Our new Indie Games subforum is now open for business in G&T. Go and check it out, you might land a code for a free game. If you're developing an indie game and want to post about it, follow these directions. If you don't, he'll break your legs! Hahaha! Seriously though.
Our rules have been updated and given their own forum. Go and look at them! They are nice, and there may be new ones that you didn't know about! Hooray for rules! Hooray for The System! Hooray for Conforming!

VH's Birthday [Chat]!

1363739414244

Posts

  • Evil MultifariousEvil Multifarious Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Podly wrote: »
    Podly you didn't just say people actually have to justify their opinions to you

    that's insufferably pompous

    No, not to me. But I think that people THINK that they like something, when they really don't even like it. They just prefer to like it, and get outraged when people force them to confront themselves.

    Basically, most people's actual identity is a void around which they oscillate suppositions and fantasies. They should confront that and become actual people.

    i think you are misunderstanding the people in that thread

    they genuinely like BNL; they just aren't sure why, or are unable to express it

    when it comes to music, people often like what is familiar and comfortable (me included); some people like challenge, novelty, etc. it's like any art appreciation.

    BNL is like any kind of pop music, it's familiar, comfortable, predictable for many people, and that's good for them. they enjoy it. it affirms them.

    i don't like some bands that do weird rhythms because i can't get into a listening groove and internalize the rhythm. they're interesting and talented but i have zero interest in a song that doesn't have nice even rhythms. basically if i can't even attempt to dance to it i have little interest.

    comparing that to the way i approach literature, i feel my musical taste is undeveloped or immature, but that's okay. those words have negative connotations but they shouldn't necessarily. not everyone can appreciate every art on every level. it would be exhausting.

    Inquisitor wrote: »
    I fucking hate you Canadians.
  • stiliststilist Registered User
    edited February 2009
    This Zazen Boys track isn’t my thing, but the video’s cool.

    I poop things on my site and twitter
  • stiliststilist Registered User
    edited February 2009
    I didn’t like Saint Dymphna, but I don’t recall why.

    I poop things on my site and twitter
  • JamesKeenanJamesKeenan Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Podly wrote: »
    Podly you didn't just say people actually have to justify their opinions to you

    that's insufferably pompous

    No, not to me. But I think that people THINK that they like something, when they really don't even like it. They just prefer to like it, and get outraged when people force them to confront themselves.

    Basically, most people's actual identity is a void around which they oscillate suppositions and fantasies. They should confront that and become actual people.

    i think you are misunderstanding the people in that thread

    they genuinely like BNL; they just aren't sure why, or are unable to express it

    when it comes to music, people often like what is familiar and comfortable (me included); some people like challenge, novelty, etc. it's like any art appreciation.

    BNL is like any kind of pop music, it's familiar, comfortable, predictable for many people, and that's good for them. they enjoy it. it affirms them.

    i don't like some bands that do weird rhythms because i can't get into a listening groove and internalize the rhythm. they're interesting and talented but i have zero interest in a song that doesn't have nice even rhythms. basically if i can't even attempt to dance to it i have little interest.

    comparing that to the way i approach literature, i feel my musical taste is undeveloped or immature, but that's okay. those words have negative connotations but they shouldn't necessarily. not everyone can appreciate every art on every level. it would be exhausting.

    I hate even the idea that if a certain genre of music is appreciated by a snootier brand of person, than those who don't enjoy it should feel that they just must not be high-up enough to understand it. Their tastes aren't mature.

    Awesome.

  • OrganichuOrganichu Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Podly you are infuriating. I love you, though, and would like to coo you to sleep with classical Hebraic lullabyes.

