Options

The New Comic Thread for Friday, December 11, 2009

12346

Posts

  • Options
    BusterKBusterK Negativity is Boring Cynicism is Cowardice Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Usually when people sell something they don't actually own
    The solution is usually to give the money to the people who actually own it

    BusterK on
    Visit http://www.cruzflores.com for all your Cruz Flores needs. Also listen to the podcast I do with Penguin Incarnate http://wgsgshow.podomatic.com
    Amazon Wishlist: http://www.amazon.com/BusterK/wishlist/3JPEKJGX9G54I/ref=cm_wl_search_bin_1
  • Options
    FyreWulffFyreWulff YouRegistered User, ClubPA regular
    edited December 2009
    When you buy a book though it's not actually yours

    you don't own the text, you own the physical book

    You can't edit the book up and then resell it as the same book, nor can you copy the book and sell the copies.

    In the same vein you own the hardware that the e-book was on, but you do not own the book data. You just downloaded a copy and bought the key to decrypt it. So in turn, they revoked the key because it was found that the publisher was illegally distributing it. And then gave the money back for it in full. You then have the option of purchasing an actual copy. It doesn't matter if you made the book worth more in your head than you paid for it, they still gave you back the money you gave them for it, because that is all that copy is worth.

    Also no theft occured because the same data is still sitting on the device, your device just can no longer decrypt it, if we're going to go with the argument people usually bring up for computer data. Theft would mean you physically lost possession of something; somebody hasn't stolen your car if they take your car keys and your car is still sitting in the driveway.

    Real books that end up like that are usually recalled and cannot be resold (whoops, lost your money). In most cases the B&M store will give a refund. So basically, in either case you can get your money back, but the B&M one has a time window and costs gas money to fix, while the other one is automatically fixed without wasting gas or time.

    FyreWulff on
  • Options
    FramlingFramling FaceHead Geebs has bad ideas.Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    FyreWulff wrote: »
    When you buy a book though it's not actually yours

    you don't own the text, you own the physical book

    You can't edit the book up and then resell it as the same book, nor can you copy the book and sell the copies.

    In the same vein you own the hardware that the e-book was on, but you do not own the book data. You just downloaded a copy and bought the key to decrypt it. So in turn, they revoked the key because it was found that the publisher was illegally distributing it. And then gave the money back for it in full. You then have the option of purchasing an actual copy. It doesn't matter if you made the book worth more in your head than you paid for it, they still gave you back the money you gave them for it, because that is all that copy is worth.

    Also no theft occured because the same data is still sitting on the device, your device just can no longer decrypt it, if we're going to go with the argument people usually bring up for computer data. Theft would mean you physically lost possession of something; somebody hasn't stolen your car if they take your car keys and your car is still sitting in the driveway.

    Real books that end up like that are usually recalled and cannot be resold (whoops, lost your money). In most cases the B&M store will give a refund. So basically, in either case you can get your money back, but the B&M one has a time window and costs gas money to fix, while the other one is automatically fixed without wasting gas or time.

    I don't care what the mechanism is. I paid X dollars for thing Y, because PerceivedValue(Y) is greater than PerceivedValue($X). When they took Y away from me, they stole PerceivedValue(Y) - PerceivedValue($X) from me.

    It doesn't matter if Y is "a car" or "a physical book that I can read" or "the ability to decrypt some chunk of data into an electronic book I can read," the math remains the same.

    Framling on
    you're = you are
    your = belonging to you

    their = belonging to them
    there = not here
    they're = they are
  • Options
    FyreWulffFyreWulff YouRegistered User, ClubPA regular
    edited December 2009
    So.. whenever an item drops in price, do you go file criminal charges for someone buying it cheaper than you did?

    Because technically they paid less than you did for it, less than what you value it as, so you should have them be arrested for stealing it. Because clearly they didn't pay enough.

    I'm sorry, but that's laughable. I don't buy Whopper combo meals because I think they're actually worth 7$ and only have to pay 4$. If I have to bring it up to the counter because they messed it up, I don't cry theft if they give me what I gave them back instead of 7$. The real world does not work like that.

