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[RESOLVED]Okay, Computer Hardware Nerds! [Video Problem]

ChanusChanus Harbinger of the Spicy Rooster ApocalypseThe Flames of a Thousand Collapsed StarsRegistered User regular
edited October 2009 in Help / Advice Forum
So, we apparently had one of those nifty power outages at work and I think it fried my graphics card.

Card was a shite GeForce FX5500, I'm not really heartbroken about its loss.

Here's the meat:

When I plug the monitor (VGA input) into the graphics card, I get no display at all, though its fan is running. When I plug into the on-board card, I get a display, but only at 1024 x 768. Control Panel offers me 800x600, 1024x768, 1280x768, 1280x800, 1280x1024, but if I try to change to any other resolution, I get instant reboot and the blue CheckDisk screen thingy when it starts back up.

The computer itself is an Acer Aspire from about three or four years ago (sorry), I can't find a model number. Best I can offer is the display I get from dxdiag is VIA/S3G UniChrome Pro IGP for the on-board chip.


So, I guess what I'm looking for is either A) A way to get higher resolutions from the on-board chip without instant reboot of death or B) Assurance that I'm not completely screwed and buying a new graphics card wont be futile.

Allegedly a voice of reason.
Chanus on

Posts

  • ThegreatcowThegreatcow Lord of All Bacons Washington State - It's Wet up here innit? Registered User regular
    edited October 2009
    Hrm, while the frying of the vidya card definitely sounds like a possibility, the behavior you mentioned between both cards seems to indicate a driver conflict of sorts. Video cards have really unique drivers that don't like interacting with each other so those blue-screens are probably a result of those driver's butting heads with one another.

    To really test out whether your card is hosed, go back into windows and see if the software for your physical gfx card is still installed. (Check your add remove programs in your control panel) Also you'll want to check your device manager (Start menu->Right-Click My Computer->Properties->Device Manager Button) and see if your freestanding card is still showing up under the display adapters list. If either the software, the device or both are showing up there, remove/uninstall them and reboot your computer.

    Now this will only temporarily force the computer to stop recognizing your card. To make sure it only attempts to access your standing card to test it out, you'll have to hop into your computers BIOS to disable your on-board graphics card to really see if the computer recognizes your card. (Hit delete repeatedly at bootup to get in there. There should be an option in your chipset features to disable onboard graphics)

    Now, when you boot next time, it will attempt to access only your physical graphics card. If it does not display anything, then that's a good chance your display card is shot and you'll need to switch back to your on-board graphics card until you decide to put a new one in there. This should also allow you to switch resolutions with your on-board graphics without causing it to bluescreen on you.

    Thegreatcow on
  • ChanusChanus Harbinger of the Spicy Rooster Apocalypse The Flames of a Thousand Collapsed StarsRegistered User regular
    edited October 2009
    Okay, I'll try that out, but I guess before:

    I noticed the driver/software suite was still installed and showing on Add/Remove Programs, but the graphics card was no longer showing as available.

    So, I uninstalled and tried to reinstall the NVidia drivers and got a message along the lines of:

    "NVidia can not find drivers that match your available hardware devices" (or something like that)... and so I've been unable to reinstall the drivers.

    It seems to have just "switched" to the on-board card for all intents and purposes since the power surge.

    Chanus on
    Allegedly a voice of reason.
  • PeregrineFalconPeregrineFalcon Registered User regular
    edited October 2009
    Go into your BIOS and find the video card search order. Sounds to me like it got toggled back to "Onboard" rather than "AGP/Add-On" first. Your motherboard battery might be weak/dead and the power outage made it go oh hai here's some BIOS defaults because I'm dead

    PeregrineFalcon on
    Looking for a DX:HR OnLive code for my kid brother.
    Can trade TF2 items or whatever else you're interested in. PM me.
  • ThegreatcowThegreatcow Lord of All Bacons Washington State - It's Wet up here innit? Registered User regular
    edited October 2009
    Chanus wrote: »
    Okay, I'll try that out, but I guess before:

    I noticed the driver/software suite was still installed and showing on Add/Remove Programs, but the graphics card was no longer showing as available.