    XMSODhjrer45.gif
  • Evil MultifariousEvil Multifarious Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Podly wrote: »
    EM, trust me, you don't want to be like NMH -- Jeff Magnum, to be precise. I once had a conversation with a friend of close friend of his. Apparently Jeff records all this music and then has breakdowns about how sad the world is.

    i don't want to be like him as a person (although i wish my last name was Magnum. Travis Magnum is a detective name if i ever fucking heard one).

    i love his lyrics, voice, and instrumentation. apparently he performed a lot of venues without even using a mic because he had such mighty pipes. i wish i could sing like that. fuck i wish i could.

    but yeah the dude is a bit messed up, or at least fragile. he's a melancholy poet kind of dude in the classic, stereotypical sense.

    Inquisitor wrote: »
    I fucking hate you Canadians.
  • DeShadowCDeShadowC Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    You know I understand the importance of spoiler tags, but if there's something I haven't finished yet, I wouldn't go into a thread about it.

  • JacobkoshJacobkosh Gamble a stamp. I can show you how to be a real man!Super Moderator, Moderator mod
    edited February 2009
    i think you are misunderstanding the people in that thread

    they genuinely like BNL; they just aren't sure why, or are unable to express it

    when it comes to music, people often like what is familiar and comfortable (me included); some people like challenge, novelty, etc. it's like any art appreciation.

    BNL is like any kind of pop music, it's familiar, comfortable, predictable for many people, and that's good for them. they enjoy it. it affirms them.

    i don't like some bands that do weird rhythms because i can't get into a listening groove and internalize the rhythm. they're interesting and talented but i have zero interest in a song that doesn't have nice even rhythms. basically if i can't even attempt to dance to it i have little interest.

    comparing that to the way i approach literature, i feel my musical taste is undeveloped or immature, but that's okay. those words have negative connotations but they shouldn't necessarily. not everyone can appreciate every art on every level. it would be exhausting.

    I think you've pretty much got it. And you're absolutely right, nobody can have fully developed taste in every arena of expression; it would take more time than there is in a day. And people don't deserve to be aggroed on because they like something safe and familiar - on the other hand, what I do hate is the reflexive hostility on the part of many people at the mere notion that it's possible to think about these things more deeply than "I like" or "I don't like".

  • BamaBama Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Organichu wrote: »
    Podly you are infuriating. I love you, though, and would like to coo you to sleep with classical Hebraic lullabyes.
    If I ever met Podly I would buy him a beer, and then probably break the bottle over his head the second he mentioned anything about art or philosophy.

    "Despite all the bitching, if Diablo 3 sucks, I will eat my own cock. Counter-claim: If Diablo 3 does not suck, I will have a list of whiners who need to eat cocks." - Zen Vulgarity
  • deadonthestreetdeadonthestreet Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    It's Jeff Mangum, not Magnum.

    Anyway EM I like your voice better than his so take that

  • PodlyPodly good moleman to youRegistered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Podly wrote: »
    Podly you didn't just say people actually have to justify their opinions to you

    that's insufferably pompous

    No, not to me. But I think that people THINK that they like something, when they really don't even like it. They just prefer to like it, and get outraged when people force them to confront themselves.

    Basically, most people's actual identity is a void around which they oscillate suppositions and fantasies. They should confront that and become actual people.

    i think you are misunderstanding the people in that thread

    they genuinely like BNL; they just aren't sure why, or are unable to express it

    when it comes to music, people often like what is familiar and comfortable (me included); some people like challenge, novelty, etc. it's like any art appreciation.

    BNL is like any kind of pop music, it's familiar, comfortable, predictable for many people, and that's good for them. they enjoy it. it affirms them.

    i don't like some bands that do weird rhythms because i can't get into a listening groove and internalize the rhythm. they're interesting and talented but i have zero interest in a song that doesn't have nice even rhythms. basically if i can't even attempt to dance to it i have little interest.

    comparing that to the way i approach literature, i feel my musical taste is undeveloped or immature, but that's okay. those words have negative connotations but they shouldn't necessarily. not everyone can appreciate every art on every level. it would be exhausting.

