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    Lux782Lux782 Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    I have a design question that has me somewhat puzzled as to a good solution. Here is the problem.

    In order to lower memory requirements I have made an Entity class. It contains all static information about some object. All information on state of one of those objects is contained within an Instance class. Thus when you want to add an instance of an entity it reduces the amount variables used in memory by only instantiating a new Instance class that only contains state information.

    Next we have the World. It is made up of an array of WorldCells and each cell can contain at any moment a single Entity (which actually means an Instance of an Entity). I would like to have the WorldCell contain a reference to the Entity Instance that is on it but now I have some questions as to what should handle controlling that object.

    Should I have the Entity Instance have a method called MoveToPosition? I don't believe an Entity should have access to the World or even more-so a WorldCell.

    I thought about having a WorldCell call PlaceObject and it would place an Entity Instance on itself but that doesn't make sense because the Entity Instance itself is what decided if it is going to move to a location (or try to).

    I also thought well the World is technically everything so it could have access to all entities and their instances but it doesn't make sense for the World to tell an Entity Instance that it is moving to a location.

    The quick work around would be to make the World global but I feel sort of odd doing so. I guess you could think of it as a check. The Entity Instance decided it wants to move to a location and asks the world if that location is filled. If it isn't then the move occurs and the World tells the WorldCell that it has an Entity Instance on it.

    I would like to hear thoughts on this.

    Lux782 on
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    khainkhain Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    I would think that the World should have a move function that is passed to this Entity class when it's created and then the Entities can call it when they want to move since they decide when to do so, but the World is the one that needs to check if the move is allowed.

    khain on
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    SenjutsuSenjutsu thot enthusiast Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Seol wrote: »
    Senjutsu wrote: »
    Oh also it was completely dead code. So I don't really know what is worse, that somebody wrote that, or having written it, never used it, and left it in trunk anyways.
    i can see, possibly, someone thinking "i'm doing TWO things here on many occasions, which could be ONE thing!!11!" and writing that code in a misguided attempt to improve "code re-use". it would be wrong, but from a certain perspective, it would be understandable.

    It's just such a clusterfuck of bad. The class name sucks. The method name is misleading. The method is generic when it shouldn't be. The generic type placeholder is named the same as the generic placeholder for the class, generating a pointless compiler warning. The boolean is spectacularly redundant. Etc, etc.

    edit: and why he thought this was a better solution than eliminating the null check but stopping the nulls from coming forward at a lower level, I don't know.

    Senjutsu on
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    mrcheesypantsmrcheesypants Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    templewulf wrote: »
    Senjutsu wrote: »
    How not to have me punch you in the dick in one easy step:

    1) Don't write this:
        public class ListHelper<T>
        {
            public static bool HasItems<T>(List<T> list)
            {
                bool hasItems = false;
    
                if (list != null && list.Count > 0)
                {
                    hasItems = true;
                }
    
                return hasItems;
            }
        }
    
    You know, reading that code is itself like being punched in the genitals. You know how the initial shock doesn't necessarily hurt, but once you start breathing again you feel an incredible ache creep up on you?

    Yeah, once I realized there was a "ListHelper" class, I doubled over in pain. True story.

    You know when I first looked at the code I thought to myself "meh, that's not too bad. I mean we've all written overly complicated boolean functions like that when we weren't thinking."

    But then you pointed out that it was a List Helper Class.

    Thanks for the brain asplosion. I hate you and hope you die in a fire.

    mrcheesypants on
    Diamond Code: 2706 8089 2710
    Oh god. When I was younger, me and my friends wanted to burn the Harry Potter books.

    Then I moved to Georgia.
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    durandal4532durandal4532 Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Shit. So I'm using Netbeans 6.8, and I'm playing with the visual GUI editor trying to make something.

    The problem I'm running into is that 5 tutorials in I have a vague idea of what to do... if the program is only one screen. The only tutorial showing how to make it so that selecting a menu item or clicking a button opens a new panel/screen for input is one that's A.) broken and B.) only willing to say "copy and paste this stuff into code that was auto-generated", rather than explain it step by step.

