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Green Lantern: DCnU-style

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    HadjiQuestHadjiQuest Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    But he was older again in recent times, was he not?

    Did you guys read it? It's not a full de-aging, just a soft one like Johns has done to Barry and Iris in the current Flash run. Ray is just suddenly depicted as being around 10 or so years younger than he was, and that is that. And sort of like Barry, it probably won't even apply to DCU stories with Ray in them, just this one-shot and the following backups.

    I'm still bummed about Ryan Choi, but Ray Palmer is my Atom fo sho'

    Actually, the one shot felt even more 70s than anything Johns or Waid ever did.

    HadjiQuest on
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    MunchMunch Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    HadjiQuest wrote: »
    Also, I dug the Atom special as well. Was it just Atom: Rebirth? Yah. Was it even written in a Geoff Johnsian style, with Johnsian prose and tropes? Yah. Did it even de-age Ray just like the other rebirths did? Yep.
    How?

    It was so bad, Hadji.

    So, so bad.

    Munch on
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    The Lovely BastardThe Lovely Bastard Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    people like some terrible things

    I ain't get it

    The Lovely Bastard on
    7656367.jpg
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    HadjiQuestHadjiQuest Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Munch wrote: »
    HadjiQuest wrote: »
    Also, I dug the Atom special as well. Was it just Atom: Rebirth? Yah. Was it even written in a Geoff Johnsian style, with Johnsian prose and tropes? Yah. Did it even de-age Ray just like the other rebirths did? Yep.
    How?

    It was so bad, Hadji.

    So, so bad.

    Childhood nostalgia.

    My parents never took me to the shops frequently enough to read singles, and most of the grocery/etc. stores near me got comics at irregular intervals.

    Instead, I would buy forgotten 70s and 80s issues out of boxes at the antique shops I was dragged to. So I love these sort of surreal, old-school stories where there are tons of supporting characters that have never been mentioned before and everything is suddenly different just to launch a new story. Even the final 'twist' made me smile.

    Lemire is definitely in super-homage mode here, to a ridiculous level. And I love it.

    HadjiQuest on
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    Unco-ordinatedUnco-ordinated NZRegistered User regular
    edited July 2010
    HadjiQuest wrote: »
    I'm sorry guys....

    I actually kind of liked Issue 5.

    I still read enough of it to keep up with events and no, it's still really, really bad. My guess is you've just got stockholm syndrome, Johns has been keeping your brain hostage for way too long. How else do you explain your dislike of Tomasi's GLC?

    Unco-ordinated on
    Steam ID - LiquidSolid170 | PSN ID - LiquidSolid
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    LucascraftLucascraft Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    I enjoyed Brightest Day #5 also. It did not have any of the horrible Firestorm crap, and I've been enjoying the Hawkman/Girl story. I also enjoyed the Aquaman bits, and I'm curious to see where they go with that final reveal about Mera.

    I've really grown to like Mera ever since she reappeared in the Blackest Night books. She's a fun character.

    Lucascraft on
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    wirehead26wirehead26 Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Has DC said how they'll collect the main Brightest Day issues? Amazon has the first hardcover at 30 retail which is a bit expensive but it might contain a ton of issues.

    wirehead26 on
    I'M NOT FINISHED WITH YOU!!!
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    HadjiQuestHadjiQuest Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    wirehead26 wrote: »
    Has DC said how they'll collect the main Brightest Day issues? Amazon has the first hardcover at 30 retail which is a bit expensive but it might contain a ton of issues.

    Nope!

    It's only 7 issues.

    You're looking at probably 4 hardcovers for Brightest Day, and possibly the same (plus tie-in books like Booster and Power Girl) for Generation Lost.

    HadjiQuest on
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    wirehead26wirehead26 Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    HadjiQuest wrote: »
    wirehead26 wrote: »
    Has DC said how they'll collect the main Brightest Day issues? Amazon has the first hardcover at 30 retail which is a bit expensive but it might contain a ton of issues.

    Nope!

    It's only 7 issues.

    You're looking at probably 4 hardcovers for Brightest Day, and possibly the same (plus tie-in books like Booster and Power Girl) for Generation Lost.

    I really hope Amazon is wrong about that price because 30 dollars for 7 issues is a huge ripoff.

    wirehead26 on
    I'M NOT FINISHED WITH YOU!!!
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    HadjiQuestHadjiQuest Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    wirehead26 wrote: »
    HadjiQuest wrote: »
    wirehead26 wrote: »
    Has DC said how they'll collect the main Brightest Day issues? Amazon has the first hardcover at 30 retail which is a bit expensive but it might contain a ton of issues.