    I disagree. For example, people often identify themselves by the things that they like, by the things which speak to them. What music would I pick to identify myself? My current self? Probably Brian Eno's Another Green World, David Bowie's Low, Smashing Pumpkin's Adore, Bill Evan's performance in Blue and Green, the moment after the pickup in Beethoven's Der Grosse Fugue. Do I have actual reasons for liking them? If you would like to get into a discussion of rationality, I can do that, but lets assume that I do -- that my liking this music, it's speaking-to-me, is a transcending element which binds fast my multiple selves.

    Now try and do the same for BNL. I refuse to believe that someone could actually turn in upon their existence and say "well shit, yeah, BNL!" It has simply not been my experience in life. People live their lives in their interpellated egos and interpolate their existence in the gaps between what they suppose is true.

    follow my music twitter soundcloud tumblr
    hlB028K.png?1
  • RonaldoTheGypsyRonaldoTheGypsy I'm da BEST! Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
  • OrganichuOrganichu Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Bama wrote: »
    Organichu wrote: »
    Podly you are infuriating. I love you, though, and would like to coo you to sleep with classical Hebraic lullabyes.
    If I ever met Podly I would buy him a beer, and then probably break the bottle over his head the second he mentioned anything about art or philosophy.

    This reflects my thoughts quite well.

    XMSODhjrer45.gif
  • matt has a problemmatt has a problem Six pack on a dick Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Podly wrote: »
    Podly wrote: »
    Podly you didn't just say people actually have to justify their opinions to you

    that's insufferably pompous

    No, not to me. But I think that people THINK that they like something, when they really don't even like it. They just prefer to like it, and get outraged when people force them to confront themselves.

    Basically, most people's actual identity is a void around which they oscillate suppositions and fantasies. They should confront that and become actual people.

    i think you are misunderstanding the people in that thread

    they genuinely like BNL; they just aren't sure why, or are unable to express it

    when it comes to music, people often like what is familiar and comfortable (me included); some people like challenge, novelty, etc. it's like any art appreciation.

    BNL is like any kind of pop music, it's familiar, comfortable, predictable for many people, and that's good for them. they enjoy it. it affirms them.

    i don't like some bands that do weird rhythms because i can't get into a listening groove and internalize the rhythm. they're interesting and talented but i have zero interest in a song that doesn't have nice even rhythms. basically if i can't even attempt to dance to it i have little interest.

    comparing that to the way i approach literature, i feel my musical taste is undeveloped or immature, but that's okay. those words have negative connotations but they shouldn't necessarily. not everyone can appreciate every art on every level. it would be exhausting.

    I disagree. For example, people often identify themselves by the things that they like, by the things which speak to them. What music would I pick to identify myself? My current self? Probably Brian Eno's Another Green World, David Bowie's Low, Smashing Pumpkin's Adore, Bill Evan's performance in Blue and Green, the moment after the pickup in Beethoven's Der Grosse Fugue. Do I have actual reasons for liking them? If you would like to get into a discussion of rationality, I can do that, but lets assume that I do -- that my liking this music, it's speaking-to-me, is a transcending element which binds fast my multiple selves.

    Now try and do the same for BNL. I refuse to believe that someone could actually turn in upon their existence and say "well shit, yeah, BNL!" It has simply not been my experience in life. People live their lives in their interpellated egos and interpolate their existence in the gaps between what they suppose is true.
    You're assuming here that in order to like something, you must find a deeper meaning in it. This is false.

    h1DI1.jpg
    All my fuckin life I lived a normal fuckin life
  • BobCescaBobCesca Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Some people wrote stuff....

    Is it not possible to just like crappy music in the same way that I like to read crappy fiction and watch crappy telly? No deeper meaning other than "I quite like it"?

  • GooeyGooey Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Podly wrote: »
    If you like Zazen Boys, you should check out Gang Gang Dance

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E0VePHmc7iE&feature=related

    I like BNL more

    919UOwT.png
  • stiliststilist Registered User
    edited February 2009
    Pods, if you wanna go around telling everybody they’re living a lie, good luck with it.

