AJAlkaline40

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Our new Indie Games subforum is now open for business in G&T. Go and check it out, you might land a code for a free game. If you're developing an indie game and want to post about it, follow these directions. If you don't, he'll break your legs! Hahaha! Seriously though.
Our rules have been updated and given their own forum. Go and look at them! They are nice, and there may be new ones that you didn't know about! Hooray for rules! Hooray for The System! Hooray for Conforming!

AJAlkaline40 ·

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  • Re: Separating "Man" from "Animals"

    ege02 wrote: »
    EDIT:
    Did anyone else see "Evolve" on the history channel? It was actually totally awesome and I'm considering making a thread about it. Anyway, they suggested that primates evolved such significant intelligence primarily because they have forward facing eyes that give them depth perception. Because of their forward facing eyes they had a small range of vision, so they began to rely on many sets of eyes all looking in different directions, so they had to develop the intelligence to handle social interactions.

    The way you state it, it doesn't make much sense to me.

    Maybe there's more to it, though.

    Yeah, there is. I'm just not good at this :P.

    Basically, monkeys developed forward-facing eyes to give them depth perception, which is crucial when living in the canopy. This was a major disadvantage for them against predators, however. For instance, rabbit eyes have no overlap, and they actually have nearly 360 degree vision, which is crucial for knowing when a bird of prey is swooping down on you. Monkeys lost that advantage so instead they developed the strategy of banding together, two sets of eyes are better than one, you get what I mean? Because it requires a much more complex brain to handle social interactions, monkeys were forced to evolve greater communication skills. Presumably they hit some threshold of brain development where they began receiving an evolutionary benefit just by being smart, and with thousands of other pressures this eventually lead to ape-like intelligence. Now the evolution of human intelligence is a good deal more complicated explain.
    Zilla360
  • Re: Separating "Man" from "Animals"

    Zilla360 wrote: »
    So, we know that Dolphins as a [great variety of] species returned to the Oceans after spending time on Land.

    The question that intrigues me the most, is what were their brains like before returning to the seas? Did they ever come close to our level of neurological complexity whilst on land?

    Presumably not, they were something between a dog and a cow. They probably didn't have the complex social interactions that they do now so they didn't have a need to evolve significant intelligence. Mind you that whales and dolphins evolved from the same ancestors and whales have less complex social interactions, so I would doubt that the dolphins were very complex animals before they entered the sea. I'm going to guess that perhaps the need to organize in order to catch fish is what drove their intelligence upwards.

    EDIT:
    Did anyone else see "Evolve" on the history channel? It was actually totally awesome and I'm considering making a thread about it. Anyway, they suggested that primates evolved such significant intelligence primarily because they have forward facing eyes that give them depth perception. Because of their forward facing eyes they had a small range of vision, so they began to rely on many sets of eyes all looking in different directions, so they had to develop the intelligence to handle social interactions.
    Zilla360