the cheapest thread out there; the strength comes from the stitching, and if you're patching it yourself you can always just restitch it if some come loose.

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  • KalTorakKalTorak Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    But yeah. You want to patch, not just sew. Or wear denim coloured boxers.

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  • ZonkytonkmanZonkytonkman Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    my jeans dont so much tear as wear thin in the crotch region. Probably something to do with my thunder thighs. Is this the case for you?

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  • k1DBLITZk1DBLITZ Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    I know this may sound weird, but I've found that black jeans last MUCH longer than "blue" jeans.

    Blue jeans always get that hole in the top corner of the back pocket.

    I have a pair of levi's silver tab black jeans that are literally over a decade old, no holes in the back pocket.

    I also vaguely remember seeing commercials for those "buddy lee" jeans that are supposed to be really tough/strong.

  • DocDoc Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited May 2008
    Willeth wrote: »
    Shit, while we're at it:

    I ride a bike six miles every day. How do I prevent crotch rip?

    Get bike pants. Spandex/neoprene ain't my thing, so I use mountain bike pants. They have the standard bike shorts as a lining for cargo pants. It works well for me.

  • denihilistdenihilist tiny, tiny little man live music capitol of the worldRegistered User, Moderator mod
    edited May 2008
    k1DBLITZ wrote: »
    I know this may sound weird, but I've found that black jeans last MUCH longer than "blue" jeans.

    Blue jeans always get that hole in the top corner of the back pocket.

    I have a pair of levi's silver tab black jeans that are literally over a decade old, no holes in the back pocket.

    I also vaguely remember seeing commercials for those "buddy lee" jeans that are supposed to be really tough/strong.
    The color of the dye has nothing to do with the durability of the fabric.

  • TrowizillaTrowizilla Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    If the fabric isn't too worn, you can just stitch up the rips normally. Make sure you place your stitches a little bit back from the hole so you're not stitching through the "fringe" bits. Use a lot of small stitches and you should be able to get a lot of wear out of them before you rip them again.

  • Regina FongRegina Fong Allons-y, Alonso Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    denihilist wrote: »
    k1DBLITZ wrote: »
    I know this may sound weird, but I've found that black jeans last MUCH longer than "blue" jeans.

    Blue jeans always get that hole in the top corner of the back pocket.

    I have a pair of levi's silver tab black jeans that are literally over a decade old, no holes in the back pocket.

    I also vaguely remember seeing commercials for those "buddy lee" jeans that are supposed to be really tough/strong.
    The color of the dye has nothing to do with the durability of the fabric.

    True, but the acid/stone washing process used to create some blue jeans with a pre-faded, "rustic", or broken-in look can substantially weaken the fabric.

  • LewieP's MummyLewieP's Mummy Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Buy iron on denim patches, iron on the inside of the jeans, then stitch around the rip, through the jeans and the iron on parch. if you just sew a rip together, its liable to give again, if you just use the iron on patch, the jeans fabric will pull off them.

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  • BedlamBedlam Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    I always toss them if they are ripped in the seat. Mostly because I dont want them ripping again while I am in public, and it is pretty certain that they will rip again sometime.

  • bodiemabodiema Registered User
    edited May 2008
    Perhaps this could help you with patching technique. It includes pictures but is translated from Japanese so a bit difficult to understand at parts.

    http://web.archive.org/web/20060217005245/www.45rpm.jp/denim/detail.jsp?id=011&lang=en

  • RaneadosRaneados Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    well, the rips are very very clean and there's no fraying so I scooted down and found some denim and jean twine.

    I'll give it a shot later and will find out what's up with it

    Dubh wrote: »
    Rane is the future of ancient greek tradition
  • denihilistdenihilist tiny, tiny little man live music capitol of the worldRegistered User, Moderator mod
    edited May 2008
    jeepguy wrote: »
    denihilist wrote: »
    k1DBLITZ wrote: »
    I know this may sound weird, but I've found that black jeans last MUCH longer than "blue" jeans.

    Blue jeans always get that hole in the top corner of the back pocket.

    I have a pair of levi's silver tab black jeans that are literally over a decade old, no holes in the back pocket.

    I also vaguely remember seeing commercials for those "buddy lee" jeans that are supposed to be really tough/strong.
    The color of the dye has nothing to do with the durability of the fabric.

    True, but the acid/stone washing process used to create some blue jeans with a pre-faded, "rustic", or broken-in look can substantially weaken the fabric.
    Oh, fair point. I don't buy pre-washed jeans so I didn't think about that.

  • DaenrisDaenris Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    denihilist wrote: »
    jeepguy wrote: »
    denihilist wrote: »
    k1DBLITZ wrote: »
    I know this may sound weird, but I've found that black jeans last MUCH longer than "blue" jeans.

    Blue jeans always get that hole in the top corner of the back pocket.

    I have a pair of levi's silver tab black jeans that are literally over a decade old, no holes in the back pocket.

    I also vaguely remember seeing commercials for those "buddy lee" jeans that are supposed to be really tough/strong.
    The color of the dye has nothing to do with the durability of the fabric.

    True, but the acid/stone washing process used to create some blue jeans with a pre-faded, "rustic", or broken-in look can substantially weaken the fabric.
    Oh, fair point. I don't buy pre-washed jeans so I didn't think about that.

    Another possible reason for this is simply preference. Sure, I have some black jeans that lasted ridiculously longer than some blue jeans I have. In my case I know exactly why though. I wear the blue jeans probably 10-15 times for every time I wear the black jeans. So the black jeans may last 10-15 times longer and seem to be higher quality, even though they're not. Just a thought.

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