    So, if I make two JFrame objects, and one of them has a menu like

    Entry
    ->new

    How do I make it so that selecting "new" opens up the other one?

    durandal4532 on
    Take a moment to donate what you can to Critical Resistance and Black Lives Matter.
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    NightslyrNightslyr Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    templewulf wrote: »
    Senjutsu wrote: »
    How not to have me punch you in the dick in one easy step:

    1) Don't write this:
        public class ListHelper<T>
        {
            public static bool HasItems<T>(List<T> list)
            {
                bool hasItems = false;
    
                if (list != null && list.Count > 0)
                {
                    hasItems = true;
                }
    
                return hasItems;
            }
        }
    
    You know, reading that code is itself like being punched in the genitals. You know how the initial shock doesn't necessarily hurt, but once you start breathing again you feel an incredible ache creep up on you?

    Yeah, once I realized there was a "ListHelper" class, I doubled over in pain. True story.

    You know when I first looked at the code I thought to myself "meh, that's not too bad. I mean we've all written overly complicated boolean functions like that when we weren't thinking."

    But then you pointed out that it was a List Helper Class.

    Thanks for the brain asplosion. I hate you and hope you die in a fire.

    Can someone explain why a ListHelper class like this is bad? I mean, to me it clearly looks like whoever wrote this intended for it to be an extension method, except they didn't finalize the syntax (no 'this' in the method's argument list). I mean, yeah, the method is redundant, and over-written, but I don't see why the ListHelper part in particular is bad. I'm sure I'm missing something obvious.

    Nightslyr on
  • Options
    mrcheesypantsmrcheesypants Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Nightslyr wrote: »
    templewulf wrote: »
    Senjutsu wrote: »
    How not to have me punch you in the dick in one easy step:

    1) Don't write this:
        public class ListHelper<T>
        {
            public static bool HasItems<T>(List<T> list)
            {
                bool hasItems = false;
    
                if (list != null && list.Count > 0)
                {
                    hasItems = true;
                }
    
                return hasItems;
            }
        }
    
    You know, reading that code is itself like being punched in the genitals. You know how the initial shock doesn't necessarily hurt, but once you start breathing again you feel an incredible ache creep up on you?

    Yeah, once I realized there was a "ListHelper" class, I doubled over in pain. True story.

    You know when I first looked at the code I thought to myself "meh, that's not too bad. I mean we've all written overly complicated boolean functions like that when we weren't thinking."

    But then you pointed out that it was a List Helper Class.

    Thanks for the brain asplosion. I hate you and hope you die in a fire.

    Can someone explain why a ListHelper class like this is bad? I mean, to me it clearly looks like whoever wrote this intended for it to be an extension method, except they didn't finalize the syntax (no 'this' in the method's argument list). I mean, yeah, the method is redundant, and over-written, but I don't see why the ListHelper part in particular is bad. I'm sure I'm missing something obvious.

    Personally the reason why I don't like the class is to implement it you'll type ListHelper.hasItems(myList). Now first of all this doesn't cause that much improvement in readability. Seeing mylist.Count > 0 && mylist != null doesn't make me wonder what's being checked since it's pretty obvious and you're only saving a few characters of typing. Also when I see a method named hasItems, I think it's a non static method and expect to look for an object in the code instead of a class.

    Depending on the context of the code there might be some other reasons as well, but generally it's considered a bad habit to make a single method class especially if said method is just a boolean "isEmpty" check.

    mrcheesypants on
    Diamond Code: 2706 8089 2710
    Oh god. When I was younger, me and my friends wanted to burn the Harry Potter books.

    Then I moved to Georgia.
  • Options
    SenjutsuSenjutsu thot enthusiast Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    You would actually have to type ListHelper<MyType>.HasItems<MyType>(myList)

    edit: and it would basically suck as an extension method because you could write something like myList.HasItems() where myList is actually null, so, due to where the method is defined, you could get away with calling a method on a null value in a way that would convince a casual reader that the value couldn't be null.

    Everything about it is shit.

    Senjutsu on
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    InfidelInfidel Heretic Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    hasItems()

    Gee, that's what methods are for, amirite?

    Infidel on
    OrokosPA.png
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    JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    edited December 2009
    That violates some natural law.

    Jasconius on
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    EndEnd Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    It wouldn't take much to turn it into an extension method.

    Of course, at that point, the null check would be meaningless.