    I poop things on my site and twitter
  • OrganichuOrganichu Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Podly wrote: »
    Podly wrote: »
    Podly you didn't just say people actually have to justify their opinions to you

    that's insufferably pompous

    No, not to me. But I think that people THINK that they like something, when they really don't even like it. They just prefer to like it, and get outraged when people force them to confront themselves.

    Basically, most people's actual identity is a void around which they oscillate suppositions and fantasies. They should confront that and become actual people.

    i think you are misunderstanding the people in that thread

    they genuinely like BNL; they just aren't sure why, or are unable to express it

    when it comes to music, people often like what is familiar and comfortable (me included); some people like challenge, novelty, etc. it's like any art appreciation.

    BNL is like any kind of pop music, it's familiar, comfortable, predictable for many people, and that's good for them. they enjoy it. it affirms them.

    i don't like some bands that do weird rhythms because i can't get into a listening groove and internalize the rhythm. they're interesting and talented but i have zero interest in a song that doesn't have nice even rhythms. basically if i can't even attempt to dance to it i have little interest.

    comparing that to the way i approach literature, i feel my musical taste is undeveloped or immature, but that's okay. those words have negative connotations but they shouldn't necessarily. not everyone can appreciate every art on every level. it would be exhausting.

    I disagree. For example, people often identify themselves by the things that they like, by the things which speak to them. What music would I pick to identify myself? My current self? Probably Brian Eno's Another Green World, David Bowie's Low, Smashing Pumpkin's Adore, Bill Evan's performance in Blue and Green, the moment after the pickup in Beethoven's Der Grosse Fugue. Do I have actual reasons for liking them? If you would like to get into a discussion of rationality, I can do that, but lets assume that I do -- that my liking this music, it's speaking-to-me, is a transcending element which binds fast my multiple selves.

    Now try and do the same for BNL. I refuse to believe that someone could actually turn in upon their existence and say "well shit, yeah, BNL!" It has simply not been my experience in life. People live their lives in their interpellated egos and interpolate their existence in the gaps between what they suppose is true.

    I'm not understanding the thrust of this.

    "These popular artists have work that speaks to me and how I identify myself. However these other artists- ones who don't speak to my identity, well, they can't speak to ANYONE. I refuse to believe it".

    XMSODhjrer45.gif
  • ViolentChemistryViolentChemistry __BANNED USERS
    edited February 2009
    BobCesca wrote: »
    Some people wrote stuff....

    Is it not possible to just like crappy music in the same way that I like to read crappy fiction and watch crappy telly? No deeper meaning other than "I quite like it"?

    Do you not realize what you're talking to?

    DAMM
    Drunks Against Mad Mothers
  • nexuscrawlernexuscrawler Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Podly you didn't just say people actually have to justify their opinions to you

    that's insufferably pompous
    No no, he just said his opinions are right, because their opinions are wrong.

    No he basically said people's opinions are not their opinions because they're too dumb to form them on their own.

    So it's his job to tell people what they're really thinking

    that's different from telling someone their opinion is objectively bad

  • HakkekageHakkekage Space Whore Academy summa cum laudeRegistered User regular
    edited February 2009
    JAI HO

    hey dudes

    What's crackin

    3DS: 2165 - 6538 - 3417
  • MedopineMedopine __BANNED USERS
    edited February 2009
    i love it when pods philoso-trolls chat :p

  • PodlyPodly good moleman to youRegistered User regular
    edited February 2009
    You're assuming here that in order to like something, you must find a deeper meaning in it. This is false.

    Actually, I'm not. For instance, I love the song "Spin me Round." I have two different versions of it on vinyl -- the single and the murder mix, to be specific. Do I find a deeper meaning in being spun round? Fuck no! It's a stupid pop song. If someone were to say "I fucking hate that song" my response would be "oh I can totally understand that."

