Mortal Sky

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Our new Indie Games subforum is now open for business in G&T. Go and check it out, you might land a code for a free game. If you're developing an indie game and want to post about it, follow these directions. If you don't, he'll break your legs! Hahaha! Seriously though.
Our rules have been updated and given their own forum. Go and look at them! They are nice, and there may be new ones that you didn't know about! Hooray for rules! Hooray for The System! Hooray for Conforming!

Mortal Sky · FONOTUNE · regular

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  • Re: The [movies] thread but also not the [movies] thread, you know?

    Mortal Sky wrote: »
    Dimetrodon was a synapsid with a sail on its back, similar to Spinosaurus

    so, palaeontology lesson

    the most primitive amniotes were the anapsids, which had a fused block of an upper skull

    the archosaurs (dinosaurs (plus birds), crocodiles, and pterosaurs) and other extant reptiles (everything you think of as a living reptile besides maybe turtles, which are ambiguously anapsid in form) are diapsids, with two major openings in their skull

    synapsids, which include pelycosaurs such as Dimetrodon, and therapsids such as Gorgonops, the cynodonts, and us mammals, have a third hole called the temporal fenestra. this acts as a muscular attachment point, allowing for more efficient jawbones

    Spinosaurus was a theropod, a clade which was part of the saurischian (lizard-hipped) group of dinosaurs, as were sauropods. the two most distinct clades of dinosaurs, saurischians and ornithiscians, had separated out by the late triassic. ironically enough, ornithiscians, the "bird-hipped" group which included duckbills and ceratopsians, were not related to birds at all - birds evolved from the maniraptorid coelurosaurs, which were some of the last and most advanced dinosaurs to arise

    tl;dr: spinosaurs and sailed pelycosaurs' distinguishing sails arose independently
    clarification of a few thingies above:
    an amniote is, at the simplest definition, the group which contains reptiles and us. the fossil record at the transition between amphibians and reptiles is a bit spotty, as is the record for diversification of the aforementioned skull types, but essentially, amniotes are defined by being fully independent of water, hardened eggs, and lacking any kind of metamorphosis.

    archosaurs do not include the plesiosaurs, which were closer to lizards and snakes. however, the aquatic mosasaurs, which rivaled the larger pliosaurs in size, and dominated the cretaceous seas, were even closer to modern lizards.

    mammals are cynodonts! the last clades of non-mammaliform synapsids to survive were the herbivorous therapsids called dicynodonts, which are actually not closely related - the dicynodonts were found so early on in palaeontological history that the only known synapsids at the time were the cynodonts and dicynodonts, hence the name. the therapsids were a very diverse group, and dominated the middle and late Permian (the age before dinosaurs - the dinosaurs occupied the Mesozoic). however, the therapsids did not take as complete control of Permian terrestrial ecology as the dinosaurs did, with crocodilians in particular having such apex predators as postosuchus

    theropods were everything from the basal dinosaurs coelophysis and dilophosaurus to modern birds. they are largely defined by the characteristic foot shaped they almost all share over the course of two hundred million years, and an upright posture. however, some of these theropods which look very similar are actually not directly related! they tended to have a conservative range of body shapes, with recurring trends based on environmental niche. tyrannosaurs, for example, actually started off as mid-size coelurosaurs, and grew to meet the size of prey that earlier carnosaurs such as allosaurus, carcharodontosaurus, and giganotosaurus had

    the coelurosaurs were the group which contained most known feathered dinosaurs: the tyrannosaurs, maniraptors, ornithomimids, and a couple other smaller groups. this was one of the last groups of theropods to arise (edit: fragmented fossils go far back, but their greatest diversity only came when the more basal carnosaurs went extinct - this is a recurring trend in this whole lecture, given how their near-extinction also drove evolution of mammals and birds), and probably the coolest
    Mortal Sky at
    GethCimmeriiFAQ
  • Re: The [movies] thread but also not the [movies] thread, you know?