    End on
    I wish that someway, somehow, that I could save every one of us
    zaleiria-by-lexxy-sig.jpg
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    mrcheesypantsmrcheesypants Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Guess now would be a good time to post my favorite languages and perhaps get us away from talking about that horrible code.
    Language: Python
    Framework: Various Libraries. Usually the API is good enough for my uses.
    Purpose: Usually personal scripting for my Linux machine.

    Summary: Basically, I'm not a fan of bash for anything over 40 lines of code so I use python
    instead. It's a good, readable parsing language that helps me through various tasks. Right now
    I'm working on a webcomic script that grabs all my favorite webcomics and uses them as my
    desktop background. I'll post it here if anyone is interested.

    Lanugage: PHP
    Framework: CakePHP but probably going to switch to CI here shortly
    Purpose: occasional free lance contract

    Summary: I've been messing around with PHP for a few years and I finally got a contract from
    my "designer" friends. Turns out that the "designers" could only use basic dreamweaver and flash
    studio as well as plagiarize other designer's work for their portfolio. When they won a project
    that was a bit more dynamic, they thought they could just offshore most of the front end to
    some guy in China. Turns out they cant and this was a violation to their NDA and contract.

    So now I'm looking for an actual designer so I can get some freelance work and start coding
    for money again.

    mrcheesypants on
    Diamond Code: 2706 8089 2710
    Oh god. When I was younger, me and my friends wanted to burn the Harry Potter books.

    Then I moved to Georgia.
  • Options
    gilraingilrain Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Hello Programming Thread. I'm an on-again, off-again personal programmer, very sharp and quick to pick up anything, but not practiced enough to have a quick head for algorithms. I go for years without programming, then program for a few months. This is a result of there pretty much being a program for anything I want to do already, so why invent the wheel? Anyways, a project came up that there isn't really a program for (more specifically: nothing good/updated/quite-what-I-want), so it's back to my erstwhile hobby!

    My project came about because my girlfriend and I both love, love the sound of a well-tuned wind chime. It's so pleasant and relaxing and pleasingly random, right? We have some very nice ones, but they're pretty much inaudible indoors aside from in very high wind. I said, "Well, we could move one indoors and point a fan at it..." but then quickly moved on to, "Oh, hey! I could program a windchime simulator!" So, there we go.

    I don't know why I wrote a hugelong intro to my project. I only have one, simple question right now, as the overall project is going smoothly. :P

    My wind chime object generates individual tube hits at a rate determined by a single floating point number that represents overall wind speed. Or, since turbulence next to a building and close to the ground is such that its pretty random, it sort of stands in for "wind activity" in general. This allows me to bypass the black hole of trying to simulate how wind speed and direction interact with the clapper to generate particular hits. This simplification should still sound natural and allow me to move the project on. If I want to later, I'll look into a more physical simulation.

    Anyway, the hits are being generated nicely, given a wind activity float like, say 0.5. The next step is to design a function that generates random-but-natural variations in wind speed given an overall activity guideline. I suppose any nicely-varied, non-repeating continuous math function would work... but I would enjoy it being at least somewhat based on reality, or else it might sound unnatural. The only google results I get are for research papers which go way beyond what I need or can deal with.

    Any ideas? Anyone know any math functions that'd be good candidates? Comments in general?

    Edit: in case it's not obvious, the key word here is "continuous." Just using random.random() would produce, of course, jarring, discrete jumps in wind activity. I basically need a continuous version of a RNG, but would prefer a function based on real wind simulation. Or something in between.

    gilrain on
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    gilraingilrain Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Heh, wow, so some googling later and this. It sounds like it might be an accurate model of wind turbulence, albeit designed for aeronautics engineering... if I could wrap my head around the ridiculous amount of math on that page, it might just work. :P

    Looking at this, I'll probably just settle for some kind of continuous random function, assuming such a thing exists and I can find one.

    Edit: aha, it looks like Perlin noise was pretty much invented to solve problems like this. And there's a Python implementation, so sweet. Onwards with the programming!

    gilrain on
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    xzzyxzzy Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    You can smooth out random number generation by computing a rolling average. Populate an array of, say, 20 random numbers and figure the average. Use that average to calculate the intensity of the chimes. Every time the program loops, eliminate the oldest random value and add a new one, calculate a new average. The bigger your array of random values, the more 'resistant' your chimes will be to gusts of winds.