    FyreWulff on
  • Options
    FramlingFramling FaceHead Geebs has bad ideas.Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    FyreWulff wrote: »
    So.. whenever an item drops in price, do you go file criminal charges for someone buying it cheaper than you did?

    Because technically they paid less than you did for it, less than what you value it as, so you should have them be arrested for stealing it. Because clearly they didn't pay enough.

    I'm sorry, but that's laughable. I don't buy Whopper combo meals because I think they're actually worth 7$ and only have to pay 4$. If I have to bring it up to the counter because they messed it up, I don't cry theft if they give me what I gave them back instead of 7$. The real world does not work like that.

    What was taken from me in that scenario you've strawman'd up?

    Framling on
    you're = you are
    your = belonging to you

    their = belonging to them
    there = not here
    they're = they are
  • Options
    KnobKnob TURN THE BEAT BACK InternetModerator mod
    edited December 2009
    regardless of whether or not you feel treated unfairly, that's not actually the definition of theft

    so maybe you should calm down, chuckles

    Knob on
  • Options
    FramlingFramling FaceHead Geebs has bad ideas.Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    So how are we defining theft, if "taking something from someone without their consent" doesn't fit?

    Framling on
    you're = you are
    your = belonging to you

    their = belonging to them
    there = not here
    they're = they are
  • Options
    AMP'dAMP'd Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Framling, if you buy something that was an infringement upon someone's copyright, it's like you own stolen property

    If you had purchased a watch from a pawn shop but it turned out that the person who sold it to the pawn shop had stolen it, it would be the job of the police to take from you that stolen watch

    AMP'd on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Options
    FramlingFramling FaceHead Geebs has bad ideas.Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    All right, fair enough.

    Framling on
    you're = you are
    your = belonging to you

    their = belonging to them
    there = not here
    they're = they are
  • Options
    MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    edited December 2009
    AMP'd wrote: »
    Framling, if you buy something that was an infringement upon someone's copyright, it's like you own stolen property

    If you had purchased a watch from a pawn shop but it turned out that the person who sold it to the pawn shop had stolen it, it would be the job of the police to take from you that stolen watch

    God, I hate to get involved in this, but as I'm sure you know, police =/ Amazon. Yet I don't believe there was any involvement with municipal, state, or national authorities with the 1984 thing.

    Also even with the police, they would have to track you down and/or ask you for the item. With Amazon, they just deleted/disabled the book without your consent.

    MichaelLC on
  • Options
    AMP'dAMP'd Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Amazon clearly did something like that so that they wouldn't get embroiled in the inevitably tedious legal matters

    I agree that the power to take away something with no warning is worrisome, but I think that Amazon was in the right here and acting otherwise would have been worse for all parties

    AMP'd on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Options
    FramlingFramling FaceHead Geebs has bad ideas.Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    I disagree. I think Amazon could have handled it a lot better, in a way that was more respectful of their users.

    Framling on
    you're = you are
    your = belonging to you

    their = belonging to them
    there = not here
    they're = they are
  • Options
    AMP'dAMP'd Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Like a polite note?

    AMP'd on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Options
    KazhiimKazhiim __BANNED USERS regular
    edited December 2009
    deal with the copyright infringement lawsuit

    Kazhiim on
    lost_sig2.png
  • Options
    Blake TBlake T Do you have enemies then? Good. That means you’ve stood up for something, sometime in your life.Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Framling wrote: »
    Olivaw wrote: »
    Framling wrote: »
    FyreWulff wrote: »
    Basically Amazon was between a rock and a hard place

    If they let people keep it they could have been sued for copyright infringement


    Disabling it and refunding it was the best move they could make, and I guess they'll update their procedures to check the rights trail for any books added to their store.

    Umm, they did. They did commit copyright infringement. Too fucking bad for them. The fact that they don't want to get in trouble for something they already did doesn't mean they get to steal it back from the people that bought it.

    Is it stealing it back if you give them their money back, though

    Yeah, sure it's stealing.

    I'm not going to buy something unless that thing is worth more to me than the amount of money I'm paying. That's how commerce works. Both sides get something that's worth more to them than what they're giving up.