    Nope!

    It's only 7 issues.

    You're looking at probably 4 hardcovers for Brightest Day, and possibly the same (plus tie-in books like Booster and Power Girl) for Generation Lost.

    I really hope Amazon is wrong about that price because 30 dollars for 7 issues is a huge ripoff.

    I may very well be wrong about that issue count, actually. I could've swore I heard it was 7 issues (maybe 8 including the 0 issue) within the last two weeks, but I can't remember where that info came from.

    HadjiQuest on
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    HadjiQuestHadjiQuest Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Blamo.

    Looks like 3, $30 hardcovers for brightest day, and then 3 $20 paperbacks that won't see release till 2012.

    In slightly better news, Generation Lost will be collected in 2 $40 hardcovers.

    HadjiQuest on
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    wirehead26wirehead26 Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    HadjiQuest wrote: »
    wirehead26 wrote: »
    HadjiQuest wrote: »
    wirehead26 wrote: »
    Has DC said how they'll collect the main Brightest Day issues? Amazon has the first hardcover at 30 retail which is a bit expensive but it might contain a ton of issues.

    Nope!

    It's only 7 issues.

    You're looking at probably 4 hardcovers for Brightest Day, and possibly the same (plus tie-in books like Booster and Power Girl) for Generation Lost.

    I really hope Amazon is wrong about that price because 30 dollars for 7 issues is a huge ripoff.

    I may very well be wrong about that issue count, actually. I could've swore I heard it was 7 issues (maybe 8 including the 0 issue) within the last two weeks, but I can't remember where that info came from.

    Brightest Day is, what, 26 or 27 issues total? They could put around 9 in each collection but 30 retail is still a bit steep. The Blackest Night Green Lantern hardcover contains 10 issues and it's only 25.

    Edit: 30 dollars for 8 issues? That's not exactly making me rush out to get them.

    wirehead26 on
    I'M NOT FINISHED WITH YOU!!!
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    RansRans Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    new regular penciller of GREEN LANTERN CORPS announced: Tyler Kirkham

    glcor_cv53.jpg

    cover.jpg

    also something called "Untold Tales of the Black Lanterns" which sounds like a shameless cash grab on Blackest Night's popularity

    utbln_cv1.jpg

    http://dcu.blog.dccomics.com/2010/07/16/tyler-kirkham-%E2%80%93-exclusive-to-dc-and-drawing-green-lantern-corps/

    Rans on
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    TexiKenTexiKen Dammit! That fish really got me!Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Oh son of a bitch Rans I did the same thing in the GL thread (should we just let Brightest Day be the new GL Thread?)

    TexiKen on
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    RansRans Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    yeah i figured GL thread was at 99 and could be retired and have just been treating this as the new GL thread

    Rans on
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    TexiKenTexiKen Dammit! That fish really got me!Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    But the old thread was the original thread and Alex Ross said it needs to come back and be the main thread.

    check, your move

    TexiKen on
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    RansRans Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    why you gotta cut me so deeply

    wasn't the reveal of the green lantern movie costume enough

    Rans on
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    TexiKenTexiKen Dammit! That fish really got me!Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    I need to see the trailer, because seeing Hammond in front of that machine gave me an Ang Lee Hulk vibe that I didn't like.

    TexiKen on
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    LucascraftLucascraft Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    If you want this to be the Green Lantern thread to replace the old one, perhaps you should edit the title to reflect that in some way. Like Green Lantern + Brightest Day. Or something.

    Lucascraft on
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    MunchMunch Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    HadjiQuest wrote: »
    Childhood nostalgia.

    My parents never took me to the shops frequently enough to read singles, and most of the grocery/etc. stores near me got comics at irregular intervals.

    Instead, I would buy forgotten 70s and 80s issues out of boxes at the antique shops I was dragged to. So I love these sort of surreal, old-school stories where there are tons of supporting characters that have never been mentioned before and everything is suddenly different just to launch a new story. Even the final 'twist' made me smile.

    Lemire is definitely in super-homage mode here, to a ridiculous level. And I love it.
    Really? I didn't come away with that feeling at all. If he's homaging anything, I feel it's crappy Identity Crisis-era comics. I read the old Sword of the Atom mini-series yesterday, which came out in 1983, and even though it had infidelity, creepy guys with porno 'staches, stereotypical Colombian cocaine manufacturers, and the Atom almost getting killed by rats, snakes, a crocodile, and ants, it still had more of a fun, adventurous tone than the Brightest Day one-shot.

