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Bush: "Iraqi people owe the Americans..."

BasarBasar IstanbulRegistered User regular
edited January 2007 in Debate and/or Discourse
Bush: "Iraqi people owe the American people a huge debt of gratitude"
WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Congress cannot reverse last week's decision to send 21,000 more troops to Iraq, President Bush said in an interview intended to rally popular support for his plan.

"Frankly, that's not their responsibility," Bush said in an interview on the CBS News program "60 Minutes," which aired Sunday.

"It's my responsibility to put forward the plan that I think will succeed. I believe if they start trying to cut off funds, they better explain to the American people and the soldiers why their plan will succeed," the president said.

Some Democrats, including Massachusetts Sen. Edward Kennedy, have called on Congress to block Bush from committing more troops to Iraq, either by limiting the number of troops that can be committed or by cutting off funds for further deployments. (Watch congressional reaction to plan )

Asked if he believes that he, as commander-in-chief of the armed forces, has the authority to order troops to Iraq in the face of congressional opposition, Bush said, "In this situation, I do, yeah."

"I fully understand they could try to stop me from doing it," he said. "But I made my decision, and we're going forward."

He said Iraqis should be thankful for all the United States has done for them since the invasion nearly four years ago.

"I think I am proud of the efforts we did," Bush said.

"We liberated that country from a tyrant. I think the Iraqi people owe the American people a huge debt of gratitude. That's the problem here in America: They wonder whether or not there is a gratitude level that's significant enough in Iraq."

As he did in his Wednesday speech, when he announced the deployment of more troops to the nearly 4-year-old war, Bush acknowledged his administration made mistakes in Iraq.

Bush allowed that low troop levels "could have been a mistake," that led to a widespread breakdown in law and order after the March 2003 invasion. The president also cited other mistakes, including the abuse of inmates at the notorious Abu Ghraib prison -- where pictures of U.S. troops mistreating prisoners led to international condemnation -- and his use of "bad language" like his July 2003 challenge to the then-budding insurgency: "Bring 'em on."

"I think history is going to look back and see a lot of ways we could have done things better. No question about it," he said. But despite the mistakes, he said he did not feel he owes the Iraqi people an apology.

"Not at all," he told CBS.

With his popularity ratings in the gutter and support for the war flagging, Bush said he recognizes that the war "hadn't gone as well as I had hoped at this point in time." But he said the dismal reviews do not affect his outlook.

"Quite the contrary. My spirits are strong, and I'm-- I'm-- I'm-- I'm blessed to be the president," he said.

"I really am not the kind of guy that sits here and says, 'Oh, gosh, I'm worried about my legacy.' I'm more worried about making the right decisions to protect the United States of America. See, we're in a war. People want to come and attack you and attack our country. I understand criticism. But I've got a pretty thick hide."

The president bridled at the suggestion that he has been less than forthcoming with the American people about such matters as the existence of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq, the lack of any connection between the September 11, 2001 attacks and Iraq, and predictions that the war would cost about $50 billion -- far short of the current $400 billion price tag.

"I strongly reject that this administration hasn't been straight with the American people," he said. "The minute we found out they didn't have weapons of mass destruction, I was the first to say so."

And he rejected a growing chorus of calls for U.S. forces to leave the country to the Iraqis to sort out for themselves -- a view held by some Americans.

"I would hope they'd want us to succeed before we get out," he said. "If the government falls apart, it'll invite Iran into the Shiite neighborhoods, Sunnis, Sunni extremists into the Sunni neighborhoods, Kurdish separatist movements."

He also rejected the suggestion that the U.S. invasion created more instability in Iraq than it eliminated.

"Well, our administration took care of a source of instability in Iraq," he said. "Envision a world in which Saddam Hussein was rushing for a nuclear weapon to compete against Iran."

Both U.S. and UN officials have said since the invasion that Saddam Hussein's nuclear program was dismantled after the 1991 Gulf War.

A CIA-led survey of Iraq's weapons programs concluded in 2004 that then-Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein had halted work toward a nuclear bomb in 1991, under U.N. sanctions that ended the Persian Gulf War.

Bush said he was discouraged by video of Saddam Hussein's hanging showing the Sunni being taunted by Shiite guards moments before the execution. "They could have handled it a lot better," he said.

Bush, who has said he does not use e-mail, said he watched the video on the Internet, but turned away before the ousted dictator fell through the trap door of the gallows.

Basically, the keypoint is, Dubya thinks!