    To improve the illusion, come up with some way to "decay" the average. That is, when a gust of wind sounds a chime, it takes a few seconds for the chime to settle down.. it creates progressively quieter noises until there's nothing. You might be able to do this by running over your array of random values, and subtracting a small amount on every program loop.

    I'm not sure how well this will play out in practice.. but it sounds simple enough, and saves you the pain of having to implement fluid dynamics.

    xzzy on
  • Options
    gilraingilrain Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    xzzy wrote: »
    To improve the illusion, come up with some way to "decay" the average. That is, when a gust of wind sounds a chime, it takes a few seconds for the chime to settle down.. it creates progressively quieter noises until there's nothing. You might be able to do this by running over your array of random values, and subtracting a small amount on every program loop.
    I like this aspect of your idea a lot. It could wind up sounding a lot more natural than the Perlin noise in my edit, above. I'm going to throw noise in first, since it'll be easy to implement, but if it doesn't sound natural enough I'll definitely try implementing your idea -- it should be pretty easy, and, conceptually anyway, it looks like it'd sound natural. Thanks!

    gilrain on
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    lazerbeardlazerbeard Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    I've mentioned this before, but the best way I know to pick a bunch of points and make a curve which is continuous is a spline. There are many kinds of splines which take varying amounts of effort, computation, and the exact results will vary. Catmull-Rom is a good one, and if you're using C or C++ you can use the D3DXMath library (or the XNA equivalent if you're using C#) to do the hard work for you. Basically you just need to pick random points, then run a spline through those points and you're guaranteed what you want.

    lazerbeard on
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    gilraingilrain Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    lazerbeard wrote: »
    I've mentioned this before, but the best way I know to pick a bunch of points and make a curve which is continuous is a spline. There are many kinds of splines which take varying amounts of effort, computation, and the exact results will vary. Catmull-Rom is a good one, and if you're using C or C++ you can use the D3DXMath library (or the XNA equivalent if you're using C#) to do the hard work for you. Basically you just need to pick random points, then run a spline through those points and you're guaranteed what you want.
    Yeah, that's pretty much what Perlin noise is doing in the background, looks like. It just does it several times and uses all the results to create a more complex curve/matrix. Check out this page and scroll down for easy-to-understand pictures.

    Looks perfect. And I could use a separate damping function, or something, to add in xzzy's decay idea maybe.

    gilrain on
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    xzzyxzzy Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    I must have missed the bit about perlin noise, or you edited it in while I was typing.

    Either way, perlin noise basically does what I suggested. It takes random data at several levels of resolution, and averages it together to get curves smoother than "true" random can provide. The hardest part is developing a good algorithm for the random values. Your function has to be able to produce the exact same output when given the exact same input, and doing this involves a fair amount of homework. There's a lot of examples around the internet you can cut and paste, but where's the fun in that? :)

    An ideal algorithm for this problem wouldn't be perfectly smooth. Each peak would be followed by successively quieter peaks, and if you used perlin noise to do this, you'd need a lot of data massaging.

    xzzy on
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    lazerbeardlazerbeard Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Yeah, I think we were kind of all circling around the same idea, the Cubic-Interpolate function he describes there is a version of cubic spline, as advertised it is guaranteed to give the smoothest results at the cost of a bit of performance.

    As for the random function, you could do something as easy as seed the random number generator with one of your input parameters (or some sort of score determined by multiple input parameters) or you could use some kind of a hash function on your input parameters. I kinda like the seeding idea though, cause it's low work, guaranteed to be random, guaranteed to produce the same output for the same input, and should produce pleasing results.

    lazerbeard on
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    gilraingilrain Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Well, hey, so the basic simulation of the chime strikes, wind, and whatnot is done. Visually, that looks like it's working very nicely. It's time to get some audio up ins. And out-and-out synthesis is my goal, since anything prerecorded will sound fake in its uniformity.

    I researched a bunch, and came up with Csounds as the most established low-level synthesis platform that also had a Python interface. And I put a lot of time into learning its basics, designing a pretty good-sounding chime synth, and then realizing... that somehow, they don't have any documentation of their Python interface. Even their code is poorly documented, so pydoc doesn't help. Even their main C++ API documentation is out of date, so it helps little. And no example code for what I need to do. Wow. Frustrating.