    So, I uninstalled and tried to reinstall the NVidia drivers and got a message along the lines of:

    "NVidia can not find drivers that match your available hardware devices" (or something like that)... and so I've been unable to reinstall the drivers.

    It seems to have just "switched" to the on-board card for all intents and purposes since the power surge.

    That sounds about right then, if force-toggling the Video Card order to your freestanding card in BIOS does not solve the problem, then that sounds like your video card is physically borked and will necessitate a new one. Especially the message where it could not find any NVIDIA supported devices, that definitely sounds like windows can't physically interact with the card.

    Thegreatcow on
  • ChanusChanus Harbinger of the Spicy Rooster Apocalypse The Flames of a Thousand Collapsed StarsRegistered User regular
    edited October 2009
    Okay, so I went into BIOS and my two options for priority were PCI and OnBoard/AGP... meaning the card and the IGP are on the same priority option? (The most likely blown graphics card is AGP)

    After uninstalling the NVidia driver/suite would finding and reinstalling the drivers for the IGP result in it taking precedence and allowing me to switch resolutions without the apparent driver conflict?

    Chanus on
    Allegedly a voice of reason.
  • PeregrineFalconPeregrineFalcon Registered User regular
    edited October 2009
    If it's outputting from the onboard, it's already got precedence over the add-in card.

    That said, if the add-in card is still present, remove it. Likely it's causing you some manner of heartache there is that it expects only one of those two options to be present.

    Once that's done, uninstalling the NVIDIA drivers (you might need a third-party app for this, if the included uninstaller is giving you grief) and installing the IGP drivers should result in all available resolutions being functional.

    While you're fiddling in the BIOS though, check to make sure there's at least 16MB of memory allotted to the onboard graphics, preferably up to 32MB/64MB if you can afford it. Given the age of the hardware involved I'm not gambling on you having more than 512MB of total RAM in the machine. :P

    PeregrineFalcon on
    Looking for a DX:HR OnLive code for my kid brother.
    Can trade TF2 items or whatever else you're interested in. PM me.
  • ChanusChanus Harbinger of the Spicy Rooster Apocalypse The Flames of a Thousand Collapsed StarsRegistered User regular
    edited October 2009
    Ugh, okay... reinstalling the on-board driver didn't work... in fact, it crashed and I got the now all-too familiar Check Disk screen of doom...

    And, added bonus, I'm stuck in 800 x 600 resolution now! Fantastic! =)


    Edit: Oh, and yeah, I pulled out the card already after I determined OnBoard and AGP were the same option.

    Chanus on
    Allegedly a voice of reason.
  • ChanusChanus Harbinger of the Spicy Rooster Apocalypse The Flames of a Thousand Collapsed StarsRegistered User regular
    edited October 2009
    While you're fiddling in the BIOS though, check to make sure there's at least 16MB of memory allotted to the onboard graphics, preferably up to 32MB/64MB if you can afford it. Given the age of the hardware involved I'm not gambling on you having more than 512MB of total RAM in the machine. :P

    The computer itself isn't that old... it's an Acer Aspire T135 (for reference purposes if needed), though the graphics card certainly is.

    Chanus on
    Allegedly a voice of reason.
  • ChanusChanus Harbinger of the Spicy Rooster Apocalypse The Flames of a Thousand Collapsed StarsRegistered User regular
    edited October 2009
    Bah, okay, I think I give up.

    I can't reinstall drivers without crashing, I can't change resolutions without crashing, I can't system restore (nice how you set it to automatically create restore points and none of them work)... hopefully a new card will do the trick... or a hammer.

    Chanus on
    Allegedly a voice of reason.
  • ChanusChanus Harbinger of the Spicy Rooster Apocalypse The Flames of a Thousand Collapsed StarsRegistered User regular
    edited October 2009
    Woo!

    One last shot, I went into Device Manager and manually uninstalled the on-board drivers. After that I was able to reinstall them and now everything seems to be working again.

    Thanks for the help, gents!

    Chanus on
    Allegedly a voice of reason.
This discussion has been closed.