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ITT we talk about jazz

2

Posts

  • Lord Of The PantsLord Of The Pants Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    The "classic" quintet, was Miles, Trane, Philly Joe, PC and Red Garland on piano.

    The "Kind of blue" group was Miles, Trane, Adderly, Evans, PC and Jimmy Cobb.

    That line up carried on without Trane and Adderly with Hank Mobley in replacement, who I thought was a fantastic horn player, but Miles disliked and got rid of him. He then formed his "Second Great Quintet" with Himself, George Coleman, Herbie Hancock, Ron Carter and Tony Williams, but Coleman didn't get on with the band or something (Even thought I thought he was great, not that my opionion counted or anythign ;) ) so they replaced him and ran through some replacements (Sam Rivers, Miles In Tokyo, interesting album!) they got Wayne Shorter (Who was initially tapped to be Trane's replacement but was giggin' with Art Blakey).

    So, err, yeah.

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  • Lord Of The PantsLord Of The Pants Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Poldy wrote:
    "Well You Needn't" is one of the quirkiest, coolest compositions ever.

    I remember i'd played a whole host of Monk tunes, but when I bought Monk live at the It club, I understood how they were meant to be played. The interesting thing about that recording is how Monk is starting to loose it. He comps for a head or two for Charlie Rouse's solos then wanders off and gets a drink or something, or possibly just falls asleep at the keyboard untill it's time for him to have a (brief) solo. He even manages to change tunes in one song, the band keeps up with him (just) as he weaves between Evidence -> Straight No Chaser -> Evidence. Enthralling to listen too.

    One of my lecturers saw Monk in person. Said it was horrible, he just lay at the keyboard doing nothing while the rest of the band played their butts off to an increasingly dissedent audience.

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  • YosemiteSamYosemiteSam Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Poldy wrote:
    "Well You Needn't" is one of the quirkiest, coolest compositions ever.

    I remember i'd played a whole host of Monk tunes, but when I bought Monk live at the It club, I understood how they were meant to be played. The interesting thing about that recording is how Monk is starting to loose it. He comps for a head or two for Charlie Rouse's solos then wanders off and gets a drink or something, or possibly just falls asleep at the keyboard untill it's time for him to have a (brief) solo. He even manages to change tunes in one song, the band keeps up with him (just) as he weaves between Evidence -> Straight No Chaser -> Evidence. Enthralling to listen too.

    One of my lecturers saw Monk in person. Said it was horrible, he just lay at the keyboard doing nothing while the rest of the band played their butts off to an increasingly dissedent audience.
    Yeah, I've seen videos of Monk where he got up after (or even during) solos, and when he's not playing sometimes he'll just walk around or dance a little, kind of.

    YosemiteSam on
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  • gobassgogobassgo Registered User
    edited January 2007
    Jazz musicians are the quirkiest people.

    gobassgo on
  • Casual EddyCasual Eddy Don't despair. Not even over the fact that you don't despair.Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    How do you guys feel about older stuff like Count Basie and Duke Ellington? I love April in Paris (the whole album), I don't care if that makes me an 80-year-old on the inside.

    Ellington wrote some amazing pieces. Happy Go Lucky Local rocks my world every time I hear it. Latin American Sunshine is a bit repetitive but I like it alot, and Such Sweet Thunder is probably the most badass song I've ever heard.

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  • YosemiteSamYosemiteSam Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    How do you guys feel about older stuff like Count Basie and Duke Ellington? I love April in Paris (the whole album), I don't care if that makes me an 80-year-old on the inside.

    Ellington wrote some amazing pieces. Happy Go Lucky Local rocks my world every time I hear it. Latin American Sunshine is a bit repetitive but I like it alot, and Such Sweet Thunder is probably the most badass song I've ever heard.
    He was an amazing arranger, probably because he had an incredibly idiosyncratic way of approaching it.

    I got a Monk collection and I love it. I'm about to go over the edge and get really into Monk. Definitely one of the most innovative pianists I've heard outside of Bill Evans, and I really relate to his improvisation, if that makes any sense.

    YosemiteSam on
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  • Lord Of The PantsLord Of The Pants Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Grab a live set, something from Colombia preferably 2 cds long and with the Charlie Rouse band.

    I'd hit "At The Five Spot" or "At the Jazz Workshop"

    live in Japan (Tokyo? something like that) is meant to be good.

    Just think, what songs you dig, then look at one of thoose and pick the one with the most songs you know and you're away.