    So. Does anyone know an easier, or at least better documented, way of doing real-time synthesis in Python? In particular, I need to do additive FM synthesis.

    gilrain on
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    PheezerPheezer Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited December 2009
    Guys I gave up on comp sci and went into business stuff and now I do a lot of VBA dev and Access database design and COM object automation and have I sold my soul or what.

    I think my soul is gone, now.

    Pheezer on
    IT'S GOT ME REACHING IN MY POCKET IT'S GOT ME FORKING OVER CASH
    CUZ THERE'S SOMETHING IN THE MIDDLE AND IT'S GIVING ME A RASH
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    SenjutsuSenjutsu thot enthusiast Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    If you're working with Access and VBA, yeah, that's like metastasized soul cancer

    Senjutsu on
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    PheezerPheezer Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited December 2009
    It's so brutal. So brutal. We have Excel 97 deployed on some of our computers. A 12 year old software package.

    I have to write macros to automate reports for people with Excel fucking 97 in mind. Pro-tip: the VBA code that concerns pivot tables is COMPLETELY DIFFERENT AND INCOMPATIBLE between Excel 97 and 2003. It is awful.

    I used to have (a much shittier) job at IBM wherein I got to at least program for Lotus Notes (which is actually really cool from a DBA perspective), Crystal Reports and SQL Server. And I got to do a lot of .NET stuff. And object automation, but everyone had Office 2003 so it wasn't so bad.

    I kind of wish I was still involved in real programming, though. I don't think I've compiled anything in C in about 8 years.

    Pheezer on
    IT'S GOT ME REACHING IN MY POCKET IT'S GOT ME FORKING OVER CASH
    CUZ THERE'S SOMETHING IN THE MIDDLE AND IT'S GIVING ME A RASH
  • Options
    clsCorwinclsCorwin Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    I'm about to graduate comp sci and have realized that the skillset that I have gained are woefully inadequate for the job market in my area.

    clsCorwin on
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    SenjutsuSenjutsu thot enthusiast Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    clsCorwin wrote: »
    I'm about to graduate comp sci and have realized that the skillset that I have gained are woefully inadequate for the job market in my area.

    Most comp sci programs are not intended to be geared towards teaching you trade skills

    You're more or less expected to be doing significant learning and development on your own

    Senjutsu on
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    ಠ_ರೃಠ_ರೃ __BANNED USERS regular
    edited December 2009
    clsCorwin wrote: »
    I'm about to graduate comp sci and have realized that the skillset that I have gained are woefully inadequate for the job market in my area.


    The most useful thing you'll get out of a comp sci degree is how to manage complexity.


    Shit you learn in classes though will be obsolete in a matter of years if not right when you graduate.


    A lot of people though end up in shitty IT jobs for years and years and maybe someday they finally do something cool. Then they retire. *shrug*

    ಠ_ರೃ on
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    PheezerPheezer Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited December 2009
    Yeah, dude. Start training yourself. O'Reilly makes good books. Pick an open source project you can join that uses a technology that you need on your resume, get the book, and join in.

    Pheezer on
    IT'S GOT ME REACHING IN MY POCKET IT'S GOT ME FORKING OVER CASH
    CUZ THERE'S SOMETHING IN THE MIDDLE AND IT'S GIVING ME A RASH
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    templewulftemplewulf The Team Chump USARegistered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Senjutsu wrote: »
    clsCorwin wrote: »
    I'm about to graduate comp sci and have realized that the skillset that I have gained are woefully inadequate for the job market in my area.

    Most comp sci programs are not intended to be geared towards teaching you trade skills

    You're more or less expected to be doing significant learning and development on your own

    I did not learn a goddamn thing from my college classes. I got more use out of google than any of my professors.

    templewulf on
    Twitch.tv/FiercePunchStudios | PSN | Steam | Discord | SFV CFN: templewulf
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    gilraingilrain Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    gilrain wrote: »
    So. Does anyone know an easier, or at least better documented, way of doing real-time synthesis in Python? In particular, I need to do additive FM synthesis.
    Well, after more searching of my own, there really isn't a very good solution for this yet! There's the completely undocumented and arcane Csound, and there's unofficial and similarly unfinished/undocumented support for SuperCollider. It's really a tribute to Python's "batteries included" philosophy and huge third-party module library that my reaction is shock. :P I'm really used to there being a nice, tidy library for anything I could wish.

