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Exit Interview

Lindsay LohanLindsay Lohan Registered User regular
edited January 2007 in Help / Advice Forum
Well, I quit my job and for the first time in my career, I'm supposed to have an exit interview (scheduled for 1/18/07). As I hate going into things unprepared, just a few questions for you folks...

1.) What might they ask?

2.) Is it ok just to remain "business casual" or should I dress for an interview (it's not upper management in the interview, just my manager's teammate).

3.) I don't want to air out all my grievences because that's a bad note to leave on, but is it still ok to be pretty honest at that point? I feel like it's my only chance to be really honest and give true feedback and wouldn't mind the chance to air out a few issues.

Thanks!

Lindsay Lohan on

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    WeeSneakWeeSneak Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    If you are not gonna be working there no more, then make up some shit about how this job does not fit into my current schedule, or you have family members to take care of. Basically what this means is that you can give these guys as references for your next job, or if another job rings a previous employer and it turns out to be them, they cannot say anything bad about you.

    So basically lie through your teeth, and make it seem like you are sad leaving the job yet you have no choice.

    PS.For these things it mostly is business casual, as they are doing it for themselves to improve working standards and to find out possible problems, not for you.

    WeeSneak on
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    DrezDrez Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Lambaste them.

    And I totally disagree with WeeSneak, like 50 million percent. I'm assuming you're in the US? A company generally isn't allowed reflect negatively on you if asked for a reference...they can simply refuse to provide a character assessment. And you have your exit interview with HR generally, and you don't generally look to HR for your references, you look to your coworkers/superiors/managers.

    An exit interview just gives the company an idea of what the fuck they are doing wrong to be losing employees voluntarily. You are actually doing the company a good deed if you tell them how awful they and their management staff are.

    It's the perfect opportunity to air your frustrations. Don't jump on the desk and start ranting, but be calm and honest about your feelings and reasons for leaving.

    Drez on
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    YodaTunaYodaTuna Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Drez wrote:
    Lambaste them.

    And I totally disagree with WeeSneak, like 50 million percent. I'm assuming you're in the US? A company generally isn't allowed reflect negatively on you if asked for a reference...they can simply refuse to provide a character assessment.

    While this is correct, someone calling for references is going to be like "What the fuck did this person do that they refuse to give a reference?"

    YodaTuna on
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    Lindsay LohanLindsay Lohan Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Actually, my interview is with one of the managers in the call center, but just at the level of immediately manager, and someone I'd be very comfortable sharing information with. My company won't give references anyway - they just verify employment and verify if someone would be elligible for rehire.

    I have a couple of very close friends that still work here and I feel like maybe I can at least give some input to help make their lives easier - although I'm sure my suggestions will fall on deaf ears considering that's one of my complaints :)

    Lindsay Lohan on
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    CyberJackalCyberJackal Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    1. They are going to ask you exactly what you expect - Why are you leaving? How would you rate your employment in regards to x, y, and z? Etc.
    2. I assume you'll be working that day same as usual? Just wear what you normally wear to work.
    3. Be honest. What are they going to do, fire you? But seriously, there's really no reason not to be.

    CyberJackal on
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    Captain VashCaptain Vash Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Just to be clear, in the U.S. at least a previous employer giving out any more information than a confirmation of dates employed can be seen as slander and so prosecuted against in a court of law.

    So yeah...

    Captain Vash on
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    MithrandirselfMithrandirself Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    there is no reason not to be honest unless your honesty involves taking C4, or another type of explosive to the bridge that would allow you to talk to the people at the buisness ever again.

    Make no mistake No One likes critisizm. So think about the the nicest way to say the things you feel are absolutely nessicary, cut out any of the little or medium level crap, especially if it is something you know is more a personal peeve to you.

    That being said, definitely have "something" to say thats makes some sort of reason out of why you are leaving.

    Other than that relax, do like you would any other day of the week, except perhaps don't daydream during the exit interview itself.

    Mithrandirself on
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    CyberJackalCyberJackal Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Oh right, I forgot to say don't be a jerk about it. Sometimes I forget that it needs to be said... :lol:

    CyberJackal on
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    Lindsay LohanLindsay Lohan Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Oh right, I forgot to say don't be a jerk about it. Sometimes I forget that it needs to be said... :lol:

    Yeah - well, that was my concern. I didn't want to leave on a bad note. However, I've been in the call center for 4.5 years and have some pretty strong opinions as to where they've gone wrong. I'm sure given a week to prepare I can turn those around into positive suggestions instead of simply whiney complaints :)

    I suppose "I'm going to be 30 in a few weeks and this place was a dead end sucking the life out of me" would be too negative?