    If someone were to say that about Miles Davis' solo on Blue in Green, I would seriously ask their opinions why, because I would try and show them a way to appreciate to enhance their life.

    follow my music twitter soundcloud tumblr
    hlB028K.png?1
  • deadonthestreetdeadonthestreet Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    I though everyone that wasn't me hated Adore

  • MedopineMedopine __BANNED USERS
    edited February 2009
    I though everyone that wasn't me hated Adore

    what Adore is fantastic

  • RonaldoTheGypsyRonaldoTheGypsy I'm da BEST! Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    ALL THE MUSIC I LOVE IS AUTHENTIC AND GREAT

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cOJe8MrN_ZE

    toadsig.jpg
  • HaphazardHaphazard Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Die große Fuge.

  • JustinSane07JustinSane07 __BANNED USERS regular
    edited February 2009
    BobCesca wrote: »
    I get to go out for Indian food tonight :D

    Oh boy! I hope you put down reservations for your bathroom.

  • JamesKeenanJamesKeenan Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Podly wrote: »
    Podly wrote: »
    Podly you didn't just say people actually have to justify their opinions to you

    that's insufferably pompous

    No, not to me. But I think that people THINK that they like something, when they really don't even like it. They just prefer to like it, and get outraged when people force them to confront themselves.

    Basically, most people's actual identity is a void around which they oscillate suppositions and fantasies. They should confront that and become actual people.

    i think you are misunderstanding the people in that thread

    they genuinely like BNL; they just aren't sure why, or are unable to express it

    when it comes to music, people often like what is familiar and comfortable (me included); some people like challenge, novelty, etc. it's like any art appreciation.

    BNL is like any kind of pop music, it's familiar, comfortable, predictable for many people, and that's good for them. they enjoy it. it affirms them.

    i don't like some bands that do weird rhythms because i can't get into a listening groove and internalize the rhythm. they're interesting and talented but i have zero interest in a song that doesn't have nice even rhythms. basically if i can't even attempt to dance to it i have little interest.

    comparing that to the way i approach literature, i feel my musical taste is undeveloped or immature, but that's okay. those words have negative connotations but they shouldn't necessarily. not everyone can appreciate every art on every level. it would be exhausting.

    I disagree. For example, people often identify themselves by the things that they like, by the things which speak to them. What music would I pick to identify myself? My current self? Probably Brian Eno's Another Green World, David Bowie's Low, Smashing Pumpkin's Adore, Bill Evan's performance in Blue and Green, the moment after the pickup in Beethoven's Der Grosse Fugue. Do I have actual reasons for liking them? If you would like to get into a discussion of rationality, I can do that, but lets assume that I do -- that my liking this music, it's speaking-to-me, is a transcending element which binds fast my multiple selves.

    Now try and do the same for BNL. I refuse to believe that someone could actually turn in upon their existence and say "well shit, yeah, BNL!" It has simply not been my experience in life. People live their lives in their interpellated egos and interpolate their existence in the gaps between what they suppose is true.
    You're assuming here that in order to like something, you must find a deeper meaning in it. This is false.

    That, and the sort of gross assumption about what people believe or find meaning in.



    Podly, that idea is the kind of stereotype you'd see played out on modern SNL.

  • matt has a problemmatt has a problem Six pack on a dick Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Podly wrote: »
    You're assuming here that in order to like something, you must find a deeper meaning in it. This is false.

    Actually, I'm not. For instance, I love the song "Spin me Round." I have two different versions of it on vinyl -- the single and the murder mix, to be specific. Do I find a deeper meaning in being spun round? Fuck no! It's a stupid pop song. If someone were to say "I fucking hate that song" my response would be "oh I can totally understand that."

    If someone were to say that about Miles Davis' solo on Blue in Green, I would seriously ask their opinions why, because I would try and show them a way to appreciate to enhance their life.
    So you like a shitty pop song, and it's ok for you to like a shitty pop song. But it's not ok for someone else to like a shitty pop song?

    h1DI1.jpg
    All my fuckin life I lived a normal fuckin life
  • PodlyPodly good moleman to youRegistered User regular
    edited February 2009
    I though everyone that wasn't me hated Adore

    No way man Adore is the best. MatIS has more amazing songs, but Adore is a more brilliant -- in the sense of shining -- album.

    follow my music twitter soundcloud tumblr
    hlB028K.png?1
  • OrganichuOrganichu Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    I though everyone that wasn't me hated Adore

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F5uXFt_PGYU

    ?