    Oh well. So, I'm going to resort to using high-quality samples of chimes/tubular bells. It won't be as flexible as synthesis, but it'll still accomplish my basic goal. It'll take a while to gather up a good collection of samples, but I do know they're out there... and there are plenty of commercial packs targeted at musicians, too, if it comes to that.

    gilrain on
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    JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Does anyone know a good OS X SVN client?

    I am currently demoing Versions, but it's 60 dollars. Which is pretty insane.

    I haven't found anything else that is really feature complete and not expensive.

    Jasconius on
  • Options
    PheezerPheezer Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited December 2009
    gilrain wrote: »
    gilrain wrote: »
    So. Does anyone know an easier, or at least better documented, way of doing real-time synthesis in Python? In particular, I need to do additive FM synthesis.
    Well, after more searching of my own, there really isn't a very good solution for this yet! There's the completely undocumented and arcane Csound, and there's unofficial and similarly unfinished/undocumented support for SuperCollider. It's really a tribute to Python's "batteries included" philosophy and huge third-party module library that my reaction is shock. :P I'm really used to there being a nice, tidy library for anything I could wish.

    Oh well. So, I'm going to resort to using high-quality samples of chimes/tubular bells. It won't be as flexible as synthesis, but it'll still accomplish my basic goal. It'll take a while to gather up a good collection of samples, but I do know they're out there... and there are plenty of commercial packs targeted at musicians, too, if it comes to that.

    Could you not rent a mic and a basic mixer, run the line out into your line in, and sample some basic chimes? Then modify them as necessary via something like audacity? And use that as your sample library? I don't know, I just bet it'd be fun to actually make the sounds you're looking for yourself and go from there.

    Pheezer on
    IT'S GOT ME REACHING IN MY POCKET IT'S GOT ME FORKING OVER CASH
    CUZ THERE'S SOMETHING IN THE MIDDLE AND IT'S GIVING ME A RASH
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    LoneIgadzraLoneIgadzra Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    So I am getting really tired of Java programming. I got some decent jobs writing applets and Java EE web applications, but as far as I can tell there is literally nothing cool or fun about the platform at all. The essence of Java seems to be typing until my fingers fall off to get very little done, and JSP is so much worse than other dynamic web page languages, even PHP. Eclipse may be the slowest most bloated IDE ever, and its JSP editor is hilariously awful.
    Jasconius wrote: »
    Does anyone know a good OS X SVN client?

    I am currently demoing Versions, but it's 60 dollars. Which is pretty insane.

    I haven't found anything else that is really feature complete and not expensive.

    What do you mean exactly? I like to fire up terminal and type "svn ..."

    You're looking for a GUI? If Eclipse has an SVN module, that might be one way to go (I know it does CVS pretty well). Other than that, probably have to write one yourself.

    LoneIgadzra on
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    JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    edited January 2010
    I'm actually not using Eclipse for either project. I like a GUI, because I am not a robot.

    The Xcode one is... lacking.

    Jasconius on
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    LoneIgadzraLoneIgadzra Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    Well it's possible to set up Eclipse to just manage your source code. Kind of a pain, but it can be done.

    LoneIgadzra on
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    clsCorwinclsCorwin Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    So what would you guys recommend I dig into first?

    Locally I see a lot of .NET/C# and Objective C.

    clsCorwin on
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    DaedalusDaedalus Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    You're seeing ObjC because that's the language for the iPhone SDK, most likely.

    Daedalus on
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    ಠ_ರೃಠ_ರೃ __BANNED USERS regular
    edited January 2010
    If they are asking for objective C it probably means you will be working on either iPhone stuff, or Mac OS X stuff.

    Objective C is mostly just C and C++ with Java-like object orientation stuff built in, except it's not as restrictive as Java. It's incredibly easy to pick up.

    ಠ_ರೃ on
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    JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    edited January 2010
    clsCorwin wrote: »
    So what would you guys recommend I dig into first?

    Locally I see a lot of .NET/C# and Objective C.

    Probably .NET first. Only because the development tools are better and will give more help to new folk.

    Jasconius on
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    clsCorwinclsCorwin Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    So looking on Amazon I saw a .NET book by Chappell that had good reviews. Anyone second this, or have a different suggestion?

    clsCorwin on
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