    Thats what I did, anyway ;)

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  • MalkorMalkor Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    I just bought Wynton Marsalis' Joe's Cool Blues. I'm a sucker for anything Vince Guaraldi.

    Malkor on
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  • Salvation122Salvation122 Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    LRG wrote:
    So I been watching/listening to Sun Ra and the Arkestra on youtube lately and that shit is dope. I'm gonna actually go to the store and buy a CD.

    I don't even listen to jazz; any suggestions on Sun Ra albums or just some good jazz in general?
    How many people didn't get into jazz by listening to John Coltrane and/or Miles Davis?
    I actually got into it through Dave Brubeck and Glen Miller by way of Sinatra. Go figure.

    (Brubeck's Out of Time might just be the second greatest jazz album ever, and for whatever reason it's somewhat obscure if you're not into jazz. Go buy it now.)

    Salvation122 on
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  • Salvation122Salvation122 Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    gobassgo wrote:
    Jazz musicians are the quirkiest people.
    You have no idea.

    No idea at all.

    Salvation122 on
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  • YosemiteSamYosemiteSam Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    I got Doo-Bop by Miles. On the first listen it was pretty good except the rapping really sucked, which kind of ruined a few songs.

    I also got The Inner Mounting Flame by Mahavishnu. It was better than Weather Report but I'd definitely rather listen to John McLaughlin with Miles.

    YosemiteSam on
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  • SenjutsuSenjutsu thot enthusiast Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Malkor wrote:
    I just bought Wynton Marsalis' Joe's Cool Blues. I'm a sucker for anything Vince Guaraldi.
    I get the feeling from Jazz snobs that I'm supposed to feel bad for liking him or something, but I enjoy the hell out of Amongst the People (Live at The House of Tribes)

    Senjutsu on
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  • YosemiteSamYosemiteSam Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Senjutsu wrote:
    Malkor wrote:
    I just bought Wynton Marsalis' Joe's Cool Blues. I'm a sucker for anything Vince Guaraldi.
    I get the feeling from Jazz snobs that I'm supposed to feel bad for liking him or something, but I enjoy the hell out of Amongst the People (Live at The House of Tribes)
    As far as I can see, the problems people have with Wynton Marsalis stem largely from the fact that he acts like jazz should stop developing and go back to what he views as its peak, the '40s and '50s, an idea which, ironically, goes completely against what jazz traditionally represents--a constant drive to innovate, more so than any other major genre, in my opinion. Also, the Kenny G effect is partially to blame--Wynton is certainly a professional-level trumpet player, but for whatever reason he gets way more mainstream attention than a lot of jazz musicians who are a lot better than him, which pisses people off.

    So I think people generally have more of a problem with his ideas than they do with his music.

    I heard him play classical trumpet once and I was amazed that this guy could also play jazz well. That's a pretty rare ability. Although I do think his ideas are pretty dumb.

    YosemiteSam on
    We are all very lucky to live in a world where there is this much music.
  • SenjutsuSenjutsu thot enthusiast Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Senjutsu wrote:
    Malkor wrote:
    I just bought Wynton Marsalis' Joe's Cool Blues. I'm a sucker for anything Vince Guaraldi.
    I get the feeling from Jazz snobs that I'm supposed to feel bad for liking him or something, but I enjoy the hell out of Amongst the People (Live at The House of Tribes)
    As far as I can see, the problems people have with Wynton Marsalis stem largely from the fact that he acts like jazz should stop developing and go back to what he views as its peak, the '40s and '50s, an idea which, ironically, goes completely against what jazz traditionally represents--a constant drive to innovate, more so than any other major genre, in my opinion. Also, the Kenny G effect is partially to blame--Wynton is certainly a professional-level trumpet player, but for whatever reason he gets way more mainstream attention than a lot of jazz musicians who are a lot better than him, which pisses people off.

    So I think people generally have more of a problem with his ideas than they do with his music.

    I heard him play classical trumpet once and I was amazed that this guy could also play jazz well. That's a pretty rare ability. Although I do think his ideas are pretty dumb.
    I get that his "theories" or whatever run counter to the "ideals of jazz", it just doesn't particularly bug me. At least in part because all of the newer jazz styles seem to suck more ass than an industrial Hoover enem-a-tronic.

    The music stands on its own as entertainment, for me. I care what he thinks as much as I care that Charlie Parker was a junkie.