    So if you go back on that transaction, you're stealing back that value. I don't care that you're also giving up the extra value you got out of the deal, if you're going to take something that's worth more to me than what you're giving me in exchange, and you don't have my explicit permission to do so, that's theft.

    Well Framling it is illegal to have stolen goods. You bought expecting it to be legal, that's all well and good.

    But say some dude stole a bike, sold it at a pawn shop and then you bought it thinking it was legal.

    Eventually the police figure out it was stolen, they take the bike off you. You don't get any money off the pawnbroker (sometimes you are lucky to get your money back) because you had something that was illegally yours.

    It's far more that the situation sucks and there isn't much you can do about it.

    Blake T on
  • Options
    AbracadanielAbracadaniel Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    AMP'd wrote: »
    Amazon clearly did something like that so that they wouldn't get embroiled in the inevitably tedious legal matters

    I agree that the power to take away something with no warning is worrisome, but I think that Amazon was in the right here and acting otherwise would have been worse for all parties

    The fact that they copped to the error and the President of the company put out a personal statement apologizing to all the people it affected, and how they would do their best to prevent future situations like it from arising shows a lot about Amazon as a company. They want people to have faith in the e-book format because it's an eventuality that people will use some form of e-book device, and they want people to use theirs.


    For the folks who say "Noooo, the e-book reader will never catch on," I say "when was the last time you read something off a stone tablet, or a scroll?" The medium will change, and there will be plenty of hangers-on and people who prefer to read a paper book (myself included) but the content is what's important, not how it gets to your hands. Not to mention that e-books will actually decrease the average cost of a book, as you no longer have to cover printing, packaging, shipping, etc. It's one of the reasons iTunes has been so ridiculously successful: they managed to create an incredibly decent piece of technology (iPod) to work well with a new and at the time, not well represented format (mp3s).

    Abracadaniel on
  • Options
    AMP'dAMP'd Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Blaket wrote: »
    Well Framling it is illegal to have stolen goods. You bought expecting it to be legal, that's all well and good.

    But say some dude stole a bike, sold it at a pawn shop and then you bought it thinking it was legal.

    Eventually the police figure out it was stolen, they take the bike off you. You don't get any money off the pawnbroker (sometimes you are lucky to get your money back) because you had something that was illegally yours.

    It's far more that the situation sucks and there isn't much you can do about it.

    Quit takin' my examples

    AMP'd on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Options
    AbracadanielAbracadaniel Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    whoops

    Abracadaniel on
  • Options
    DarmakDarmak RAGE vympyvvhyc vyctyvyRegistered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Smart Hero wrote: »
    AMP'd wrote: »
    Amazon clearly did something like that so that they wouldn't get embroiled in the inevitably tedious legal matters

    I agree that the power to take away something with no warning is worrisome, but I think that Amazon was in the right here and acting otherwise would have been worse for all parties

    The fact that they copped to the error and the President of the company put out a personal statement apologizing to all the people it affected, and how they would do their best to prevent future situations like it from arising shows a lot about Amazon as a company. They want people to have faith in the e-book format because it's an eventuality that people will use some form of e-book device, and they want people to use theirs.


    For the folks who say "Noooo, the e-book reader will never catch on," I say "when was the last time you read something off a stone tablet, or a scroll?" The medium will change, and there will be plenty of hangers-on and people who prefer to read a paper book (myself included) but the content is what's important, not how it gets to your hands. Not to mention that e-books will actually decrease the average cost of a book, as you no longer have to cover printing, packaging, shipping, etc. It's one of the reasons iTunes has been so ridiculously successful: they managed to create an incredibly decent piece of technology (iPod) to work well with a new and at the time, not well represented format (mp3s).

    I was about to come in here and say something similar, in that it doesn't really matter how you read, whether you choose to continue reading physical books or you read on an e-reader or what the fuck ever. Just get out there and read and don't worry if other people are reading via a different format than you are.

    Darmak on
    JtgVX0H.png
  • Options
    FramlingFramling FaceHead Geebs has bad ideas.Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Blaket wrote: »
    Framling wrote: »
    Olivaw wrote: »
    Is it stealing it back if you give them their money back, though

    Yeah, sure it's stealing.