    Here's a quick synopsis for those that didn't read it.
    The issue opens with Ray in his secret lab, which has been trashed. And it's not a cool, super-tiny secret lab like you'd expect the Atom to have. It's just a normal, boring lab. Also, it's revealed that Ray has total recall, his mind able to store vast amounts of information. Which I guess is kind of interesting, but feels like a generic smart guy ability.

    Then there's a flashback to the Ivy Town library, where a bunch of generic ski-mask wearing terrorists with guns have taken a hostage. I've said it before, but if you're going to only have one big action beat in your comic, don't use random goons. That's so boring. Anyhow, Ray predictably beats them up while explaining his powers and saying things like, "These guys were in my house now!" Then he rescues their hostage and realizes that the guy looks like him, when he was younger.

    Cut back to the demolished lab, where Ray's talking with his old buddy Professor Hyatt, who says he's the only one who knows Ray's secret identity. By the way? That's pretty much what the whole story's built on. Someone's uncovered Ray's secret identity, and is now targeting him.

    But Ray's identity's been public for like, years. Years, and years, and years. And it's been a major plot point in a couple stories. That's why he and Elongated Man's spouses were the first victims in Identity Crisis, because they each had public aliases. That's why Ryan Choi knew he was corresponding with the Atom. To overlook such an important aspect of the character, and build a story around it, grates on me in a big way.

    Anyhow, cue another flashback where we find out about Ray's childhood. Here's the quick version: His mom died, his brother was a jock, his dad was a jock, Ray was a dork, and Ray's uncle was a dork. This is handled exactly as subtlety as you might imagine, with Ray's dad singling out Ray's brother Dan as his favorite son, and Ray's uncle David visiting and consoling Ray.

    Anyhow, flash to the future and Ray's brother, a firefighter like his father, dies in a collapsing house. His dad sinks into a deep depression.

    A few years later, Ray and Professor Hyatt discover the dwarf star that gives Ray his powers, and Ray uses it to start shrinking stuff. Oh yeah, Ray's also apparently now like Hank Pym, and carries around various knick knacks at a shrunken size, popping them out of his belt as needed. But I'm pretty sure his powers have never worked on stuff other than him. That's why Ryan Choi's Bang-Stick didn't shrink when he did, and he instead rode around on it. Whatever, not a huge deal.

    Anyhow, Ryan uses the dwarf star to make a prototype costume, saves a firefighter from a collapsing cave (see that subtlety?) and makes a name for himself as the Atom. Cut back to present day, and Ray finds a tiny scrap of paper, smaller than his fingernail, among the ruins of his lab, and it bears the same mark as a ring that his uncle David always wore. Two things here: One, if you're going to have Ray find something all super-tiny that was clearly meant as a message for him, why not have him shrink down and find it? Wouldn't that make more sense? Instead he just finds it among a huge pile of debris. And two, the next page after he finds the scrap of paper shows his Uncle David's ring, complete with the symbol. Flip back a few pages to where David first shows up, in the same scene depicted on this page, and you'll see he's very clearly not wearing a ring. Continuity!

    Anyway, Ray decides he needs to urgently see his dad. But he can't go through his phone because, as he explains to Professor Hyatt, he doesn't know he's the Atom, and shock could give him a heart attack. Fucking really?

    Your firefighter, tough-as-nails dad would just have a cartoonish heart attack immediately upon seeing you, even though he lives in a universe where this shit's as common as the cold? Even though you're supposed to have a public identity? Wait a second Ray, why not just phone him and come out of the phone the size of a gnat, run outside his apartment, grow to normal size, and knock on the door? Why not phone a store around the corner from where he lives, and pop out there? No? Okay, better just drive there. Hope nothing happens!

    Then Ray jumps through the keyhole into his Dad's apartment when he doesn't answer the door! That whole heart attack thing isn't such a big deal now, huh Ray? What if he was just taking a shit? Maybe that's what's -- oops, nope, he's dead!

    Dun dun dun!

    Good thing you decided to take your time Atom!

    Now, aside from the cringe-inducing expository dialogue, the cliche family melodrama, and the sheer predictability of the whole thing, I think my biggest problem is the way the book just steps all over continuity. And not in minor ways. It's big, big the-story-could-not-happen-if-we-didn't-ignore-this-shit ways.