    Senjutsu on
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  • YosemiteSamYosemiteSam Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Senjutsu wrote:
    Senjutsu wrote:
    Malkor wrote:
    I just bought Wynton Marsalis' Joe's Cool Blues. I'm a sucker for anything Vince Guaraldi.
    I get the feeling from Jazz snobs that I'm supposed to feel bad for liking him or something, but I enjoy the hell out of Amongst the People (Live at The House of Tribes)
    As far as I can see, the problems people have with Wynton Marsalis stem largely from the fact that he acts like jazz should stop developing and go back to what he views as its peak, the '40s and '50s, an idea which, ironically, goes completely against what jazz traditionally represents--a constant drive to innovate, more so than any other major genre, in my opinion. Also, the Kenny G effect is partially to blame--Wynton is certainly a professional-level trumpet player, but for whatever reason he gets way more mainstream attention than a lot of jazz musicians who are a lot better than him, which pisses people off.

    So I think people generally have more of a problem with his ideas than they do with his music.

    I heard him play classical trumpet once and I was amazed that this guy could also play jazz well. That's a pretty rare ability. Although I do think his ideas are pretty dumb.
    I get that his "theories" or whatever run counter to the "ideals of jazz", it just doesn't particularly bug me. At least in part because all of the newer jazz styles seem to suck more ass than an industrial Hoover enem-a-tronic.

    The music stands on its own as entertainment, for me. I care what he thinks as much as I care that Charlie Parker was a junkie.
    The difference is that Charlie Parker being a junkie didn't potentially impede the development of jazz.

    Well, on second thought, it probably did.

    edit: Also, another counterargument is "well, if you like jazz from the '40s and '50s so much, why don't you just listen to music that's actually from that period instead of Wynton trying to copy it?"

    YosemiteSam on
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  • Lord Of The PantsLord Of The Pants Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    My counter argument is normally, Wynton, shut the goddamn hell up. But that won't get you far.

    Instead I hand people copies of Cds that are out there, that advance the "Craft" (So as to speak) and are the product of a good 60 years of evoloution. I'm looking at you, Mr Dave Holland.

    Ps: Wynton sucks lol, also becuase he hates hith brother for 'selling out' and playing with The Dead, and Sting and stuff. Don't worry that he's recorded the greatest interpretation of A Love Supreme since Trane's orignal version (Which craps all over Wynton's soggy big band effort Bo-Ring!)

    But aside from that, he's a great player. He's just a gas-bag.

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  • YosemiteSamYosemiteSam Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Wow, the alternative take of Giant Steps sucks for the first 40 seconds. Actually sucks.

    YosemiteSam on
    We are all very lucky to live in a world where there is this much music.
  • PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Wow, the alternative take of Giant Steps sucks for the first 40 seconds. Actually sucks.

    Yeah.

    I honestly think Countdown gets way less respect than it deserves.

    My favorite thing about Giant Steps, though, is how COMPLETELY terrible everyone else is. They are fucking clueless, and then Trane comes in and bails them out. It's funny.

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  • YosemiteSamYosemiteSam Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Oh god, I was really excited about this Miles & Quincy [Jones] Live at Montreux CD, but this version of "Boplicity" is really rough right from the start, right down to being really poorly mixed. I hope this gets better.

    Edit: It is getting better. But the album insert said Miles's chops weren't really up to par for this concert, and it was right. This bassist has ridiculous tone though, I'm going to find out who it is.

    YosemiteSam on
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  • gobassgogobassgo Registered User
    edited January 2007
    Kenny Garrett plays a fantastic solo on "Summertime" off that album.

    gobassgo on
  • Lord Of The PantsLord Of The Pants Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Poldy wrote:
    Wow, the alternative take of Giant Steps sucks for the first 40 seconds. Actually sucks.

    Yeah.

    I honestly think Countdown gets way less respect than it deserves.

    My favorite thing about Giant Steps, though, is how COMPLETELY terrible everyone else is. They are fucking clueless, and then Trane comes in and bails them out. It's funny.

    The "Idon't know where I am, so I won't commit to any chords and just noodle" piano solo gets me every time too.

    Brad Mehldau's version of Countdown is pretty swauve, on Art Of The Trio Vol. 2(?) nice stuff.

    Does anyone rate any of the later Atlantic Material? 26-2 etc?

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  • Salvation122Salvation122 Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    There should be more love for Dave Brubeck in this thread.

    9/8 and 5/4 are awesome time signatures, and fuck anyone who says different.

