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Pie

VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User
edited October 2008 in Help / Advice Forum
So I want to bake a pie this weekend to celebrate the boy getting a new job. I do a mean pecan pie but I want to try something new. I'm thinking of doing a cherry pie but I don't actually know anyone whose ever made or ate cherry pie. I don't trust baking recipes I find online as there isn't any real way to know if they're any good and baking can easily go awry. So I'm looking for a good cherry pie recipe or any good pie recipe for that matter, I'm open to suggestions.

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Posts

  • NotASenatorNotASenator Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    How much lead time do you need for shopping?

    My mom makes a mean cherry pie, but I'd have to get in touch with her and get her to email me the recipe.

  • ImprovoloneImprovolone Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    The recipies on FoodNetwork.com are safe/tasty as long as they are by on of the Network chefs or have a high rating.

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  • VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User
    edited October 2008
    NotACrook wrote: »
    How much lead time do you need for shopping?

    My mom makes a mean cherry pie, but I'd have to get in touch with her and get her to email me the recipe.

    Not a lot of time. I can go shopping anytime this weekend and I can bake it anytime between tomorrow and Sunday.

  • NotASenatorNotASenator Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    For a fellow skeptic, I sent her an email. Hopefully she's around.

  • VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User
    edited October 2008
    NotACrook wrote: »
    For a fellow skeptic, I sent her an email. Hopefully she's around.

    Thanks! I really want to do a cherry pie and you can never go wrong with a mom recipe.

  • RUNN1NGMANRUNN1NGMAN Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    Compliments of Cook's Illustrated, which is about as close to a peer-reviewed cooking magazine as there is...

    Makes one 9-inch pie, serving 6 to 8. Published July 1, 1995.

    The amount of sugar and tapioca you use is relative, depending on the fruit’s quality and your taste. If you prefer a less sweet pie or if the fruit is especially sweet, use the lower sugar amount. If you like your pie juices fairly thick, or if the fruit is really juicy, then opt for the higher amount of tapioca. If you are using frozen fruit, measure it frozen, but let it thaw before filling the pie. If not, you run the risk of partially cooked fruit and undissolved tapioca. If using sour cherries instead of sweet, increase sugar to 1 cup and tapioca to 4 tablespoons.

    INGREDIENTS
    Pie Dough
    2 1/4 cups unbleached all-purpose flour , plus extra for dusting
    1 teaspoon table salt
    2 tablespoons granulated sugar
    11 tablespoons unsalted butter , cut into 1/4-inch cubes
    7 tablespoons vegetable shortening , chilled
    1/3 cup water , chilled with ice, increasing up to 3/8 cup, if needed
    Cherry Filling
    6 cups sweet cherries (pitted), or 6 cups pitted frozen cherries
    3/4 cup granulated sugar
    1 small lemon , zested to yield 1 teaspoon zest and juiced to yield 2 teaspoons juice
    1/8 teaspoon ground allspice
    1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    1/8 teaspoon almond extract
    1 tablespoon brandy
    3–4 tablespoons quick-cooking tapioca
    2 tablespoons unsalted butter , cut into small pieces
    INSTRUCTIONS
    1. Mix flour, salt, and sugar in food processor fitted with steel blade. Scatter butter pieces over flour mixture, tossing to coat butter with a little flour. Cut butter into flour with five 1-second pulses. Add shortening and continue to cut it in until flour is pale yellow and resembles coarse cornmeal with butter bits no larger than small peas, about four more 1-second pulses. Turn mixture into medium bowl.

    2. Sprinkle all but 1 tablespoon of the ice water over mixture. With blade of rubber spatula, use folding motion to mix. Press down on dough with broad side of spatula until dough sticks together, adding up to 1 tablespoon of remaining ice water if dough does not come together. Divide dough into two balls, one slightly larger than the other. Flatten each into 4-inch-wide disk. Dust lightly with flour, wrap separately in plastic, and refrigerate at least 30 minutes.

    3. Remove dough from refrigerator; let stand at room temperature to soften slightly, about 10 minutes. Heat oven to 400 degrees. Toss fruit with sugar, lemon juice and zest, spices, almond extract, brandy, and tapioca; let stand for 15 minutes.

    4. Roll larger dough disk on lightly floured surface into 12-inch circle, about 1/8-inch thick. Transfer and fit dough into 9-inch Pyrex pie pan, leaving dough that overhangs the lip in place. Turn fruit mixture, including juices, into pie shell. Scatter butter pieces over fruit. Refrigerate until ready to top with remaining dough.

    5. Roll smaller disk on lightly floured surface into 10-inch circle. Lay over fruit. Trim top and bottom dough edges to 1/2-inch beyond pan lip. Tuck this rim of dough underneath itself so that folded edge is flush with pan lip. Flute dough in your own fashion, or press with fork tines to seal. Cut four slits at right angles on dough top to allow steam to escape. If pie dough is very soft, place in freezer for 10 minutes before baking.

    6. Place pie on baking sheet; bake until top crust is golden, 20 to 25 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 350 degrees and continue to bake until juices bubble and crust is golden brown, 30 to 40 minutes longer.