    XMSODhjrer45.gif
  • Evil MultifariousEvil Multifarious Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Podly wrote: »
    Podly wrote: »
    Podly you didn't just say people actually have to justify their opinions to you

    that's insufferably pompous

    No, not to me. But I think that people THINK that they like something, when they really don't even like it. They just prefer to like it, and get outraged when people force them to confront themselves.

    Basically, most people's actual identity is a void around which they oscillate suppositions and fantasies. They should confront that and become actual people.

    i think you are misunderstanding the people in that thread

    they genuinely like BNL; they just aren't sure why, or are unable to express it

    when it comes to music, people often like what is familiar and comfortable (me included); some people like challenge, novelty, etc. it's like any art appreciation.

    BNL is like any kind of pop music, it's familiar, comfortable, predictable for many people, and that's good for them. they enjoy it. it affirms them.

    i don't like some bands that do weird rhythms because i can't get into a listening groove and internalize the rhythm. they're interesting and talented but i have zero interest in a song that doesn't have nice even rhythms. basically if i can't even attempt to dance to it i have little interest.

    comparing that to the way i approach literature, i feel my musical taste is undeveloped or immature, but that's okay. those words have negative connotations but they shouldn't necessarily. not everyone can appreciate every art on every level. it would be exhausting.

    I disagree. For example, people often identify themselves by the things that they like, by the things which speak to them. What music would I pick to identify myself? My current self? Probably Brian Eno's Another Green World, David Bowie's Low, Smashing Pumpkin's Adore, Bill Evan's performance in Blue and Green, the moment after the pickup in Beethoven's Der Grosse Fugue. Do I have actual reasons for liking them? If you would like to get into a discussion of rationality, I can do that, but lets assume that I do -- that my liking this music, it's speaking-to-me, is a transcending element which binds fast my multiple selves.

    Now try and do the same for BNL. I refuse to believe that someone could actually turn in upon their existence and say "well shit, yeah, BNL!" It has simply not been my experience in life. People live their lives in their interpellated egos and interpolate their existence in the gaps between what they suppose is true.

    most people can't turn in on their existence and say anything, let alone pick music to express it. i think doing so is over simple and facile, whether it's BNL or Beethoven. The moment after the pickup in Der Grosse Fugue, what does it evoke? Your entire self? One aspect of one self? One moment of authenticity and genuine self-understanding? Why can't a person find that same thing in BNL, or Hot in Hurr, or Banana Phone?

    More to the point, why aren't people allowed to like music that is shallow and sounds nice?

    Inquisitor wrote: »
    I fucking hate you Canadians.
  • stiliststilist Registered User
    edited February 2009
    Haphazard wrote: »
    Die große Fuge.
    Technicalities! :P

    I poop things on my site and twitter
  • JacobkoshJacobkosh Gamble a stamp. I can show you how to be a real man!Super Moderator, Moderator mod
    edited February 2009
    I hate even the idea that if a certain genre of music is appreciated by a snootier brand of person, than those who don't enjoy it should feel that they just must not be high-up enough to understand it. Their tastes aren't mature.

    Why? Because it's "not nice" to suggest it? Why is that your biggest metric? Is being inoffensive the most important thing in the whole world?

    Besides - it is really more of a practical, pragmatic observation. People who get really into film or books or music tend to cluster around certain things. Individual tastes will vary, but averaged out among a large group of similar people, you're going to have a lot of film buffs who, for instance, love The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie and not very many who are all about Sorority Boys.

    There are certain things that to enjoy you need more of a background in that medium. Not everything is equally accessible to everyone. Why on earth should it be? What would be the point of that?