    I'm not going to buy something unless that thing is worth more to me than the amount of money I'm paying. That's how commerce works. Both sides get something that's worth more to them than what they're giving up.

    So if you go back on that transaction, you're stealing back that value. I don't care that you're also giving up the extra value you got out of the deal, if you're going to take something that's worth more to me than what you're giving me in exchange, and you don't have my explicit permission to do so, that's theft.

    Well Framling it is illegal to have stolen goods. You bought expecting it to be legal, that's all well and good.

    But say some dude stole a bike, sold it at a pawn shop and then you bought it thinking it was legal.

    Eventually the police figure out it was stolen, they take the bike off you. You don't get any money off the pawnbroker (sometimes you are lucky to get your money back) because you had something that was illegally yours.

    It's far more that the situation sucks and there isn't much you can do about it.

    Dude, we covered this.
    Smart Hero wrote: »
    For the folks who say "Noooo, the e-book reader will never catch on," I say "when was the last time you read something off a stone tablet, or a scroll?" The medium will change, and there will be plenty of hangers-on and people who prefer to read a paper book (myself included) but the content is what's important, not how it gets to your hands. Not to mention that e-books will actually decrease the average cost of a book, as you no longer have to cover printing, packaging, shipping, etc. It's one of the reasons iTunes has been so ridiculously successful: they managed to create an incredibly decent piece of technology (iPod) to work well with a new and at the time, not well represented format (mp3s).

    Just like how CD's are so much cheaper than cassettes were, on account of their being an order of magnitude cheaper to produce!

    Framling on
    you're = you are
    your = belonging to you

    their = belonging to them
    there = not here
    they're = they are
  • Options
    AMP'dAMP'd Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Smart Hero wrote: »
    whoops

    I will now edit my post

    No one will have to know

    AMP'd on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Options
    AbracadanielAbracadaniel Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Framling wrote: »
    Blaket wrote: »
    Framling wrote: »
    Olivaw wrote: »
    Is it stealing it back if you give them their money back, though

    Yeah, sure it's stealing.

    I'm not going to buy something unless that thing is worth more to me than the amount of money I'm paying. That's how commerce works. Both sides get something that's worth more to them than what they're giving up.

    So if you go back on that transaction, you're stealing back that value. I don't care that you're also giving up the extra value you got out of the deal, if you're going to take something that's worth more to me than what you're giving me in exchange, and you don't have my explicit permission to do so, that's theft.

    Well Framling it is illegal to have stolen goods. You bought expecting it to be legal, that's all well and good.

    But say some dude stole a bike, sold it at a pawn shop and then you bought it thinking it was legal.

    Eventually the police figure out it was stolen, they take the bike off you. You don't get any money off the pawnbroker (sometimes you are lucky to get your money back) because you had something that was illegally yours.

    It's far more that the situation sucks and there isn't much you can do about it.

    Dude, we covered this.
    Smart Hero wrote: »
    For the folks who say "Noooo, the e-book reader will never catch on," I say "when was the last time you read something off a stone tablet, or a scroll?" The medium will change, and there will be plenty of hangers-on and people who prefer to read a paper book (myself included) but the content is what's important, not how it gets to your hands. Not to mention that e-books will actually decrease the average cost of a book, as you no longer have to cover printing, packaging, shipping, etc. It's one of the reasons iTunes has been so ridiculously successful: they managed to create an incredibly decent piece of technology (iPod) to work well with a new and at the time, not well represented format (mp3s).

    Just like how CD's are so much cheaper than cassettes were, on account of their being an order of magnitude cheaper to produce!

    Uh, Fram, a Kindle book is already at least a couple dollars cheaper than it's physical equivalent. The cassette to CD comparison doesn't work, because you're still making something physical, you're still having to buy the materials to create, package, and ship it. With an e-book it's just data over the net, same as an mp3.

    I can (and did) buy a copy of The Road for my iPhone for $7.99. The paperback is $8.89, excluding shipping costs and tax.

    The coolest thing? I can walk into a bookstore, see a book I'm interested in, and if it's available as a Kindle version, have it purchased and downloaded onto my phone before I leave the store, for less money. The future is so neat.