    Ray's brother? Never mentioned before, and invented solely for this story, to drive some crappy conflict. Ray's dad, in present, post-CoIE continuity? His name's David, and he died from cancer when Ray was a teenager. Ray's Mom, who apparently died when he was a baby? She died years after his dad. Ray's Uncle David? never mentioned before, but it's blisteringly obvious that Lemire's going to reveal he was Ray's real father, which is why Ray's dad was such a dick to him. Ray's secret identity, which has become uncovered and now endangers all he holds dear? Been public for years.

    The Atom's not even in my top ten favorite characters, and I still hated this story. If you can't tell a compelling, interesting story without running roughshod over a character's history, you probably don't need to be writing superhero comics.

    Munch on
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    TexiKenTexiKen Dammit! That fish really got me!Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    To be fair, the only other thing I can think of coming from Colombia that isn't cocaine is coffee.

    That does sound bad, at least from the secret identity standpoint. It was a big part of when he was on the JLA in the past volume, he had to tell his students some days he wouldn't be in because he was saving the world.

    This is the kind of shit editors should be catching, it's not that hard.

    TexiKen on
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    RansRans Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    I'm going to guess that it is not that the editor's are missing this stuff, it's that the editor and writer come up with this idea, one of them points out the continuity error it creates, and they both just shrug and figure no one will care, that they are ignoring continuity for the sake of the story.

    Which sometimes is okay if you have a good story. If you insist on writing bad comics, at least respect continuity and you may not get hated on too much.

    Rans on
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    RansRans Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    http://www.newsarama.com/comics/Tyler-kirkham-dc-interview-100716.html

    Here's an interview with Tyler Kirkham where he expresses his enthusiasm for DC and the Corps, seems like a down to earth kind of guy. I'm also happy to see that GLC #53 is a Kyle and Soranik centric issue.

    Rans on
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    MunchMunch Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Rans wrote: »
    I'm going to guess that it is not that the editor's are missing this stuff, it's that the editor and writer come up with this idea, one of them points out the continuity error it creates, and they both just shrug and figure no one will care, that they are ignoring continuity for the sake of the story.

    Which sometimes is okay if you have a good story. If you insist on writing bad comics, at least respect continuity and you may not get hated on too much.
    Yeah, I should point out that the whole family stuff wouldn't grate on me if the story was good. It's a minor enough thing that it could be glossed over.

    But the secret identity issue is, in my mind, a pretty big deal. It's okay to ignore some aspects of a character if you have a good story to tell, but I think some parts of continuity are more important than other parts. Just as a for-instance, Countdown to Infinite Crisis gave Ted Kord a never-before-seen brother. Not a huge deal, though I think that the pressure of being his father's only child, and the childhood alienation that came with it, helped define that character's personality.

    But if someone decided to write that Blue Beetle had an excellent relationship with his father, that would bug the shit out of me, simply because I think his relationship with his asshole dad, which led to him taking a surrogate father in Dan Garret, is integral to the character's development and personality.

    But really, I've long since reconciled with the fact that I care about B-list character minutiae more than anyone actually working for Marvel or DC.

    Munch on
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    TexiKenTexiKen Dammit! That fish really got me!Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Looks like DC is doing another one of those poster images where you get some foreshadowing of what's to come in the coming months, like with Countdown and Superman crying and the villains one:

    15711.jpg

    TexiKen on
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    RansRans Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    my interpretation
    presumably this all has to do with the middle to end of Brightest Day, given when the con is happening.

    Ronnie and Jason joining forces to bury Black Lantern Firestorm / their past.

    Guy, Atrocitus, and Ganthet working together to recover a coffin. Working together to raise the dead? Bring some one or something back? This likely goes with the subplot running through all three GL titles.

    Deadman deciding to force Life on Death, despite the white battery's wishes?

    J'onn fighting the White symbol tree in Green Arrow's forest is probably a reference to J'onn's upcoming appearance in the GA title.

    Mera obviously feeling guilty over having to kill Aquaman.

    Not sure about Hawk/Dove/Jade.

    Rans on
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    TairuTairu Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Just noticed Black Manta's eyes staring at Aqualad from within the shadows

    Tairu on
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    HadjiQuestHadjiQuest Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Munch wrote: »
    HadjiQuest wrote: »
    Childhood nostalgia.

    My parents never took me to the shops frequently enough to read singles, and most of the grocery/etc. stores near me got comics at irregular intervals.