Wow, this guy is on a total power trip: "They cannot stop me."

http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/01/14/bush.60.minutes/index.html

:roll:

i live in a country with a batshit crazy president and no, english is not my first language

Basar on
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Posts

  • His CorkinessHis Corkiness Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    "Envision a world in which Saddam Hussein was rushing for a nuclear weapon to compete against Iran."
    I'm envisioning


    Am I supposed to be relating this to the invasion of Iraq or something, because I ain't seeing it


    I am seeing unicorns, though

    His Corkiness on
  • Juergen HubertJuergen Hubert Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    "I think history is going to look back and see a lot of ways we could have done things better. No question about it," he said.

    Unfortunately, the "things they could have done better" weren't just visible in hindsight - plenty of people saw what was coming from a long way off.

    Here is something I wrote on May 25th in 2003:
    See, I don't believe that the current US government is capable of transforming Iraq into a stable and democratic government, no matter what Bush Junior promises. Their comparisons to postwar Japan and Germany are faulty. First off, both countries had democratic forms of government before, however flawed they were, and thus there were enough natives familiar with democracy to start over. Iraq has never been democratic in the first place, and thus there will be few able politicians who genuinely believe in the spirit of democracy. Second, both nations were genuinely unified, and when the leaders surrendered, the entire country followed suit. Iraq, on the other hand, is a mess of multiple and mutually antagonistic ethnic groups (the Kurds are only the most prominent example), and once the brutal oppression through the central government fell away, they start jockeying for influence against each other to gain as many advantages for themselves as possible, without any regard for the whole of Iraq. And that's perhaps understandable, for what did Iraq ever do to create any kind of national loyalty?

    And third, the Marshall Plan happened a long time ago, and the USA do not really have the knowledge to rebuild a foreign nation from the ground up anymore. Sure, they have gotten pretty efficient at toppling governments, but that's all. It's not exactly encouraging that Bush didn't ask Congress for any of the money that he promised to the new and fragile Afghan government. And much of the American foreign aid is simply used to prop up foreign leaders that support the US agenda, instead of helping the suffering people themselves...
    So what will happen in Iraq after this war is over?

    I predict a US military rule of Iraq that has to stay for many years and which has to use increasingly repressive methods to enforce stability, all the while they are being attacked by suicide bombers and other Moslem fanatics who will have added an occupied Iraq to an occupied Palestine on their list of grievances.. Eventually, the whole affair will be so costly in terms of both money and American lives that the USA will simply pull out and leave Iraq to its own devices, after which a bloody civil war will erupt which will last until a new warlord gathers enough power to step into Saddam Hussein´s footsteps... Yes, Saddam Hussein is gone, one way or another - but will it be worth the loss of thousands, if not tens of thousands of lives if another dictator rises in his place?

    I don't think so.

    My thoughts go out to the Iraqis who suffered first under Saddam Hussein, and now under this war - and my fellow soldiers in the US and British armies. May you return soon, safe and whole.

    Unfortunately it seems that I was more right than wrong.

    Juergen Hubert on
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  • ToadTheMushroomToadTheMushroom Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Im sad Britain got dragged into this. We are as much at fault as anyone.

    Not that I am supporting the Iraqis, but goddam history will not be kind to the Americans in this war. Not at all.

    ToadTheMushroom on
  • AldoAldo Hippo Hooray Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    "I think I am proud of the efforts we did," Bush said.

    Such self-esteem. ;)

    Anyway, are we supposed to discuss anything here, or should we just wait for a pro-Bush-guy to stop by so we can all mock him?

    Aldo on
  • ViolentChemistryViolentChemistry __BANNED USERS regular
    edited January 2007
    Im sad Britain got dragged into this. We are as much at fault as anyone.

    Not that I am supporting the Iraqis, but goddam history will not be kind to the Americans in this war. Not at all.
    Of course not. I'm the one who's going to write it.

    ViolentChemistry on
  • DelzhandDelzhand Hard to miss. Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Im sad Britain got dragged into this. We are as much at fault as anyone.

    Not that I am supporting the Iraqis, but goddamn history will not be kind to the American administration in this war. Not at all.

    Fixed, with any luck.

    Delzhand on
  • His CorkinessHis Corkiness Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Delzhand wrote:
    Im sad Britain got dragged into this. We are as much at fault as anyone.

    Not that I am supporting the Iraqis, but goddamn history will not be kind to the American administration in this war. Not at all.

    Fixed, with any luck.
    Remember a while back when people were trying to blame the American public for the war?

