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[Shields Up] Computer Security Thread

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Posts

  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    edited February 1
    LD50 wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote: »
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    a5ehren wrote: »
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    Controversial?
    None of the above.

    I use Windows Defender in Win10 and don't have any problems. If you aren't clicking everything in your e-mail, you're probably good.

    If you're hanging around on Win7/8, then Bitdefender and Kaspersky are both rated highly.

    I'm not a huge fan of Kaspersky, but that's less for its effectiveness, and more because of the way it's just totally fucking breaking lately. Safe Money has been causing problems with sites, the certificates Kaspersky uses has been blocking legitimate https sites (like fucking Google)... the program is a mess.

    Which is too bad, because they're great security researchers.

    I've never once used Safe Money--mostly because I know it's going to break every other extension I use in Chrome by design. Hell, the <10 extensions I use in Chrome regularly cause conflicts with Google, including those promoted by Google's Parent Company, because Chrome is fucking bonkers, and I'm an idiot for stubbornly returning to it. That would be my suggestion.
    I recommend anything other than Kaspersky. Use nothing, because installing Kaspersky is basically giving up.

    Kaspersky has been found to exfiltrate data from computers it's installed on, and Russian laws mean that any data they hold is freely available to the Russian government.

    Do not use Kaspersky unless you are comfortable with Putin having access to everything on your PC.

    I'll bite--would you mind elaborating? Out of a morbid curiosity, as I've heard this theory presented before--and I won't lie that it reminds me of family I have overseas that, a ~2 years ago, discarded their phone plans from US-backed companies because, roughly translated from Mandarin, "Don't use these phone plans unless you are comfortable with Obama having access to all your phone conversations." Now, they just don't use cell phones when they visit the US (which admittedly you can actually adapt to fairly easily).

    This is somewhat older and is mostly speculation: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-03-19/cybersecurity-kaspersky-has-close-ties-to-russian-spies

    It's also worth mentioning that one of Kaspersky's upper management people was arrested for treason this month (in Russia, not the US).

    It is worth consideration--though I do like how, for some people (not necessarily anyone in this thread, but you get the meaning), with any further details, this will turn a Russian national they've never met or prior heard of from 1) inherently suspicious, untrustworthy Eastern European probably in cahoots with the only Russian person they know they name of to 2) innocent martyr and victim of an autocratic government, personally singled out by aforementioned name.

    It's sort of like how 3 years ago, when the government issued a scathing critique of Roskosmos (the space agency) that saw a round of firings and recommended dismissals, citing wastefulness and internal and external corruption (endemic problems across multiple areas of governments, sometimes cripplingly so). The comments sections on Engadget (haha, what a shock) were suddenly packed with people crying out that career bureaucrats were being persecuted by a fundamentalist government. :D

    EDIT: Also, I'm very easily amused.

    EDIT EDIT: Also, terrible top. It's surprising to hear that Windows Defender has recovered some of its standing in the field--or at least is less likely to be criticized for being overly invasive than a lot of major products.

    Synthesis on
    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
  • LD50LD50 Registered User regular
    Synthesis wrote: »
    LD50 wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote: »
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    a5ehren wrote: »
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    Controversial?
    None of the above.

    I use Windows Defender in Win10 and don't have any problems. If you aren't clicking everything in your e-mail, you're probably good.

    If you're hanging around on Win7/8, then Bitdefender and Kaspersky are both rated highly.

    I'm not a huge fan of Kaspersky, but that's less for its effectiveness, and more because of the way it's just totally fucking breaking lately. Safe Money has been causing problems with sites, the certificates Kaspersky uses has been blocking legitimate https sites (like fucking Google)... the program is a mess.

    Which is too bad, because they're great security researchers.

    I've never once used Safe Money--mostly because I know it's going to break every other extension I use in Chrome by design. Hell, the <10 extensions I use in Chrome regularly cause conflicts with Google, including those promoted by Google's Parent Company, because Chrome is fucking bonkers, and I'm an idiot for stubbornly returning to it. That would be my suggestion.
    I recommend anything other than Kaspersky. Use nothing, because installing Kaspersky is basically giving up.