    Salvation122 on
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  • Casual EddyCasual Eddy Don't despair. Not even over the fact that you don't despair.Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Blue Rhondo A La Turk is both fun to play and fun to listen to. Those key signatures are something else.

    Any spectular (lesser known) vocal tunes you know of? Honestly, I get a bit a tired of combo tunes since (to me) they seem to run together unless the soloists are absolutely amazing.

    Casual Eddy on
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  • Salvation122Salvation122 Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Blue Rhondo A La Turk is both fun to play and fun to listen to. Those key signatures are something else.
    I've played at least three different arrangements, and it never gets old. Take Five is even more fun but it probably sucks if you don't play sax.
    Any spectular (lesser known) vocal tunes you know of? Honestly, I get a bit a tired of combo tunes since (to me) they seem to run together unless the soloists are absolutely amazing.
    I'd be interested in this as well, although I think you kinda have to broaden your definition of "jazz" to get a lot of vocal stuff in it. Scat aside vocals rather strongly hinder improvization.

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  • YosemiteSamYosemiteSam Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    There should be more love for Dave Brubeck in this thread.

    9/8 and 5/4 are awesome time signatures, and fuck anyone who says different.
    I don't know, the majority of music I've heard in unusual time signatures sounds contrived. "Take Five" is the only 5/4 piece I've ever heard that sounds natural to me--like he actually thought of a melody that happened to be in 5/4, versus consciously making a 5/4 melody. "Blue Rondo a la Turk" is fun and all but it's not particularly substantial even as a "fun" piece.

    YosemiteSam on
    We are all very lucky to live in a world where there is this much music.
  • Salvation122Salvation122 Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    There should be more love for Dave Brubeck in this thread.

    9/8 and 5/4 are awesome time signatures, and fuck anyone who says different.
    I don't know, the majority of music I've heard in unusual time signatures sounds contrived. "Take Five" is the only 5/4 piece I've ever heard that sounds natural to me--like he actually thought of a melody that happened to be in 5/4, versus consciously making a 5/4 melody. "Blue Rondo a la Turk" is fun and all but it's not particularly substantial even as a "fun" piece.
    Eh. There's an awful lot of jazz that isn't substantial but is loads of fun - like, say, most of Coleman Hawkins - and I like it just fine. (And an awful lot of Tool stuff is written in wackass eighth-times; Schism is almost entirely in 11/8, for instance. But I digress. Massively.)

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  • YosemiteSamYosemiteSam Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    There should be more love for Dave Brubeck in this thread.

    9/8 and 5/4 are awesome time signatures, and fuck anyone who says different.
    I don't know, the majority of music I've heard in unusual time signatures sounds contrived. "Take Five" is the only 5/4 piece I've ever heard that sounds natural to me--like he actually thought of a melody that happened to be in 5/4, versus consciously making a 5/4 melody. "Blue Rondo a la Turk" is fun and all but it's not particularly substantial even as a "fun" piece.
    Eh. There's an awful lot of jazz that isn't substantial but is loads of fun - like, say, most of Coleman Hawkins - and I like it just fine. (And an awful lot of Tool stuff is written in wackass eighth-times; Schism is almost entirely in 11/8, for instance. But I digress. Massively.)
    I should have used the word "effective." There's better and worse music even on a "fun" level. I think "Blue Rondo a la Turk" is catchy but not as good as its reputation. I think it gets a lot of attention because it's way more accessible than most jazz. Time Out is one of the easiest jazz records to enjoy if you don't know a thing about jazz.

    YosemiteSam on
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  • Salvation122Salvation122 Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    I'll grant you that.

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  • YehoshuaYehoshua Registered User
    edited January 2007
    So how 'bout that bebop? Pretty complicated stuff structurally. It's pretty mind boggling to think that Charlie Parker could do the things he could do.

    Yehoshua on
  • YosemiteSamYosemiteSam Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Yehoshua wrote:
    So how 'bout that bebop? Pretty complicated stuff structurally. It's pretty mind boggling to think that Charlie Parker could do the things he could do.
    "Ornithology" is so good. That's a great example of effective "fun" jazz, while we're on the subject. Those are the most fun changes I've ever heard in a jazz song.

    YosemiteSam on
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  • YehoshuaYehoshua Registered User
    edited January 2007
    Yehoshua wrote:
    So how 'bout that bebop? Pretty complicated stuff structurally. It's pretty mind boggling to think that Charlie Parker could do the things he could do.
    "Ornithology" is so good. That's a great example of effective "fun" jazz, while we're on the subject. Those are the most fun changes I've ever heard in a jazz song.