    Instead, I would buy forgotten 70s and 80s issues out of boxes at the antique shops I was dragged to. So I love these sort of surreal, old-school stories where there are tons of supporting characters that have never been mentioned before and everything is suddenly different just to launch a new story. Even the final 'twist' made me smile.

    Lemire is definitely in super-homage mode here, to a ridiculous level. And I love it.
    Really? I didn't come away with that feeling at all. If he's homaging anything, I feel it's crappy Identity Crisis-era comics. I read the old Sword of the Atom mini-series yesterday, which came out in 1983, and even though it had infidelity, creepy guys with porno 'staches, stereotypical Colombian cocaine manufacturers, and the Atom almost getting killed by rats, snakes, a crocodile, and ants, it still had more of a fun, adventurous tone than the Brightest Day one-shot.

    Here's a quick synopsis for those that didn't read it.
    The issue opens with Ray in his secret lab, which has been trashed. And it's not a cool, super-tiny secret lab like you'd expect the Atom to have. It's just a normal, boring lab. Also, it's revealed that Ray has total recall, his mind able to store vast amounts of information. Which I guess is kind of interesting, but feels like a generic smart guy ability.

    Then there's a flashback to the Ivy Town library, where a bunch of generic ski-mask wearing terrorists with guns have taken a hostage. I've said it before, but if you're going to only have one big action beat in your comic, don't use random goons. That's so boring. Anyhow, Ray predictably beats them up while explaining his powers and saying things like, "These guys were in my house now!" Then he rescues their hostage and realizes that the guy looks like him, when he was younger.

    Cut back to the demolished lab, where Ray's talking with his old buddy Professor Hyatt, who says he's the only one who knows Ray's secret identity. By the way? That's pretty much what the whole story's built on. Someone's uncovered Ray's secret identity, and is now targeting him.

    But Ray's identity's been public for like, years. Years, and years, and years. And it's been a major plot point in a couple stories. That's why he and Elongated Man's spouses were the first victims in Identity Crisis, because they each had public aliases. That's why Ryan Choi knew he was corresponding with the Atom. To overlook such an important aspect of the character, and build a story around it, grates on me in a big way.

    Anyhow, cue another flashback where we find out about Ray's childhood. Here's the quick version: His mom died, his brother was a jock, his dad was a jock, Ray was a dork, and Ray's uncle was a dork. This is handled exactly as subtlety as you might imagine, with Ray's dad singling out Ray's brother Dan as his favorite son, and Ray's uncle David visiting and consoling Ray.

    Anyhow, flash to the future and Ray's brother, a firefighter like his father, dies in a collapsing house. His dad sinks into a deep depression.

    A few years later, Ray and Professor Hyatt discover the dwarf star that gives Ray his powers, and Ray uses it to start shrinking stuff. Oh yeah, Ray's also apparently now like Hank Pym, and carries around various knick knacks at a shrunken size, popping them out of his belt as needed. But I'm pretty sure his powers have never worked on stuff other than him. That's why Ryan Choi's Bang-Stick didn't shrink when he did, and he instead rode around on it. Whatever, not a huge deal.

    Anyhow, Ryan uses the dwarf star to make a prototype costume, saves a firefighter from a collapsing cave (see that subtlety?) and makes a name for himself as the Atom. Cut back to present day, and Ray finds a tiny scrap of paper, smaller than his fingernail, among the ruins of his lab, and it bears the same mark as a ring that his uncle David always wore. Two things here: One, if you're going to have Ray find something all super-tiny that was clearly meant as a message for him, why not have him shrink down and find it? Wouldn't that make more sense? Instead he just finds it among a huge pile of debris. And two, the next page after he finds the scrap of paper shows his Uncle David's ring, complete with the symbol. Flip back a few pages to where David first shows up, in the same scene depicted on this page, and you'll see he's very clearly not wearing a ring. Continuity!

    Anyway, Ray decides he needs to urgently see his dad. But he can't go through his phone because, as he explains to Professor Hyatt, he doesn't know he's the Atom, and shock could give him a heart attack. Fucking really?

    Your firefighter, tough-as-nails dad would just have a cartoonish heart attack immediately upon seeing you, even though he lives in a universe where this shit's as common as the cold? Even though you're supposed to have a public identity? Wait a second Ray, why not just phone him and come out of the phone the size of a gnat, run outside his apartment, grow to normal size, and knock on the door? Why not phone a store around the corner from where he lives, and pop out there? No? Okay, better just drive there. Hope nothing happens!