    Kaspersky has been found to exfiltrate data from computers it's installed on, and Russian laws mean that any data they hold is freely available to the Russian government.

    Do not use Kaspersky unless you are comfortable with Putin having access to everything on your PC.

    I'll bite--would you mind elaborating? Out of a morbid curiosity, as I've heard this theory presented before--and I won't lie that it reminds me of family I have overseas that, a ~2 years ago, discarded their phone plans from US-backed companies because, roughly translated from Mandarin, "Don't use these phone plans unless you are comfortable with Obama having access to all your phone conversations." Now, they just don't use cell phones when they visit the US (which admittedly you can actually adapt to fairly easily).

    This is somewhat older and is mostly speculation: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-03-19/cybersecurity-kaspersky-has-close-ties-to-russian-spies

    It's also worth mentioning that one of Kaspersky's upper management people was arrested for treason this month (in Russia, not the US).

    It is worth consideration--though I do like how, for some people (not necessarily anyone in this thread, but you get the meaning), with any further details, this will turn a Russian national they've never met or prior heard of from 1) inherently suspicious, untrustworthy Eastern European probably in cahoots with the only Russian person they know they name of to 2) innocent martyr and victim of an autocratic government, personally singled out by aforementioned name.

    It's sort of like how 3 years ago, when the government issued a scathing critique of Roskosmos (the space agency) that saw a round of firings and recommended dismissals, citing wastefulness and internal and external corruption (endemic problems across multiple areas of governments, sometimes cripplingly so). The comments sections on Engadget (haha, what a shock) were suddenly packed with people crying out that career bureaucrats were being persecuted by a fundamentalist government. :D

    EDIT: Also, I'm very easily amused.

    EDIT EDIT: Also, terrible top. It's surprising to hear that Windows Defender has recovered some of its standing in the field--or at least is less likely to be criticized for being overly invasive than a lot of major products.

    Yeah. I understand the point of view you're coming from. The Kaspersky situation is a very real "government might be spying on you" situation though because:

    1. Kaspersky works very very closely with the Russian government. They're a premier consultant for cybersecurity and are directly involved in tracking and persecuting cyber criminals in Russia. The foreign perspective equivalent would be something like "what if Norton primarily worked directly with the NSA".
    2. There are no Russian laws protecting the privacy of American citizens. If Norton or whatever other American company were working with the NSA we'd at least have whatever protections US law grant us.

    Re. Windows defender: I don't even know if it's detection rates are any better or not. It's detection rates could literally be zero and it would be better than most av software because Windows has a vested interest in the security of the program and the integrity of the operating system when it's installed. AV software needs a potentially dangerous level of access to your system in order to do its job and if that software has vulnerabilities you're opening yourself up to entire new attack vectors. Things like the ssl cert vulnerabilities I linked in the previous post compromised the integrity of the web browser. Having Kaspersky installed meant that someone could have redirected your bank website to a malicious clone in chrome and you would have been none the wiser. That particular bug was amateur hour material. Nobody who actually has any web security experience would have ever used 32 bit hashes. The fact that this bug is in security software is incredibly worrying.

  • a5ehrena5ehren AtlantaRegistered User regular
    edited February 1
    Yeah, if you do use an AV, *only* use the scanner program. All the other stuff in there is total garbage.

    Defender doesn't have the best detection rates, but it's still in the upper-80s and won't fuck up your system. FWIW, pretty much every browser dev on the planet says to use Defender because it doesn't break their stuff like the others.

    a5ehren on
    Shadowfire
  • LD50LD50 Registered User regular
    Even the scanners can be dangerous because most of them come with some form of active protection by default. Very few of the av options out there do so using the AV system hooks that Microsoft provides and instead implement it in other much less kosher ways.

    a5ehren
  • AnteCantelopeAnteCantelope Registered User regular
    Synthesis wrote: »
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    a5ehren wrote: »
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    Controversial?
    None of the above.

    I use Windows Defender in Win10 and don't have any problems. If you aren't clicking everything in your e-mail, you're probably good.