    Dimetrodon was a synapsid with a sail on its back, similar to Spinosaurus

    so, palaeontology lesson

    the most primitive amniotes were the anapsids, which had a fused block of an upper skull

    the archosaurs (dinosaurs (plus birds), crocodiles, and pterosaurs) and other extant reptiles (everything you think of as a living reptile besides maybe turtles, which are ambiguously anapsid in form) are diapsids, with two major openings in their skull

    synapsids, which include pelycosaurs such as Dimetrodon, and therapsids such as Gorgonops, the cynodonts, and us mammals, have a third hole called the temporal fenestra. this acts as a muscular attachment point, allowing for more efficient jawbones

    Spinosaurus was a theropod, a clade which was part of the saurischian (lizard-hipped) group of dinosaurs, as were sauropods. the two most distinct clades of dinosaurs clades, saurischians and ornithiscians, had separated out by the late triassic. ironically enough, ornithiscians, the "bird-hipped" group which included duckbills and ceratopsians, were not related to birds at all - birds evolved from the maniraptorid ceolurosaurs, which were some of the last and most advanced dinosaurs to arise

    tl;dr: spinosaurs and sailed pelycosaurs' distinguishing sails arose independently
    tynicBrovid HasselsmofGrey GhostHermanochiasaur11WearingglassesAngelina
  • Re: Frog Fractions (...two?) and other [Indie Games] thread

    Some quotes on why post-cyberpunk is a thing, from the OG cyberpunks
    Cyberpunk today is a standard Pantone shade in pop culture. You know it when you see it.
    Although cyberpunk is now viewed as a successful subgenre of SF, it was indeed controversial when we started. But that’s the way we wanted it. All of us had, and still have, an implacable and unrelenting desire to shatter the limits of consensus reality. If nobody’s pissed off, you’re not trying hard enough. I’ll never stop being a cyberpunk. We started writing cyberpunk because we had a really strong discontent with the status quo in science fiction, and with the state of human society at large. Conventional thinkers even now aren’t yet comfortable with the notion that digital reality and mental reality are points on a continuum. Another cyberpunk teaching that’s not so widely known is that digital things can be squishy, funky, and smooth. Like robots that are made of soft, flickering plastic that’s infested with smelly mold.
    Cyberpunk is roadkill on the information superhighway of the 1990s. No more and no less. Bruce Sterling more or less declared it dead in 1985, and he was right; as a movement within SF it had done its job by then. The world we live in is the future of the 1980s cyberpunks.

    This is not necessarily a good thing.
    Cyberpunk is the genre that gave us the lingusitic back-formation “-punk”, meaning, “genre which messes around with”; but unlike its successor “-punk” genres (cypher, steam, etc) cyberpunk was actually related to punk music: raw, gritty, anarchic, rebellious, disgusted with empty conventions and proprieties, obsessed (on a certain level) with authenticity. Just as the innovation of the early rock and rollers and the British Invasion had degenerated (from the punk rock perspective) into the bloated pretensions, the light shows and orchestral follies, of 70s dinosaur bands, so too the authentic speculation of Golden Age SF had degenerated into a series of tropes — FTL galactic empires, humanoid aliens, nefarious AIs, loyal robots — which represented (to the cyberpunks), not thinking about the future, but merely using it as a set dressing. The real future was happening all around them, in waves of privatization and deregulation and postindustrialism and the end of jobs-for-life, in the Apple ][s and 7800 baud modems and BBSs… and the dinosaur bands of SF were ignoring it in favor of the light shows of interstellar colonialist adventure.