    Abracadaniel on
  • Options
    BusterKBusterK Negativity is Boring Cynicism is Cowardice Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    I myself can walk into a library and borrow a copy of The Road for $0 dollars
    I find that deal much better

    BusterK on
    Visit http://www.cruzflores.com for all your Cruz Flores needs. Also listen to the podcast I do with Penguin Incarnate http://wgsgshow.podomatic.com
    Amazon Wishlist: http://www.amazon.com/BusterK/wishlist/3JPEKJGX9G54I/ref=cm_wl_search_bin_1
  • Options
    FramlingFramling FaceHead Geebs has bad ideas.Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Smart Hero wrote: »
    Uh, Fram, a Kindle book is already at least a couple dollars cheaper than it's physical equivalent. The cassette to CD comparison doesn't work, because you're still making something physical, you're still having to buy the materials to create, package, and ship it. With an e-book it's just data over the net, same as an mp3.

    There's more to the price of a book than the manufacturing. You still have to write it, you still have to edit it, you still have to market it. None of those costs will go away. A packaged CD is dramatically simpler and cheaper to manufacture than a cassette, and music publishers used that fact to assure consumers that a price drop would materialize, and it never really did. The analogy is apt.
    Smart Hero wrote: »
    The coolest thing? I can walk into a bookstore, see a book I'm interested in, and if it's available as a Kindle version, have it purchased and downloaded onto my phone before I leave the store, for less money. The future is so neat.

    Oh, awesome, then you don't have to support that store!

    Framling on
    you're = you are
    your = belonging to you

    their = belonging to them
    there = not here
    they're = they are
  • Options
    AbracadanielAbracadaniel Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    But we're talking about ownership, Buster.

    t Fram: I'm all for supporting some local store, but we're talking about a Borders in a mall, I doubt my purchase elsewhere is drastically going to hurt them. I'm going with the seller who gives me the best price for the content I want, that's how competition works, it's called being an intelligent consumer.

    Abracadaniel on
  • Options
    L|amaL|ama Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    the internet often does make me feel like I'm living in the future, it's pretty great

    L|ama on
  • Options
    Randall_FlaggRandall_Flagg Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    I know a guy who, when he's taking a big book on a long trip, cuts the book in half so he only has to carry half of it with him at a time.

    I was like what

    Randall_Flagg on
  • Options
    OlivawOlivaw good name, isn't it? the foot of mt fujiRegistered User regular
    edited December 2009
    I know a guy who, when he's taking a big book on a long trip, cuts the book in half so he only has to carry half of it with him at a time.

    I was like what

    what

    That's insane

    Olivaw on
    signature-deffo.jpg
    PSN ID : DetectiveOlivaw | TWITTER | STEAM ID | NEVER FORGET
  • Options
    Randall_FlaggRandall_Flagg Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    I know

    this guy is insane though

    he's a photographer, and every time I see him he always has these crazy stories about how these Belgian Nazis are suing him for some photos he wants to buy, or like how the Russians owe him a million dollars or something

    he's so great

    Randall_Flagg on
  • Options
    Beef AvengerBeef Avenger Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    I think e-books will be hot shit in a couple of years, and can definitely see myself investing in a reader when prices get lower. I think i can live without the hole book tactileness / smell / whatever in exchange for the convenience.

    I remember hearing the Nook has functionality where it will let you "lend" books you've read to friends, so they'll be able to read them for 2 weeks or so on their device. That's pretty cool

    Beef Avenger on
    Steam ID
    PSN: Robo_Wizard1
  • Options
    BusterKBusterK Negativity is Boring Cynicism is Cowardice Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    When it comes right down to it
    Even a lower cost wouldn't provide enough convenience for me to use these instead of books
    But I would use these instead of newspapers or magazines
    Since those have significantly less content and cycle through new content more frequently

    BusterK on
    Visit http://www.cruzflores.com for all your Cruz Flores needs. Also listen to the podcast I do with Penguin Incarnate http://wgsgshow.podomatic.com
    Amazon Wishlist: http://www.amazon.com/BusterK/wishlist/3JPEKJGX9G54I/ref=cm_wl_search_bin_1
  • Options
    jwalkjwalk Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Newspapers and magazines are already obsolete because of the internet. They are far more transient, so nobody cares if you can't read it 6 months or 2 years from now, because it's old news then anyway.