    If you're hanging around on Win7/8, then Bitdefender and Kaspersky are both rated highly.

    I'm not a huge fan of Kaspersky, but that's less for its effectiveness, and more because of the way it's just totally fucking breaking lately. Safe Money has been causing problems with sites, the certificates Kaspersky uses has been blocking legitimate https sites (like fucking Google)... the program is a mess.

    Which is too bad, because they're great security researchers.

    I've never once used Safe Money--mostly because I know it's going to break every other extension I use in Chrome by design. Hell, the <10 extensions I use in Chrome regularly cause conflicts with Google, including those promoted by Google's Parent Company, because Chrome is fucking bonkers, and I'm an idiot for stubbornly returning to it. That would be my suggestion.
    I recommend anything other than Kaspersky. Use nothing, because installing Kaspersky is basically giving up.

    Kaspersky has been found to exfiltrate data from computers it's installed on, and Russian laws mean that any data they hold is freely available to the Russian government.

    Do not use Kaspersky unless you are comfortable with Putin having access to everything on your PC.

    I'll bite--would you mind elaborating? Out of a morbid curiosity, as I've heard this theory presented before--and I won't lie that it reminds me of family I have overseas that, a ~2 years ago, discarded their phone plans from US-backed companies because, roughly translated from Mandarin, "Don't use these phone plans unless you are comfortable with Obama having access to all your phone conversations." Now, they just don't use cell phones when they visit the US (which admittedly you can actually adapt to fairly easily).

    Yarovaya law means that “arrangers of information distribution by means of Internet" have to store for 6-12 months all communications, and make them available to authorities.

    Regarding Kaspersky, Jonothan Zdziarski was recently talking about it, saying "Unfortunately, can no longer recommend Kaspersky; they MiTM all your network traffic and there doesn’t appear to be any way to turn it off."
    However, his tweets about it seem to have disappeared, as he's left Twitter because Trump? There's a cached version of part of it here.

  • VoodooVVoodooV Registered User regular
    Using Avast myself. My only issue with it is that it occasionally generates popups trying to induce you to buy the paid version, but it is infrequent enough that it hasn't crossed my threshold for being annoying.

    But ever since I switched to Chrome + Adblock Plus, + Google DNS I don't even remember the last time my virus scanner detected anything. I also use Secunia PSI to notify me of anything that is out of date. What I like about Secunia is that it doesn't care about non-security updates, just updates that fix a CVE

  • WingedWeaselWingedWeasel Registered User regular
    I'm curious what the specifics around Kaspersky are based on what's been said here. If they are mitm'ing data what gets stored? If it is everything from every Kaspersky user everywhere that's an absurd amount of data.

    Assuming the worst, I guess you'd need to treat a Kaspersky uninstall as you would any other deeply entrenched malware and reinstall. I guess?

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  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    What's even more disconcerting is that Best Buy is pushing Kaspersky onto a lot of consumers when they buy any computer-related product. We got the offer when my wife bought her new iPad and now I get reminded by BEST BUY every couple of weeks that I haven't activated my key. More "soccer mom/facebook grandma" types (that sounds more condescending than I mean it to be) would have used their key by now.

  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    Mugsley wrote: »
    What's even more disconcerting is that Best Buy is pushing Kaspersky onto a lot of consumers when they buy any computer-related product. We got the offer when my wife bought her new iPad and now I get reminded by BEST BUY every couple of weeks that I haven't activated my key. More "soccer mom/facebook grandma" types (that sounds more condescending than I mean it to be) would have used their key by now.

    It's a choice of one of three security products - Webroot, Kaspersky, or Trend Micro. I wish MBAM was included, but maybe one day.

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  • EntaruEntaru Registered User regular
    Recommending Trend Micro should be a crime.

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  • TetraNitroCubaneTetraNitroCubane Registered User regular
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    It's a choice of one of three security products - Webroot, Kaspersky, or Trend Micro. I wish MBAM was included, but maybe one day.

    Running periodic on-demand scans with MBAM's free version is still a really good idea.