    Yeah.

    His Corkiness on
  • ToadTheMushroomToadTheMushroom Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Delzhand wrote:
    Im sad Britain got dragged into this. We are as much at fault as anyone.

    Not that I am supporting the Iraqis, but goddamn history will not be kind to the American administration in this war. Not at all.

    Fixed, with any luck.

    You're right. My mistake.

    I know a lot of American people, and they are all good folk, but the government is a sack of shit, corrupt and blinded by its own greed.

    Seriously, one day they will go too far and it will all go to hell Children of Men stylee.

    ToadTheMushroom on
  • ViolentChemistryViolentChemistry __BANNED USERS regular
    edited January 2007
    Delzhand wrote:
    Im sad Britain got dragged into this. We are as much at fault as anyone.

    Not that I am supporting the Iraqis, but goddamn history will not be kind to the American administration in this war. Not at all.

    Fixed, with any luck.
    I'm actually planning to retcon this administration right out of existence and simply refer to this period as "the Neo-Con Dark-Ages".

    ViolentChemistry on
  • desperaterobotsdesperaterobots perth, ausRegistered User regular
    edited January 2007
    "We liberated that country from a tyrant. I think the Iraqi people owe the American people a huge debt of gratitude. That's the problem here in America: They wonder whether or not there is a gratitude level that's significant enough in Iraq."

    WHAT.

    The American people aren't mad at me! They're mad at those ungrateful fuckers in Iraq! If only the EYE-RACK-EYS understood how to say thankyou for what we'd gone done! Why aren't they more proud of the efforts we did(?!)

    Fucking hell, the most powerful man in the world is an illiterate fool sending people to their deaths for nothing. Why has there been no uprising?! WHY!

    ... Rant: Off. A thousand sighs. I don't know if I have enough compassion to go around to all the soldiers and people who are yet to die because of this tomfoolery. Can I donate money somewhere?

    desperaterobots on
  • iTunesIsEviliTunesIsEvil Cornfield? Cornfield.Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Delzhand wrote:
    Im sad Britain got dragged into this. We are as much at fault as anyone.

    Not that I am supporting the Iraqis, but goddamn history will not be kind to the American administration in this war. Not at all.

    Fixed, with any luck.
    I really think (lolz) that would take a lot of luck. As it is it's our fault that Bush is in office, and from the small amount of talking with people outside the US I've done, they really think we're a bunch of collective idjits.

    iTunesIsEvil on
  • Juergen HubertJuergen Hubert Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Remember a while back when people were trying to blame the American public for the war?

    Well, the American public did vote this guy into office, and even re-elected him.

    It's different under a dictatorship, but to my mind in a democracy the voters do share in some of the responsibility for the actions of their leaders. Otherwise, what's the point?

    To quote Terry Pratchett, no practical definition of freedom is complete without the freedom to take the consequences.

    Juergen Hubert on
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  • His CorkinessHis Corkiness Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Remember a while back when people were trying to blame the American public for the war?

    Well, the American public did vote this guy into office, and even re-elected him.

    It's different under a dictatorship, but to my mind in a democracy the voters do share in some of the responsibility for the actions of their leaders. Otherwise, what's the point?

    To quote Terry Pratchett, no practical definition of freedom is complete without the freedom to take the consequences.
    I understand what you mean, but I was actually referring to Americans (Whether they were White House reps or just members of the media I can't remember) blaming the American public for the outcome of the war. As in, it went badly because the public didn't believe in it or something.

    Sorry, I should've been clearer.

    His Corkiness on
  • ShintoShinto __BANNED USERS regular
    edited January 2007
    Extra! Extra! George Bush sucks!

    World stunned by shocking revelation!

    Shinto on
  • siliconenhancedsiliconenhanced __BANNED USERS regular
    edited January 2007
    Remember a while back when people were trying to blame the American public for the war?

    Well, the American public did vote this guy into office, and even re-elected him.

    It's different under a dictatorship, but to my mind in a democracy the voters do share in some of the responsibility for the actions of their leaders. Otherwise, what's the point?

    To quote Terry Pratchett, no practical definition of freedom is complete without the freedom to take the consequences.
    I understand what you mean, but I was actually referring to Americans (Whether they were White House reps or just members of the media I can't remember) blaming the American public for the outcome of the war. As in, it went badly because the public didn't believe in it or something.

    Sorry, I should've been clearer.

    Hey, its not like Jenna and Barbara aren't doing they're part. They're international ambassadors for the United States of PARTY DOWN.