    Oh wait... man, I just realized Ornithology is the study of birds... Charlie Parker... Bird.

    But yeah man, Ornithology, Anthropology... there are a lot of really great Charlie Parker standards. Recently, I've been playing and listening to a lot bebop, and I seriously got a headache, so much stuff was happening. Or maybe my headache was unrelated. But I digress.

    Yehoshua on
  • Lord Of The PantsLord Of The Pants Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    There should be more love for Dave Brubeck in this thread.

    9/8 and 5/4 are awesome time signatures, and fuck anyone who says different.
    I don't know, the majority of music I've heard in unusual time signatures sounds contrived. "Take Five" is the only 5/4 piece I've ever heard that sounds natural to me--like he actually thought of a melody that happened to be in 5/4, versus consciously making a 5/4 melody. "Blue Rondo a la Turk" is fun and all but it's not particularly substantial even as a "fun" piece.
    Eh. There's an awful lot of jazz that isn't substantial but is loads of fun - like, say, most of Coleman Hawkins - and I like it just fine. (And an awful lot of Tool stuff is written in wackass eighth-times; Schism is almost entirely in 11/8, for instance. But I digress. Massively.)

    A hell of a lot of modern jazz works on crazy time signatures - That work.

    Chris Potter does a fantastic version of Mingus' Boogie Stop Shuffle which instead of following four bars of four four, follows a bar of four a bar of three a bar of four a bar of two. So it's like a Seven Four/Six Four cycle. And it works. And they can play over it. Very grand.

    And i've harped on about Dave Holland enough in this thread as it is, but seriously. Not For Nothing. Time signatures abound (I mean working time signatures, not, oh grand, lets do something ine sixty-three thousand / thirty 8! Arn't we good!). Time is now just becoming a natural evoloution of the jazz pallette. Brubeck and company are special becuase they got it to work first.

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  • Lord Of The PantsLord Of The Pants Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Yehoshua wrote:
    Yehoshua wrote:
    So how 'bout that bebop? Pretty complicated stuff structurally. It's pretty mind boggling to think that Charlie Parker could do the things he could do.
    "Ornithology" is so good. That's a great example of effective "fun" jazz, while we're on the subject. Those are the most fun changes I've ever heard in a jazz song.

    Oh wait... man, I just realized Ornithology is the study of birds... Charlie Parker... Bird.

    But yeah man, Ornithology, Anthropology... there are a lot of really great Charlie Parker standards. Recently, I've been playing and listening to a lot bebop, and I seriously got a headache, so much stuff was happening. Or maybe my headache was unrelated. But I digress.

    The thing about Bird that gets you the most, is that a fair few of his earlier tracks (Antropology nee Thriving On A Riff) was a tune where they just rocked up to a recording date and went, right, How Highs the moon eh? Okay, i'll just whip up this head on the spot for you. Zing!

    Producer: Ahh, lets call this "Anthropology".

    I disagree about BeBop as being complicated. It's actually (In my experiance) easier to play than some of the later harmonic styles. A BeBop piece is nine times out of ten going to be over a set of changes based on I've Got Rhythm, or How High The Moon or even a blues. Meaning, that the changes are going to be more key-centric than something written by Miles or Coltrane, and thus, are normally quite simple solo lines.
    You can grab a Parker transcription and literally see him jumping up the arpegio, third after third. And anything else he does is just one of his tricks (Banging that 9th, or 11th. Hitting that Major 7th descending passing note, what have you) where as you CAN pick up a Coltrane transcription, (Any of you read Downbeat? They published on of Trane's Impressions solos, try and understand that) and have NO IDEA what he is harmonically thinking. But melodically, it works.

    But the real difference is this, you can grab a Parker lick over a F major chord, and you can then play that lick over any darn major chord and it'll be a beautiful melodic statement. Grab a lick from a major chord by Trane, and unless you know the 8 bars previous, the 8 bars after and at what part of the solo that lick is meant to come from, then it'll sound (By Comparrison) like rubbish.

    So leading us back to the original statement: Parker's brilliance (Aside from that fact that he pioneered a sound) is that he sounds complicated, and stunning from a very small pallette.