    7. Transfer pie to wire rack; let cool to almost room temperature so juices have time to thicken, from 1 to 2 hours.

  • NotASenatorNotASenator Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    well, that seems like a fantastic answer there, but for completeness my mom said that since she doesn't know how much cooking you do, just to get a pre-made crust and a can of cherry pie filling and follow the directions on the can.

    I gave her an infraction via email.

  • mrcheesypantsmrcheesypants Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    I don't know much about baking, but here's a recipe from Joy of Cooking if you need a backup (slightly edited where it says "refer to page x for instructions"):
    Joy wrote:
    Fresh Cherry Pie
    One 9-inch double-crust pie

    Tart cherries make the best pie, but ripe Bing cherries will certainly do.
    <make some dough, book says to see the dough recipes but I'll assume that you can make dough>

    Line a 9-inch pan with half the dough. Position a rack in the lower third of the oven. Preheat the oven to 425F. Combine in a bowl and let stand for 15 minutes:
    • 5 cups pitted sour or Bing cherries (2 to 2 1/2 pounds)
    • 1 1/4 cups sugar for sour cherries, 3/4 cup for Bing cherries
    • 3 to 3 1/2 tablespoons quick-cooking tapioca or cornstarch
    • 2 tablespoons water
    • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
    • (1/4 teaspoon almond extract)

    Pour the mixutre into the bottom crust and dot with:
    2 to 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into small pieces[/b[
    Cover with a pricked or vented top crust or a lattice. Bake at 30 min to set the crust then about 30 min at a moderate temperature to cook the filling. Do not declare a pie done until it's brown on top like that of a hazlenutshell.

    Hope that helps.

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  • VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User
    edited October 2008
    I do a lot of baking so I'm going to do the crust from scratch too.

  • LewieP's MummyLewieP's Mummy Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    I love lemon meringue pie - pastry crust, no lid, lemon filling made with fresh lemons and zest, with just a bit of sugar, then soft, flash baked meringue, with enough sugar in it to form beads of caramel on the surface. Mmmmm

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  • RipsawRipsaw Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    I would go with apples. Cherry season has come and gone.
    Cinnamon, brown sugar, and a bit of lemon.

  • shugaraeshugarae Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    I second the apple pie. Apple pies are super easy - cinnamon, sugar (white and/or brown), a little nutmeg, cornstarch (to thicken the juice), lemon juice (mostly to keep the apples looking good).

    Put it in the pie crust and voila - pie.

    If you're feeling a little more adventurous, pull the pie out of the oven with about 10 mins left and spoon whipped cream into the holes on top. Put it back in the oven for the last 10 mins and it's done. This just adds another layer of yummy sweetness to it :D

    Oh yeah, uh, warm apple pie + ice cream = best dessert ever.

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  • VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User
    edited October 2008
    My mom has good recipes for apple and english apple pie and an apple crumbcake but I'm not sure I want to go apple. She also has a good one for blueberry peach but I hate out of season blueberries.

  • ImprovoloneImprovolone Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    What's an English Apple pie?
    Also, do you think you could post those recipies for all of us pie loving PAers?

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  • VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User
    edited October 2008
    What's an English Apple pie?
    Also, do you think you could post those recipies for all of us pie loving PAers?

    English apple pie has pecans. When I talk to my mom tomorrow I'll get the recipes. She's making the apple crumbcake tonight actually.

  • ImprovoloneImprovolone Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    That sounds delicious. I was fearful it was something missleading like a yorkshire pudding.

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  • PirateJonPirateJon Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    apple pie is good; apple pie with cranberries, a shot of bourbon, and a little 5-spice powder is godly.

    also - do not skip the 'Scatter butter pieces over fruit' mentioned in that cooks illustrated recipe. You'll be surprised at the added flavor.

    all perfectionists are mediocre in their own eyes
  • ben0207ben0207 Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    What's an English Apple pie?
    Also, do you think you could post those recipies for all of us pie loving PAers?

    English apple pie has pecans. When I talk to my mom tomorrow I'll get the recipes. She's making the apple crumbcake tonight actually.
    Bollocks does it. At least, Apple Pie made in England doesn't.

    Try an Apple Crumble. Not strictly a pie, but easy as shit and awesome. The BBc has an awesome recipe, but use less sugar than they say as their recipe is a trifle sweet.

  • SporkAndrewSporkAndrew Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited October 2008
    English apple pie has pecans. When I talk to my mom tomorrow I'll get the recipes. She's making the apple crumbcake tonight actually.

    No it doesn't.

    English apple pie has no fucking cinnamon because that stuff is foul and I will never understand why everything American has it in.

  • EggyToastEggyToast Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    Cinnamon is a spice of the gods. I even put it in my chilli. You sound like my German friend, who hates peanut butter.

    For pie, my wife handles baking stuff (she got into it since I do the rest of the cooking) and even though she's able to make her own crusts easily, she generally just buys pre-made crusts. They're not all that different from home-made, and they're much much much easier to work with thanks to the lack of rolling. Not everything has to be homemade -- for example, "box cake" still has flour, sugar, all the regular cake ingredients; they're just mixed up already so you know it'll taste good (and work).