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    EntaruShadowfire
  • XeddicusXeddicus Registered User regular
    VoodooV wrote: »
    Using Avast myself. My only issue with it is that it occasionally generates popups trying to induce you to buy the paid version, but it is infrequent enough that it hasn't crossed my threshold for being annoying.

    But ever since I switched to Chrome + Adblock Plus, + Google DNS I don't even remember the last time my virus scanner detected anything. I also use Secunia PSI to notify me of anything that is out of date. What I like about Secunia is that it doesn't care about non-security updates, just updates that fix a CVE

    Avast seem to be once a boot/day. Not too bad.

    But it also flags some file from Chromium source files (I'm like 87% sure it's a false positive) and I can't work out how to add exclusions before giving up. I should get back to that.

    "For no one - no one in this world can you trust. Not men. Not women. Not beasts...this you can trust."
  • NightslyrNightslyr Registered User regular
    If one were to just use Windows Defender, would you also use a different, 3rd party software firewall? And if so, which one?

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  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    Entaru wrote: »
    Recommending Trend Micro should be a crime.

    Oh yeah. I never recommend it, though there was a time I would recommend it for Macs because the OSX version of Webroot is a shitshow.

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  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    Xeddicus wrote: »
    VoodooV wrote: »
    Using Avast myself. My only issue with it is that it occasionally generates popups trying to induce you to buy the paid version, but it is infrequent enough that it hasn't crossed my threshold for being annoying.

    But ever since I switched to Chrome + Adblock Plus, + Google DNS I don't even remember the last time my virus scanner detected anything. I also use Secunia PSI to notify me of anything that is out of date. What I like about Secunia is that it doesn't care about non-security updates, just updates that fix a CVE

    Avast seem to be once a boot/day. Not too bad.

    But it also flags some file from Chromium source files (I'm like 87% sure it's a false positive) and I can't work out how to add exclusions before giving up. I should get back to that.

    Might be because there's a fair bit of malware that will install infected versions of Chromium, so Avast is "man, fuck Chromium."

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  • CaedwyrCaedwyr Registered User regular
    Is there any alternative to noScript someone could recommend, or a way of configuring noScript to keep out the bad stuff while allowing the mostly harmless stuff in. With the heavy use of scripts on almost all sites, I find myself allowing through huge numbers of scripts to the point where I'm not sure how much protection noScript is providing. The alternative of not allowing much through means that about 60% of the internet/websites are unusable.

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  • OrcaOrca Registered User regular
    I gave up on noscript years ago. I'm making do with uBlock Origin, RequestPolicy Continued, and Privacy Badger to shore up things.

    Basically, this means I'm relatively safe from hostile scripts originating from ad networks.

    I'm still boned if any first party hostile scripts show up and aren't caught by other defenses.

    This combination is still impressively irritating to configure on some websites however.

    evilthecat wrote: »
    "Bioware I want to suck on your teets of gamingness".

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    Mugsley
  • LD50LD50 Registered User regular
    It's not really possible to 100% protect against nefarious scripts without blanket disallowing them because there isn't a reliable way to determine nefariousness. I mean, if there were it would be built into the Javascript engines and we wouldn't have to worry about it.

  • OrcaOrca Registered User regular
    LD50 wrote: »
    It's not really possible to 100% protect against nefarious scripts without blanket disallowing them because there isn't a reliable way to determine nefariousness. I mean, if there were it would be built into the Javascript engines and we wouldn't have to worry about it.

    If those antivirus companies would just get off their asses and solve the halting problem...!

    evilthecat wrote: »
    "Bioware I want to suck on your teets of gamingness".

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  • PolaritiePolaritie Oh I didn't see this box. Registered User regular
    LD50 wrote: »
    It's not really possible to 100% protect against nefarious scripts without blanket disallowing them because there isn't a reliable way to determine nefariousness. I mean, if there were it would be built into the Javascript engines and we wouldn't have to worry about it.

    Yeah...

    I mean, there are some calls that should be blocked or such (hello file I/O). But that all falls under sandboxing.

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  • XeddicusXeddicus Registered User regular
    edited February 3
    Speaking of sandboxing:

    Firefox won't refresh the visuals of a page until I switch tabs and go back while running in Sandboxie.