    In other news, Prince Harry threatened to resign his commission if he wasn't sent to Iraq with his men. Who says noblisse oblidge is dead?

    siliconenhanced on
  • piLpiL Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Remember a while back when people were trying to blame the American public for the war?

    Well, the American public did vote this guy into office, and even re-elected him.

    It's different under a dictatorship, but to my mind in a democracy the voters do share in some of the responsibility for the actions of their leaders. Otherwise, what's the point?

    To quote Terry Pratchett, no practical definition of freedom is complete without the freedom to take the consequences.

    You're correct. Too many stupid people in this country, but pastures aren't greener for me anywhere else.

    Also silicon, that is kind of badass. There could be some seriously cool paintings of Prince Henry as a result.

    piL on
  • OverlardOverlard Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Remember a while back when people were trying to blame the American public for the war?

    Well, the American public did vote this guy into office, and even re-elected him.

    It's different under a dictatorship, but to my mind in a democracy the voters do share in some of the responsibility for the actions of their leaders. Otherwise, what's the point?

    To quote Terry Pratchett, no practical definition of freedom is complete without the freedom to take the consequences.
    I understand what you mean, but I was actually referring to Americans (Whether they were White House reps or just members of the media I can't remember) blaming the American public for the outcome of the war. As in, it went badly because the public didn't believe in it or something.

    Sorry, I should've been clearer.

    Hey, its not like Jenna and Barbara aren't doing they're part. They're international ambassadors for the United States of PARTY DOWN.

    In other news, Prince Harry threatened to resign his commission if he wasn't sent to Iraq with his men. Who says noblisse oblidge is dead?
    Noblisse oblidge or not, he's still a dick.

    Overlard on
    mario.png
  • CouscousCouscous Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Delzhand wrote:
    Im sad Britain got dragged into this. We are as much at fault as anyone.

    Not that I am supporting the Iraqis, but goddamn history will not be kind to the American administration in this war. Not at all.

    Fixed, with any luck.
    I'm actually planning to retcon this administration right out of existence and simply refer to this period as "the Neo-Con Dark-Ages".
    Crisis on Infinite Administrations?

    Couscous on
  • Irond WillIrond Will WARNING: NO HURTFUL COMMENTS, PLEASE!!!!! Cambridge. MAModerator mod
    edited January 2007
    THis whole sentiment - that the Iraqis should be grateful to the US - is a big part of why the war is regarded as a failure by so many. The constant theme you hear repeated is the US is a barrage of insults leveled at the Iraqis because they're not doing what we want them to do.

    Democracy requires a social contract, and this cannot be imposed.

    Irond Will on
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  • fjafjanfjafjan Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    So ... I guess I stopped being upset by these things, I mean shit, atleast whe it comes to Bush, maybe if he demanded to bring iraqis to his farm in Texas to shoot them i'd be a bit upset, but yeah, he's so fucking stupid he thinks he is some sort of saviour to the people he brought into a really fucking bloody civil war, and destabilized because he had no fucking idea what he was doing.
    Admitting fault OUGHT to at SOME POINT be a better political move then just argue that you have not. But maybe not.
    Fuck it

    fjafjan on
    Yepp, THE Fjafjan (who's THE fjafjan?)
    - "Proving once again the deadliest animal of all ... is the Zoo Keeper" - Philip J Fry
  • Juergen HubertJuergen Hubert Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Hey, its not like Jenna and Barbara aren't doing they're part. They're international ambassadors for the United States of PARTY DOWN.

    I've often seen the notion that Bush's daughters should either speak out against the policies of their father or join the military or otherwise do something just because they are the daughters of the President. But truth to be told, I never saw a good argument for this. Why should the relatives of a politician be obligated to do anything related to politics. After all, they weren't elected - he was.

    For a counterexample, you only need to take a look at Joachim Sauer, the husband of Angela Merkel. He wasn't with her during election night, he doesn't accompany her to photo ops, and in fact he refuses any requests for interviews that don't have to do with scientific topics (he is a Professor of Chemistry). He keeps his private life private. Now that is an attitude I can respect.

    Isn't one of the points of having a democracy that you don't have to deal with the soap operatic lives of aristocrats?

    Juergen Hubert on
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  • QinguQingu Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Wasn't there some poll a while back that showed that 6 out of 10 Iraqis are so "unthankful" for the job that America has done that they actually support killing American soldiers?