    Lord Of The Pants on
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  • Casual EddyCasual Eddy Don't despair. Not even over the fact that you don't despair.Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Blue Rhondo A La Turk is both fun to play and fun to listen to. Those key signatures are something else.
    I've played at least three different arrangements, and it never gets old. Take Five is even more fun but it probably sucks if you don't play sax.
    Any spectular (lesser known) vocal tunes you know of? Honestly, I get a bit a tired of combo tunes since (to me) they seem to run together unless the soloists are absolutely amazing.
    I'd be interested in this as well, although I think you kinda have to broaden your definition of "jazz" to get a lot of vocal stuff in it. Scat aside vocals rather strongly hinder improvization.

    Like I said before I'm a sucker for big band music although it seems to be less artistic than combo improv. Some of my favorite vocals are "My Heart is Heavy as Lead" and "Girl from Ipanema" - you know, sort of of classic jazz arrangements.

    And out of curiosity, why is Charlie Parker's nicknamed "The Bird?"

    Casual Eddy on
    Elki wrote: »

    Casual Eddy: best poster 2014.
    tyrannus wrote: »
    Casual Eddy: best poster of 2015

    gotta update that stuff man
  • PodlyPodly you unzipped me! it's all coming back! i don't like it!Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    I disagree about BeBop as being complicated. It's actually (In my experiance) easier to play than some of the later harmonic styles. A BeBop piece is nine times out of ten going to be over a set of changes based on I've Got Rhythm, or How High The Moon or even a blues. Meaning, that the changes are going to be more key-centric than something written by Miles or Coltrane, and thus, are normally quite simple solo lines.
    You can grab a Parker transcription and literally see him jumping up the arpegio, third after third. And anything else he does is just one of his tricks (Banging that 9th, or 11th. Hitting that Major 7th descending passing note, what have you) where as you CAN pick up a Coltrane transcription, (Any of you read Downbeat? They published on of Trane's Impressions solos, try and understand that) and have NO IDEA what he is harmonically thinking. But melodically, it works.

    But the real difference is this, you can grab a Parker lick over a F major chord, and you can then play that lick over any darn major chord and it'll be a beautiful melodic statement. Grab a lick from a major chord by Trane, and unless you know the 8 bars previous, the 8 bars after and at what part of the solo that lick is meant to come from, then it'll sound (By Comparrison) like rubbish.

    So leading us back to the original statement: Parker's brilliance (Aside from that fact that he pioneered a sound) is that he sounds complicated, and stunning from a very small pallette.

    Very well put. By flatting some ninths and including dimished and regular sevenths, Bird created some absolutely flying lines. Bebop major, Dave Baker calls the scale with both sevenths.

    However, don't sell bird short. He started doing some insane lydian stuff later on. And, I mean, compared with what people WERE playing, Bird is a genius.

    However, I think Dizz and Fats get downplayed. For my money, they were at least AS talented as Bird. Nobody could touch Dizzy in technique, and miles just ripped off Donna Lee from a Fats Navarro solo. But this just might be my trumpet bias.

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  • YosemiteSamYosemiteSam Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    So Stan Getz is pretty good news.

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  • YehoshuaYehoshua Registered User
    edited January 2007
    Sound-wise (timbre and tone), Stan Getz, Lester Young, and John Coltrane are probably my favorite saxophonists. Man, Lester Young..

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  • Lord Of The PantsLord Of The Pants Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    I haven't heard a Stan Getz CD that I didn't like. I think he made a serious point of getting top notch bands (I mean, really top notch) from a certain point in his career.

    Captain Marvel is a great album. More Chick Corea than Stan Getz, but stil amazing.

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  • XenosX_XenosX_ Registered User
    edited January 2007
    Yehoshua wrote:
    Sound-wise (timbre and tone), Stan Getz, Lester Young, and John Coltrane are probably my favorite saxophonists. Man, Lester Young..
    What about Wayne Shorter? I've always respected him for, if not his talent alone, his ability to play in various musical styles. On one hand, we see the proto-proto fusion bebop stuff from when he was a sideman on 'Miles Smiles', but then we go over to jucier Miles fusion on 'Bitches Brew'. And then through all of that, he gets funky on Weather Report.

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  • YosemiteSamYosemiteSam Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    XenosX_ wrote:
    And then through all of that, he gets funky on Weather Report.
    Yeah, but if there is a common theme to this thread, it's "Fuck Weather Report."

    I really fucking love "Moment's Notice." Today my dumb ass finally got a copy of Blue Train for myself and I'm listening to "Moment's Notice" for the fourth time today right now. Which, again, is another really fun song that's more substantial than something like "Blue Rondo a la Turk."

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