    Sandboxie didn't update, so what did Firefox go and do?

    Xeddicus on
    "For no one - no one in this world can you trust. Not men. Not women. Not beasts...this you can trust."
    kaliyama
  • EntaruEntaru Registered User regular
    edited February 3
    Nightslyr wrote: »
    If one were to just use Windows Defender, would you also use a different, 3rd party software firewall? And if so, which one?

    Actually the built in windows firewall is not terrible. I wouldn't worry about using it.

    Firewalls for most general use are a pretty hard to mess up technology. Block all incoming connections unless a program specifically asks to open it.

    Entaru on
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  • a5ehrena5ehren AtlantaRegistered User regular
    Entaru wrote: »
    Nightslyr wrote: »
    If one were to just use Windows Defender, would you also use a different, 3rd party software firewall? And if so, which one?

    Actually the built in windows firewall is not terrible. I wouldn't worry about using it.

    Firewalls for most general use are a pretty hard to mess up technology. Block all incoming connections unless a program specifically asks to open it.

    Yeah, you're going to have a hard time beating a firewall integrated into the OS written by the OS makers. It's like asking if you shouldn't use iptables (or nf_tables or whatever they're calling it now) in Linux.

  • EntaruEntaru Registered User regular
    a5ehren wrote: »
    Entaru wrote: »
    Nightslyr wrote: »
    If one were to just use Windows Defender, would you also use a different, 3rd party software firewall? And if so, which one?

    Actually the built in windows firewall is not terrible. I wouldn't worry about using it.

    Firewalls for most general use are a pretty hard to mess up technology. Block all incoming connections unless a program specifically asks to open it.

    Yeah, you're going to have a hard time beating a firewall integrated into the OS written by the OS makers. It's like asking if you shouldn't use iptables (or nf_tables or whatever they're calling it now) in Linux.

    Well to be fair the version in Windows XP was pretty terrible.

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  • LD50LD50 Registered User regular
    XPs entire networking stack was a garbage fire.

    Entarua5ehrenMugsley
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    edited February 3
    Orca wrote: »
    LD50 wrote: »
    It's not really possible to 100% protect against nefarious scripts without blanket disallowing them because there isn't a reliable way to determine nefariousness. I mean, if there were it would be built into the Javascript engines and we wouldn't have to worry about it.

    If those antivirus companies would just get off their asses and solve the halting problem...!

    You guys should know by now that all nefarious scripts twirl their mustaches while they do their work. #boycottmustaches

    ====
    Also, this works rather well on some "paywall" sites and I don't see any maliciousness in it (I got it from Reddit, so grains of salt...):

    If you have a popup that won't go away, RClick -> Inspect Element (I think Reveal Codes works too). Scroll down to the offending line, RClick -> Delete Node.

    Mugsley on
  • NightslyrNightslyr Registered User regular
    Entaru wrote: »
    Nightslyr wrote: »
    If one were to just use Windows Defender, would you also use a different, 3rd party software firewall? And if so, which one?

    Actually the built in windows firewall is not terrible. I wouldn't worry about using it.

    Firewalls for most general use are a pretty hard to mess up technology. Block all incoming connections unless a program specifically asks to open it.

    Awesome. I've used BitDefender for a few years, but they're expensive, and I'm not convinced that they provide added security given my habits. I'd rather ditch it and save $$ if possible.

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  • XeddicusXeddicus Registered User regular
    Xeddicus wrote: »
    Speaking of sandboxing:

    Firefox won't refresh the visuals of a page until I switch tabs and go back while running in Sandboxie.

    Sandboxie didn't update, so what did Firefox go and do?

    Just in case it helps anyone else:

    This seems to have happened before and you need to set Firefoxes own sandbox setting to 0 in about:config. Which I assume turns it off, but if it's in Sanboxie's already I'm OK with that if it lets me see pages without switching tabs first.

    "For no one - no one in this world can you trust. Not men. Not women. Not beasts...this you can trust."
  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    Out of curiosity, how do people feel about CCleaner?