    Lindsay Lohan on
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    DrezDrez Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Just to be clear, in the U.S. at least a previous employer giving out any more information than a confirmation of dates employed can be seen as slander and so prosecuted against in a court of law.

    So yeah...

    I wasn't sure if that was true in every state or just Employment at Will states which is why I was vague, but I appreciate the clarification...that's exactly what I understood as well.

    Drez on
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    sarksark Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Be professional, but I'd tell them exactly what you think about the company, it's managers, etc.

    So, say what you feel, but don't go, `I hate all you fuckers! Die in a fire cunt-rags!'

    It's not going to hurt your employment opportunities in the future.

    sark on
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    CyberJackalCyberJackal Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Herby wrote:
    Oh right, I forgot to say don't be a jerk about it. Sometimes I forget that it needs to be said... :lol:

    Yeah - well, that was my concern. I didn't want to leave on a bad note. However, I've been in the call center for 4.5 years and have some pretty strong opinions as to where they've gone wrong. I'm sure given a week to prepare I can turn those around into positive suggestions instead of simply whiney complaints :)

    I suppose "I'm going to be 30 in a few weeks and this place was a dead end sucking the life out of me" would be too negative?

    You don't have to wrack your brain coming up with suggestions, but like sark says just be professional. This is really just about attitude. Instead of saying "I'm going to be 30 in a few weeks and this place was a dead end sucking the life out of me.", say "I see my career taking a different direction." :P

    But yeah, still be honest with the criticism. If they didn't want to hear it, they wouldn't have an exit interview in the first place. Not all companies do.

    CyberJackal on
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    EggyToastEggyToast Jersey CityRegistered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Yeah, you can use the exit interview as you like. If you plan to use that person as an immediate reference, it's usually best to leave on a more positive note. Of course, you rarely leave a job because you like the work.

    In other words, as everyone above is saying, be professional, but don't be afraid to be honest. It's ok, and preferred, to say things like "I understand that a call center isn't the best job in the world, but X policy and the way Y is typically handled is draconian. I like the people I worked with but the focus by management on Z is, in my opinion, myopic and would be better served looking towards increasing ZZ."

    EggyToast on
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    JWFokkerJWFokker Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Herby wrote:
    "I'm going to be 30 in a few weeks and this place was a dead end sucking the life out of me" would be too negative?

    "No/not enough room for advancement." is the preferred nomenclature.

    JWFokker on
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    CrossBusterCrossBuster Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Just to be clear, in the U.S. at least a previous employer giving out any more information than a confirmation of dates employed can be seen as slander and so prosecuted against in a court of law.

    So yeah...
    Not prosecuted. You can only be prosecuted for crimes.

    Slander is a tort.

    And, if what I remember from my employment law class in college (I don't remember much of anything from college) is correct, communications between former and prospective employers are privileged, meaning that they can say pretty much whatever they want, as long as they don't act with malice. This may only be the case here in California, though.

    CrossBuster on
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    SarcastroSarcastro Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Be wary of what you say in your exit interview, especially if you plan to go back into the same theme of business.

    Officially employers do not give out anything more then employed dates and absenteeism reports, but unofficially managers share vast amounts of employee information with thier friends, and most managers in the corporate world are very connected with others.

    This is especially true of HR managers who, aside from being very connected with each other (HR is akin to being in a corporate cult), exchange their thoughts and opinions on workers over lunch and meetings and other social networking hoohah like you wouldn't believe.

    You can be honest, but don't use 'just being honest' as an excuse to be an ass. These things tend to come around back to you in the end.

    Sarcastro on
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    tsmvengytsmvengy Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    To echo what others have said, go for something in the middle. Saying "it doesn't fit my schedule" doesn't help anyone if that's just a lie. Companies have exit interviews partially because they want to find out why people leave. Also, I wouldn't attempt to burn all the bridges while you get out. As others have said, "don't be a jerk." Pick some grievances that you have and talk about them (in a civil manner) and then go on your way.

    tsmvengy on
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