Bicycle Purchasing

DynagripDynagrip destroy everything you touchRegistered User, ClubPA regular
edited January 2007 in Help / Advice Forum
I have an excess of energy right now and I'm looking for a good bicycle option. I know the usual places to look such as Craigslist, etc. for deals. I am most likely leaning towards a road bike or a hybrid that would still be good for the road.

I haven't cycled much like ever, and one of my scary moments in high school was getting nailed by a truck as I turned into the road to my parents' house...So uh, I want to do this still, but something that could also be easily jacked to just work out on in my apartment would also be good.

Any brands models that are awesome or frightenly bad? What should I expect to pay for a solid used model? Is there such a thing as a helmet that is not retarded looking?

Thank y'all much.

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Posts

  • supabeastsupabeast Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Unless you plan to ride around in the woods a lot, don't get a hybrid. Hybrid bikes are a scam; they take a shitty frame, tack on cool-looking tires and a suspension, something with the word ”Shimano” on it and then charge twice what it's worth.

    If you have the money get a Cannondale or Trek bike, they're built well and worth the money, Raleigh bikes are a step down but still good. Giant mountain bikes are great, no idea about road bikes from them. Stay away from kiddie brands like Huffy and store brands like ”Specialized.”

    Prices are going to vary depending on where you live; a good adult road bike will run at least $300 new and can go as high as $8,000. Used bikes are an easy way to get something cheap because so many people get one to lost weight and never use it; I often see $1000 bikes in DC thrift shops for under $100. Make sure that the gears and frame are in good shape and not rusted if you buy used. Chains, brake shoes (pads) seats, tires, handgrips and pedals are all cheap and easy to replace (just not all at once!).

    When you buy a bike, buy a waterproof chain lube and use it as directed. Nothing will screw up your shifting and ruin your day like a dry, rusted bike chain!

    supabeast on
  • DynagripDynagrip destroy everything you touch Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited January 2007
    Exactly the kind of advice I was looking for. Thank you very much.

    Dynagrip on
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  • VmikesmittyVmikesmitty Registered User
    edited January 2007
    If you are seriously considering getting a good road bike, go to a local bike shop and ride a few. Stay away from High Tensil steel, it is weak and heavy. I'd stay away from Cro-moly also, road bikes should be light and fast, aluminum or carbon fiber. Of course price is going to reflect the better materials.

    Stay away from clipless pedals in the beginning, special shoes, special pedals and a special technique makes for accidents.

    Some brands to looks for would be Motobecane, Bianchi, Fuji, the previously mentioned Cannondale or Trek.

    I'd stay away from most sporting good stores also, most of the bikes they sell are of low quality and generally low ride comfort.

    Bike shops are the way to go, most employees are decently knowledgeable about bicycles, just tell them what you are looking for and see if what they suggest is something you could see yourself riding, and do your own research online, read reviews on what people say about different bikes.

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  • ProtoProto Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    If you are seriously considering getting a good road bike, go to a local bike shop and ride a few. Stay away from High Tensil steel, it is weak and heavy. I'd stay away from Cro-moly also, road bikes should be light and fast, aluminum or carbon fiber. Of course price is going to reflect the better materials.

    A Cro-moly steel frame is actually his best choice unless he is a serious racer. While it might not be as light as aluminum or carbon fiber, it's still not heavy by any means (my surly frame weighs less then 5lbs). Plus it is much cheaper, more durable, and just more comfortable to ride.

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  • ScrivenerScrivener Registered User
    edited January 2007
    One other tip: get a bike that fits you. If you go to a local bike shop (LBS), they'll probably offer a fitting service for a nominal cost. A good fit (proper frame size, seat height, handlebar adjustment, etc.) will go a long way towards enjoying your ride, plus it will help you avoid injuries.

    It is worth taking a little bit of time to make sure that you are getting quality components; Shimano and Campagnolo are highly respected companies and you will pay more for their equipment. I think the quality of their products justifies the cost, and each company makes several lines covering a nice range of price points.

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