    Hardly a necessity, but I like it just for its cleaning/uninstalling abilities. Not sure if its reputation's what it used to be.

    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
  • LD50LD50 Registered User regular
    It's bad. If your registry is so fucked that you need a tool to fix it you should just reformat.

    TetraNitroCubaneNightslyra5ehren
  • Mr_RoseMr_Rose 83 Blue Ridge Protects the Holy Registered User regular
    Right, because that's the primary/only purpose of CCleaner?

    We use it almost daily on all sorts of machines, mostly to remove temp files and assorted other cruft that Windows should clean up itself but somehow never quite manages to. Barely ever use the registry tool though and that mostly for the sake of completeness.
    In the right circumstances it's an excellent tool that will save you hours of manual work to do the same job and also make you look like a miracle worker if the only thing wrong was a gazillion temp files messing with their Outlook.

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  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    CCleaner does a better job of cleaning up temp files and other garbage that Windows leaves behind than the built in disk cleanup tool, and it's way way faster. The registry cleaner is kind of garbage, but they all are, so...

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  • LD50LD50 Registered User regular
    In a professional environment I'd rather just reimage the machine. In a personal one the disk cleanup utility has always been fine for temp files and the like. The only thing I've ever used CCleaner for is registry fixes and I've already voiced my opinion on that.

  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    Well, reformatting and reimaging is obviously not an option for a home machine (and it shouldn't be, since I'm not being paid to maintain a system with a GPU that costs more than a modern console by itself). In terms of the registry cleaning tool, I've used that specifically to remove registry entries for uninstalled software that persist afterwards (basic configuration stuff most of the time)--I could do it manually once I figured out the location, but that does take longer.

    Occasionally the uninstall tool is helpful for something that won't uninstall properly through Windows 10 for whatever reason (usually not malice so much as "Yeah, this basic program is free--and we consider the Windows Store to be the modern incarnation of the German Nazi Party--so don't complain about it not having an uninstall routine in this current release."), but that's pretty rare too.

    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    Synthesis wrote: »
    Well, reformatting and reimaging is obviously not an option for a home machine (and it shouldn't be, since I'm not being paid to maintain a system with a GPU that costs more than a modern console by itself). In terms of the registry cleaning tool, I've used that specifically to remove registry entries for uninstalled software that persist afterwards (basic configuration stuff most of the time)--I could do it manually once I figured out the location, but that does take longer.

    Occasionally the uninstall tool is helpful for something that won't uninstall properly through Windows 10 for whatever reason (usually not malice so much as "Yeah, this basic program is free--and we consider the Windows Store to be the modern incarnation of the German Nazi Party--so don't complain about it not having an uninstall routine in this current release."), but that's pretty rare too.

    If I'm looking to uninstall something that's being persistent and I want to rip it out by the roots, I'll use Revo. It's thorough.

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  • VoodooVVoodooV Registered User regular
    while we use imaging all the time at work, we don't casually re-image at the drop of a hat unless there is some really screwball behavior. we use CCleaner all the time mostly just to slightly speed up a machine getting long in the tooth. Even in this day and age, programs don't clean up after themselves well and shit gets left behind that can cause issues.

    We don't expect it to fix major issues, but it does help out.

  • WingedWeaselWingedWeasel Registered User regular
    since combofix apparently isn't getting updated for windows 8.1 or 10, i've started looking into alternatives (specifically for a windows 10 box). i thankfully haven't had to deal with any infections as of late, but that means i'm a little bit out of the game. saw a couple of recommended alternatives on bleepingcomputer but the posts were kinda old.

    is windows defender to be trusted? i know it has improved over time but i havent checked recent evaluations of it, and i doubt i can convince this individual to reformat.

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  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    Yeah, Defender is just fine.

    Run mbam once in a while I guess?

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  • WingedWeaselWingedWeasel Registered User regular
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    Yeah, Defender is just fine.

    Run mbam once in a while I guess?

    that's the route i was going. just out of paranoia i like to have the thorough option (combofix). basically windows defender caught something, claims it appropriately dealt with it but i like to be sure

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