    The key to a good cherry pie, IMO, is the tartness. Good cherries are expensive, though, and canned ones are typically over-sweet. Although I prefer cherries, when it comes to cost & availability I typically stick with strawberry&rhubarb pies.

    Pies overall are easy, though -- chop or slice the "guts," mix a portion of flour & sugar (or sometimes tapioca) in with the bits, let it sit for about 30 minutes, and then gloop it into the crust. The tricky part is figuring out just how much sugar & thickener you need, depending on how sweet or thick you like it.

    Unfortunately, my rule of thumb for cooking for someone else doesn't help you: make it once to test it out, then when you make it the 2nd time you know what to do differently to make it even better.

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  • VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User
    edited October 2008
    Well my mom's Englsih Apple Pie recipe has pecans. The other recipes I've seen have used things such as rasins as well. I have yet to see one without cinnamon though.

  • VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User
    edited October 2008
    EggyToast wrote: »
    Unfortunately, my rule of thumb for cooking for someone else doesn't help you: make it once to test it out, then when you make it the 2nd time you know what to do differently to make it even better.

    I used to do this but then found I often ended up with just two really good pies. Which doesn't sound like such a bad thing until you're eating pecan pie for 7 days in a row.

  • CauldCauld Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    I like blueberry pie, though I admit its not in season. How do you feel about cheesecakes? Or are you really set on making a fruit pie?

  • VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User
    edited October 2008
    I'd be game for cheesecake. I've never made it before and have been wanting to. I also wanted to do blueberry because it's the boy's favourite but I don't do out of season blueberries. I grew up spoiled in NJ with blueberries.

  • CauldCauld Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    You could always make a cheesecake base, with a fruit on top but I've never done that before.

  • VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User
    edited October 2008
    Ooo I like that idea.

  • LewieP's MummyLewieP's Mummy Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    ben0207 wrote: »
    English apple pie has pecans.

    Bollocks does it. At least, Apple Pie made in England doesn't.
    No it doesn't. English apple pie has no cinnamon.

    English apple pie has a pastry base, baking apples (peeled, cored, sliced) with sugar sprinkled over the sliced apples, then a lid of pastry on top, brushed with a mixture of beaten egg and milk, to make the top go brown, with a little sugar sprinkled on the top of the pastry.

    NOTHING ELSE!!!!!!!!!!!

    And apple crumble is peeled, cored, sliced apples placed in the base of an oven proof dish, sprinkled with sugar, then crumble mixture placed on top, then baked (crumble is self raising flour, sugar and butter in a ratio 2:2:1) til the top of the crumble mixture goes brown.

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  • VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User
    edited October 2008
    That sounds awfully blah and I think I'll stick with mine.

  • LewieP's MummyLewieP's Mummy Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    Its yummy!

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  • TrustTrust Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    Apple Crumble with custard is just amazing.

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  • VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User
    edited October 2008
    I dunno, I do love my pecans.

    And I do like the sound of apple crumb with custard. I wish I didn't miss apple picking season :(

  • EggyToastEggyToast Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    That sounds awfully blah and I think I'll stick with mine.

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  • GungHoGungHo Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    Key lime pie is easy to make. Except for the part where you're squeezing 18 key limes.

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  • VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User
    edited October 2008
    I've never had key lime pie. I'm not sure I would like it.

  • EriosErios Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    Steaming hot blueberry pie with lots of crust and a massive slab of vanilla ice cream sets my taste buds all aflutter.

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  • EggyToastEggyToast Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    Is this for you, or for him? Or both? Perhaps that should guide your tastes more. For instance, my wife loves blackberries and raspberries, but I'm indifferent to them.

    Key lime is pretty close to pudding in consistency, with a gelatin firmness to it. It's tart & creamy. It used to be my favorite pie when I was a kid, but I've since outgrown it.

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  • VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User
    edited October 2008
    It's for him and he pretty much likes all pie. I'd rather not make a pie I won't like, such as key lime, but I'd still make it and give it a try anyway.

  • EggyToastEggyToast Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    You guys inspired me and I made a cheesecake tonight. Actually 2, as the recipe in the Joy of Cooking makes a significant amount.

    Although it makes me wonder if most cheesecakes in bakeries are simple "no bake" recipes. Hmmm.

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  • VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User
    edited October 2008
    So in the end I pushed the pie back to this week, have decided on pumpkin and it's going to accompany the full stuffed chicken dinner I'm doing. Will post pie pictures later but here's recipe I'm using for the pie.
    Spoiler:

    I'm making the crust as well but my mother has swore me to secrecy on that recipe.

  • ImprovoloneImprovolone Registered User regular
    edited October 2008
    I made a very good cinnamon vanilla whipped cream the other day for a pumpkin pie.
    1 cup of whipping cream
    2 tablespoons powdered sugar
    1 teaspoon cinnamon
    1 teaspoon vanilla

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