    ]Now, of course, cyberpunk itself has suffered the same fate. Noir antiheroes in mirrorshades and black trenchcoats hacking into corporate and government systems, the internet envisioned as an immersive (even physically invasive) world — these are no longer daring speculations: they are Hollywood staples. The internet is here and much of its nomenclature derives from cyberpunk’s visions; the world is full of the real-life successors of Case and Hiro — network manipulators with flexible moralities, independent streaks, and a willingness to hide in the nooks and crannies of the Matrix — from Nigerian scammers to Julian Assange. But of course, now that they’re real, they’re harder to imagine as Keanu Reeves saving the day.

    This produces a bifurcation. The tropes and standard moves of cyberpunk are static; the spirit moves on. No true cyberpunk, in 2012, would be caught dead writing “cyberpunk”, any more than a 1980 cyberpunk would have written trope-y planetary romance. The creators of cyberpunk are mostly still active, writing all manner of things, their restless spirit of inquiry still intact. They handed off their famous tropes to the decidedly un-punk factories of standard fiction, and asked new questions.
    Nothing “happened,” it’s just more evenly distributed now.
    There is a new collection of Cyberpunk stories coming from Underland Press, with me and Gibson etc… my cyberpunk novel Black Glass came out just a few years ago. But on the whole what happened to it, is that it was appropriated, co-opted, by other people, into other forms…cannibalized…I’ve done a redrafting and updating of my cyberpunk trilogy A Song Called Youth, in a single volume… And that is brand new and people are paying attention to it.
    For most people, it was surrendered to the cloud. For those who understand, it stayed on their hard drives.
    It evolved into birds.
    As a literary form, what happened was what happens to every successful new thing in any branch of pop culture. Cyberpunk fiction went from being something unexpected, fresh, and original, to being a trendy fashion statement; to being a repeatable commercial formula; to being a hoary trope, complete with a set of stylistic markers and time-honored forms to which obeisance must be paid if one is to write True Cyberpunk. Frankly, as the editor of Stupefying Stories, it cracks me up every time I read a cover letter from some eager young writer gushing about how I of all people should appreciate his or her new cyberpunk story. Yes, there are some bright new talents out there writing some great new cyberpunk-style stories that would be absolutely perfect —

    In the pages of Asimov’s, in 1985!

    But out here in the larger world time has moved on, and those kinds of stories look as quaint now as did Chesley Bonestell’s beautiful 1950s spaceship art after Apollo landed on the Moon. The cyberpunk trope, as a literary form, is still stuck firmly in the 1980s, with no hope of ever breaking free.

    But the ideas originally behind that trope — now that’s the cool part. My friends who work in aerospace tell me the old guys who built the industry all grew up reading Heinlein and Clarke, and went into aerospace to turn those crazy things they read as kids into practical realities as adults. Well, I work in supercomputing, and I can assure you that this industry is full of young geniuses who grew up reading Gibson, Vinge, and Rucker — and yes, me — and they went into this field to do the same thing.

    We don’t quite live in the world that cyberpunk fiction predicted. But we live in the world that the kids who grew up reading cyberpunk fiction built, and that is a very cool thing indeed.
    Last time I saw cyberpunk I threw 25 cents in its hat.

    GethLalaboxGvzbgulErich ZahnPwnanObriengtrmpStiltsOdincaptainkSurfpossum
  • Re: Frog Fractions (...two?) and other [Indie Games] thread

    goddammit geth
    miscellaneousinsanityErich ZahnaStoryAboutYou
  • Re: !spoO .daerhT scimocbeW sdrawkcaB ehT

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    tumblr_nfde97JJfW1r1dqpyo2_500.gif

    Iguana Mouth is a tumblr
    Moth 13Lord_AsmodeusStiltsTheStigRedBeardJimVegemyteShadowenDuke 2.0LalaboxRainfallThegreatcowvegeta_666RMS OceanicHermanoShenSkeithcB557Panda4YouFearghaillGoatmonSnowglobeMagic PinkThe SaucemasterofmetroidPOKÉMON MASTER WT SHERMANAbsurdPropositionkimeHeadCreepsSmasherAnialosdarunia106OdinAlbino Bunnyintrop