    Books though, they are different. Even if you don't read a book twice, you can loan it or give it to a friend, or sell it in a garage sale for 5 cents... All things you can't do with a E-book.

    jwalk on
  • Options
    Kuribo's ShoeKuribo's Shoe Kuribo's Stocking North PoleRegistered User regular
    edited December 2009
    I like owning the things I buy, so until they get that hashed out I'll stick to hard copies, mostly

    which is a bummer because I can see the convenience of having all that information on a device with no worries of storage or what have you, it's certainly evident in the advent of the mp3 player

    but somehow the idea that something could just shut down one day and you'd no longer have access to shit you paid for is not too enthusing

    also I hate any digital service that limits or flat out prevents you from downloading a new copy of whatever you purchased free of charge

    like itunes, for example. itunes sucks.

    Kuribo's Shoe on
    xmassig2.gif
  • Options
    FaricazyFaricazy Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    i forgot who, but someone here was arguing with me that as far as collecting books goes, if you're not going to get a hardback, you might as well not buy it at all

    Faricazy on
  • Options
    ArtreusArtreus I'm a wizard And that looks fucked upRegistered User regular
    edited December 2009
    That is crazy fari.

    Also I think we can all agree that maybe some people want or need an e-reader, but not everybody does at the moment. And that is okay.

    Artreus on
    http://atlanticus.tumblr.com/ PSN: Atlanticus 3DS: 1590-4692-3954 Steam: Artreus
  • Options
    AbracadanielAbracadaniel Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    I think e-books will be hot shit in a couple of years, and can definitely see myself investing in a reader when prices get lower. I think i can live without the hole book tactileness / smell / whatever in exchange for the convenience.

    I remember hearing the Nook has functionality where it will let you "lend" books you've read to friends, so they'll be able to read them for 2 weeks or so on their device. That's pretty cool

    The Nook can lend a book, but only once, to one person. It's not all that great, right now. The trouble with lending is what authors and publishers are terrified of right now because it would be so very, very easy to pirate, but at the same time you don't wanna lock the whole thing down with DRM, either. It's a tricky situation that I'm sure someone will iron out at some point. Definitely agree on the price point of the reader, too. Maybe if I commuted by bus or something to work it would be nice to be able to relax and read and stuff but for now I'll stick to buying the occasional e-book for my iPhone and mostly pick up paperbacks.

    Abracadaniel on
  • Options
    CyvrosCyvros Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Defender wrote: »
    Also I hope you were making up that Star Wars EU shit with Teh Haxxor and whatever else. That was hilarious but please tell me nobody got paid for that.
    I looked it up.

    Turned out it was "Teh Roxxor".

    Cyvros on
  • Options
    the cheatthe cheat Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited December 2009
    what if it turned out that ebook machines were so cheap that they would just sell each book as an ereader loaded with that book. would you switch then?

    i think it would be cool if they made like... faux covers so that it looked like you were reading an actual book but inside it was a digital screen.

    the cheat on
    tKfL2Yd.png?1
  • Options
    AbracadanielAbracadaniel Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    the cheat wrote: »
    what if it turned out that ebook machines were so cheap that they would just sell each book as an ereader loaded with that book. would you switch then?

    i think it would be cool if they made like... faux covers so that it looked like you were reading an actual book but inside it was a digital screen.

    I guess that might fix the lending problem, but then you still wouldn't have one of the major benefits of the e-reader: being able to hold hundreds of texts all on one device.

    Abracadaniel on
  • Options
    M.D.M.D. and then what happens? Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    I buy a book and I lend it to friends to read all the time (as long as they don't dog ear the pages or generally mess up the book).

    Maybe they could do something like you set the book out for a certain number of days, so your e-reader can't lend that particular book out for the time it is being lent out to another e-reader.

    Then when the time is up that book is gone from the e-reader you lent it to and you are free to lend it out again.

    (I don't know how it's currently set to work as I haven't read most of this thread, I only saw the one person lend comment)

    edit - read some stuff now, I see how it works now.

    M.D. on
This discussion has been closed.