    Then Ray jumps through the keyhole into his Dad's apartment when he doesn't answer the door! That whole heart attack thing isn't such a big deal now, huh Ray? What if he was just taking a shit? Maybe that's what's -- oops, nope, he's dead!

    Dun dun dun!

    Good thing you decided to take your time Atom!

    Now, aside from the cringe-inducing expository dialogue, the cliche family melodrama, and the sheer predictability of the whole thing, I think my biggest problem is the way the book just steps all over continuity. And not in minor ways. It's big, big the-story-could-not-happen-if-we-didn't-ignore-this-shit ways.

    Ray's brother? Never mentioned before, and invented solely for this story, to drive some crappy conflict. Ray's dad, in present, post-CoIE continuity? His name's David, and he died from cancer when Ray was a teenager. Ray's Mom, who apparently died when he was a baby? She died years after his dad. Ray's Uncle David? never mentioned before, but it's blisteringly obvious that Lemire's going to reveal he was Ray's real father, which is why Ray's dad was such a dick to him. Ray's secret identity, which has become uncovered and now endangers all he holds dear? Been public for years.

    The Atom's not even in my top ten favorite characters, and I still hated this story. If you can't tell a compelling, interesting story without running roughshod over a character's history, you probably don't need to be writing superhero comics.

    I read the first backup today and it was even worse.
    The Atom's dad had a stroke, and Ray just moped about it, then explained his dataline jumping for three pages. He popped up in the Calculator's office, and then also had a stroke, because it turns out that the calculator's office safeguard is a localized virus that causes strokes if you are exposed to it for more than a few minutes.

    So, yeah, that was pretty bad. The issue of Adventure Comics it was packed with wasn't so hot either; I may drop them.

    HadjiQuest on
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    durandal4532durandal4532 Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Man, Munch I am sure you get tired of hearing this but: your Atom story proposal is so much better.

    Become a published author so your submits will get taken seriously.

    durandal4532 on
    Take a moment to donate what you can to Critical Resistance and Black Lives Matter.
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    Robos A Go GoRobos A Go Go Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    I'm so jealous of Munch for his Atom proposal.

    Robos A Go Go on
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    WildcatWildcat Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Rans wrote: »
    my interpretation
    presumably this all has to do with the middle to end of Brightest Day, given when the con is happening.

    Ronnie and Jason joining forces to bury Black Lantern Firestorm / their past.

    Guy, Atrocitus, and Ganthet working together to recover a coffin. Working together to raise the dead? Bring some one or something back? This likely goes with the subplot running through all three GL titles.

    Deadman deciding to force Life on Death, despite the white battery's wishes?

    J'onn fighting the White symbol tree in Green Arrow's forest is probably a reference to J'onn's upcoming appearance in the GA title.

    Mera obviously feeling guilty over having to kill Aquaman.

    Not sure about Hawk/Dove/Jade.

    Also, is that
    Magog's staff weapon lying broken at the bottom-right of the picture?

    Wildcat on
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    TexiKenTexiKen Dammit! That fish really got me!Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    I think it is, Wildcat.

    Here is the official promo piece:

    1279628360.jpg

    TexiKen on
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    SolarSolar Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    They are really trying to channel the renaissance/religous art themes with thse Brightest Day spreads aren't they.

    Solar on
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    wirehead26wirehead26 Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Wow, another story where Anti-Monitor will show up and do absolutely nothing!

    wirehead26 on
    I'M NOT FINISHED WITH YOU!!!
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    TairuTairu Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Next to Jason is The Weaponer's new shield from the GLC previews

    Also: Aqualad has NO FEET. A bold move for the character.

    Tairu on
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    RansRans Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    it looks like the emotional spectrum colors are pretty well represented by the scenery and landscape also

    Rans on
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    Unco-ordinatedUnco-ordinated NZRegistered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Man, I was gonna do a Hal Jordan is Jesus joke before but I figured I may've been reading into it a bit too much. Now they've all but confirmed it.

    I wonder if Geoff Johns has a Hal Jordan shrine in his house. I bet he licks it at least once a day.

    Unco-ordinated on
    Steam ID - LiquidSolid170 | PSN ID - LiquidSolid
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    MunchMunch Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    Did Hawk and Dove buy a Jade RealDoll?

    Munch on
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    Linespider5Linespider5 ALL HAIL KING KILLMONGER Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    They really need to stop doing these.

    Linespider5 on
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    RansRans Registered User regular
    edited July 2010
    i like them. the countdown promos were better than the entire countdown series. why should they stop?

    Rans on
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