    If 6 out of 10 Iraqis believe Americans are enemy occupiers that should be killed, then complaining about them not being thankful is like complaining that Osama bin Laden uses offensive generalizations in his fatwas.

    Qingu on
  • Loren MichaelLoren Michael Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    titmouse wrote:
    Crisis on Infinite Administrations?

    jesus, that would be a crisis.

    i think it would be awesome if a Cheney Prime to came in and, maddened by our inability to use the military effectively, started blasting everyone in washington with birdshot, only to be later imprisoned for eternity in guantanamo surrounded by 40 9/11 conspiracy theorists.

    Loren Michael on
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  • GoslingGosling Looking Up Soccer In Mongolia Right Now, Probably Watertown, WIRegistered User regular
    edited January 2007
    They don't owe us squat, Bush. We're the ones that owe. We owe them an apology, we owe them a drop on our knees and a beg for forgiveness, we owe them a stable country again (a debt which we will not be able to pay), we owe them a promise to get out of their hair and STAY out of their hair for the next couple hundred years, we owe hundreds of billions of dollars for conducting it.

    To say they owe us a damn thing is the most asinine thing I've heard so far this year. And GRATITUDE? Shut. The fuck. Up.

    Gosling on
    I have a new soccer blog The Minnow Tank. Reading it psychically kicks Sepp Blatter in the bean bag.
  • ThaiboxerThaiboxer Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    I would think a large portion of his voter base came from people who have a house hold income in the 200K+ neighbourhood. The huge tax breaks he rolled out in his first term, basically made his re-election greed based rather than stupidity based. Now the first election, comon...after the whole Florida issue, the American should get a free pass on that one ;)

    Thaiboxer on
    Playing WoW "only when you are bored" is like smoking "only when you are drinking".
  • Irond WillIrond Will WARNING: NO HURTFUL COMMENTS, PLEASE!!!!! Cambridge. MAModerator mod
    edited January 2007
    Thaiboxer wrote:
    I would think a large portion of his voter base came from people who have a house hold income in the 200K+ neighbourhood. The huge tax breaks he rolled out in his first term, basically made his re-election greed based rather than stupidity based. Now the first election, comon...after the whole Florida issue, the American should get a free pass on that one ;)
    There just aren't enough 200k+ households for these to be a significant portion of the voter base. Also, the voting split in richies was smaller than you'd expect (remember that urban incomes are higer than others). The demographic skew was mostly attributable to geography (region and urban/ suburban/ rural), some age, religious identification, level of education and, of course, political identification.

    Irond Will on
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  • SUPERSUGASUPERSUGA Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Fucking hell, the most powerful man in the world is an illiterate fool sending people to their deaths for nothing. Why has there been no uprising?! WHY!
    Literally as I was reading this post I skipped on iTunes and the shuffle brought up "Rage Against the Machine - Take the Power Back".

    Weird.

    SUPERSUGA on
  • CantidoCantido Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    There just aren't enough 200k+ households for these to be a significant portion of the voter base. Also, the voting split in richies was smaller than you'd expect (remember that urban incomes are higer than others).

    I wonder what the voter turnout will be in the future? It keeps rising, doesn't it?

    Cantido on
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  • CptKemzikCptKemzik Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    As much as I try to tolerate Bush (due to most anti-Bush people I know being complete tools), its utter shit like this that makes me slap my forehead and wonder what it would've been like had Bush not started this whole Iraq fiasco.

    CptKemzik on
  • Andrew_JayAndrew_Jay Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Cantido wrote:
    There just aren't enough 200k+ households for these to be a significant portion of the voter base. Also, the voting split in richies was smaller than you'd expect (remember that urban incomes are higer than others).
    I wonder what the voter turnout will be in the future? It keeps rising, doesn't it?
    The higher turnout in 2004 was an anomoly, I understand. Overall it has been steadily decreasing.

    Andrew_Jay on
  • Lindsay LohanLindsay Lohan Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Thaiboxer wrote:
    I would think a large portion of his voter base came from people who have a house hold income in the 200K+ neighbourhood. The huge tax breaks he rolled out in his first term, basically made his re-election greed based rather than stupidity based. Now the first election, comon...after the whole Florida issue, the American should get a free pass on that one ;)

    Truthfully, I think that it's more of a sign of how divided our partisan politics have gotten our country and less about income. I think alot of people voted for Bush because they were afraid of how liberal Kerry had been painted. They weren't happy with Bush's war policies, but they certainly didn't want someone in office that was going to push things too far away from where they saw the moral center of the US. It's sad but the 2 party structure has reached an apex that really seems to be destroying everyone's trust in the government on both sides of the fence.