  • BamaBama Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    BobCesca wrote: »
    I get to go out for Indian food tonight :D

    Oh boy! I hope you put down reservations for your bathroom.
    I don't think it's that kind of Indian food.

    "Despite all the bitching, if Diablo 3 sucks, I will eat my own cock. Counter-claim: If Diablo 3 does not suck, I will have a list of whiners who need to eat cocks." - Zen Vulgarity
  • PodlyPodly good moleman to youRegistered User regular
    edited February 2009
    Podly wrote: »
    You're assuming here that in order to like something, you must find a deeper meaning in it. This is false.

    Actually, I'm not. For instance, I love the song "Spin me Round." I have two different versions of it on vinyl -- the single and the murder mix, to be specific. Do I find a deeper meaning in being spun round? Fuck no! It's a stupid pop song. If someone were to say "I fucking hate that song" my response would be "oh I can totally understand that."

    If someone were to say that about Miles Davis' solo on Blue in Green, I would seriously ask their opinions why, because I would try and show them a way to appreciate to enhance their life.
    So you like a shitty pop song, and it's ok for you to like a shitty pop song. But it's not ok for someone else to like a shitty pop song?

    If they get so outraged and yet can't say why, probably.

    follow my music twitter soundcloud tumblr
    hlB028K.png?1
  • ViolentChemistryViolentChemistry __BANNED USERS
    edited February 2009
    Podly wrote: »
    Podly wrote: »
    Podly you didn't just say people actually have to justify their opinions to you

    that's insufferably pompous

    No, not to me. But I think that people THINK that they like something, when they really don't even like it. They just prefer to like it, and get outraged when people force them to confront themselves.

    Basically, most people's actual identity is a void around which they oscillate suppositions and fantasies. They should confront that and become actual people.

    i think you are misunderstanding the people in that thread

    they genuinely like BNL; they just aren't sure why, or are unable to express it

    when it comes to music, people often like what is familiar and comfortable (me included); some people like challenge, novelty, etc. it's like any art appreciation.

    BNL is like any kind of pop music, it's familiar, comfortable, predictable for many people, and that's good for them. they enjoy it. it affirms them.

    i don't like some bands that do weird rhythms because i can't get into a listening groove and internalize the rhythm. they're interesting and talented but i have zero interest in a song that doesn't have nice even rhythms. basically if i can't even attempt to dance to it i have little interest.

    comparing that to the way i approach literature, i feel my musical taste is undeveloped or immature, but that's okay. those words have negative connotations but they shouldn't necessarily. not everyone can appreciate every art on every level. it would be exhausting.

    I disagree. For example, people often identify themselves by the things that they like, by the things which speak to them. What music would I pick to identify myself? My current self? Probably Brian Eno's Another Green World, David Bowie's Low, Smashing Pumpkin's Adore, Bill Evan's performance in Blue and Green, the moment after the pickup in Beethoven's Der Grosse Fugue. Do I have actual reasons for liking them? If you would like to get into a discussion of rationality, I can do that, but lets assume that I do -- that my liking this music, it's speaking-to-me, is a transcending element which binds fast my multiple selves.

    Now try and do the same for BNL. I refuse to believe that someone could actually turn in upon their existence and say "well shit, yeah, BNL!" It has simply not been my experience in life. People live their lives in their interpellated egos and interpolate their existence in the gaps between what they suppose is true.

    most people can't turn in on their existence and say anything, let alone pick music to express it. i think doing so is over simple and facile, whether it's BNL or Beethoven. The moment after the pickup in Der Grosse Fugue, what does it evoke? Your entire self? One aspect of one self? One moment of authenticity and genuine self-understanding? Why can't a person find that same thing in BNL, or Hot in Hurr, or Banana Phone?

    More to the point, why aren't people allowed to like music that is shallow and sounds nice?

    They're allowed to, it just makes them beneath him.

    DAMM
    Drunks Against Mad Mothers
  • gundam470gundam470 Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    What's a BNL?

    gorillaSig.jpg
This discussion has been closed.