    It's likely an overstatement, but the feeling I got in the last election was that many that voted Kerry were voting against Bush, not for Kerry. Also, many that voted to keep Bush really seemed to have this picture that if Mr. Liberal got elected than people would be having abortions to the 300th trimester and forcing us all into gay marriages.

    It's going to sound like censorship, but I think the only real solution is much stricter policies on political campaigns and 3rd party political ads to get the country back on track. I think if the elections stayed more focused and messages were given our more clearly that Bush wouldn't have been re-elected - quite frankly I doubt Bush or Kerry would have ever even have been their party's candidates.

    Lindsay Lohan on
  • Irond WillIrond Will WARNING: NO HURTFUL COMMENTS, PLEASE!!!!! Cambridge. MAModerator mod
    edited January 2007
    Andrew_Jay wrote:
    The higher turnout in 2004 was an anomoly, I understand. Overall it has been steadily decreasing.
    2006 was high turnout.

    Irond Will on
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  • Andrew_JayAndrew_Jay Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Irond Will wrote:
    Andrew_Jay wrote:
    The higher turnout in 2004 was an anomoly, I understand. Overall it has been steadily decreasing.
    2006 was high turnout.
    My bad, I was only thinking of presidential elections.

    Andrew_Jay on
  • flamebroiledchickenflamebroiledchicken Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    SUPERSUGA wrote:
    Fucking hell, the most powerful man in the world is an illiterate fool sending people to their deaths for nothing. Why has there been no uprising?! WHY!
    Literally as I was reading this post I skipped on iTunes and the shuffle brought up "Rage Against the Machine - Take the Power Back".

    Weird.

    Man, I can't believe RatM missed the entire Bush administration, when we needed them the most.

    flamebroiledchicken on
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  • Irond WillIrond Will WARNING: NO HURTFUL COMMENTS, PLEASE!!!!! Cambridge. MAModerator mod
    edited January 2007
    SUPERSUGA wrote:
    Fucking hell, the most powerful man in the world is an illiterate fool sending people to their deaths for nothing. Why has there been no uprising?! WHY!
    Literally as I was reading this post I skipped on iTunes and the shuffle brought up "Rage Against the Machine - Take the Power Back".

    Weird.

    Man, I can't believe RatM missed the entire Bush administration, when we needed them the most.

    Final score:

    Machine:1 Rage:0

    Irond Will on
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  • nexuscrawlernexuscrawler Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    I find Bush's ego never ceases to amaze me.

    Didn't he say the mistakes in Iraq belong to him a few days ago? He's already trying to deflect the blame to everyone else again.

    seriously do no one really take responsibility anymore?

    nexuscrawler on
  • GlyphGlyph Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    One thing the American and Iraqi people have in common is their inability to vote Bush out of office. So what does he care what either of them think at this point?

    Glyph on
  • CorvusCorvus . VancouverRegistered User regular
    edited January 2007
    CptKemzik wrote:
    As much as I try to tolerate Bush (due to most anti-Bush people I know being complete tools), its utter shit like this that makes me slap my forehead and wonder what it would've been like had Bush not started this whole Iraq fiasco.

    Well, the Taliban might not still be a major force in Afghanistan. Maybe Osama would actually have been caught.

    Corvus on
    :so_raven:
  • [Tycho?][Tycho?] As elusive as doubt Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Irond Will wrote:
    SUPERSUGA wrote:
    Fucking hell, the most powerful man in the world is an illiterate fool sending people to their deaths for nothing. Why has there been no uprising?! WHY!
    Literally as I was reading this post I skipped on iTunes and the shuffle brought up "Rage Against the Machine - Take the Power Back".

    Weird.

    Man, I can't believe RatM missed the entire Bush administration, when we needed them the most.

    Final score:

    Machine:1 Rage:0

    :cry:

    [Tycho?] on
    mvaYcgc.jpg
  • DeepQantasDeepQantas Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Andrew_Jay wrote:
    Cantido wrote:
    There just aren't enough 200k+ households for these to be a significant portion of the voter base. Also, the voting split in richies was smaller than you'd expect (remember that urban incomes are higer than others).
    I wonder what the voter turnout will be in the future? It keeps rising, doesn't it?
    The higher turnout in 2004 was an anomoly, I understand. Overall it has been steadily decreasing.
    I don't think we'll know for sure until 2010. It *is* quite a big anomaly.

    DeepQantas on
    m~
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