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Is there any reason to get AWD on a Honda CR-V, or is FWD fine?

dsplaisteddsplaisted Registered User regular
edited May 2010 in Help / Advice Forum
I'm thinking of buying a new Honda CR-V. I don't see much of a reason to get the all wheel drive version, as the FWD is over $1000 cheaper. I'm no car expert though, is there something I'm missing here? The AWD model seems a lot more common than the FWD.

EDIT: I live in Seattle.

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    Monolithic_DomeMonolithic_Dome Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    If you live in a place that gets a lot of snow/ice or you drive on a lot of dirt roads with some frequency, the AWD is probably worth it.

    If not, probably not.

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    tinwhiskerstinwhiskers Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Do you live where it snows?

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    DjeetDjeet Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    On slippery surfaces AWD can provide more bite to allow you to go better, but unless it also includes some form of traction control in most cases it's not really going to help you maintain control in a skid or stop any better. If you're stuck, it might also help get you out as you have 4 wheels that are trying to grip the ground/snow/mud. It can also allow you to accelerate or hold velocity in a turn better, but not sure how much spirited driving you're going to be doing in a CR-V.

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    tehmarkentehmarken BrooklynRegistered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Living in Seattle, I guess you get a lot of rain, and probably significant ice/snow in the winter? I'd go for the AWD.

    If it has the option to do 2wd/awd like some cars, run it in 2wd except for in bad road conditions to save gas.

    tehmarken on
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    Iceman.USAFIceman.USAF Major East CoastRegistered User regular
    edited May 2010
    tehmarken wrote: »
    Living in Seattle, I guess you get a lot of rain, and probably significant ice/snow in the winter? I'd go for the AWD.

    If it has the option to do 2wd/awd like some cars, run it in 2wd except for in bad road conditions to save gas.

    2wd/4wd you mean. AWD implies the car has no 2wd option. Minor detail (of which I don't know the technicalities enough to explain).

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    DjeetDjeet Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Modern AWD systems are going to be running 90/10 f/r axle bias for the sake of fuel economy most of the time. Power gets directed to the rear axle or appropriate wheel when the computer decides it's best (when slip is detected).

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    GafotoGafoto Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    My vote is go for FWD and buy a set of chains for snowy conditions.

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    mcdermottmcdermott Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    You have little need for AWD...it's a waste of money on the car, and on whatever hit to your mileage you wind up taking to have it.

    I lived in Bozeman, Montana with FWD, and got around just fine in town during the winter (didn't switch to a 4WD truck until I moved out into the sticks where our roads didn't get cleared as well). We get significant snow and ice seldom enough around here (I'm across the water) that honestly if you had to you could just call in sick on the four days a year when you'd otherwise want AWD.

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    EggyToastEggyToast Jersey CityRegistered User regular
    edited May 2010
    mcdermott wrote: »
    You have little need for AWD...it's a waste of money on the car, and on whatever hit to your mileage you wind up taking to have it.

    I lived in Bozeman, Montana with FWD, and got around just fine in town during the winter (didn't switch to a 4WD truck until I moved out into the sticks where our roads didn't get cleared as well). We get significant snow and ice seldom enough around here (I'm across the water) that honestly if you had to you could just call in sick on the four days a year when you'd otherwise want AWD.

    I'd lime this whole post. If you live somewhere where you get snow, it still depends -- does the snow get cleared? AWD on a vehicle is actually more important where you're actually driving on snow -- not driving on plowed roads. If your roads don't get plowed (like in Baltimore), then it's very useful. And if you live in rural areas where roads are typically plowed very late (if at all), then AWD is very useful.

    But if your roads are maintained during snow & ice storms, then you'd be fine. A good gauge is to see who else is on the road during what you perceive to be bad weather. If it's all SUVs and trucks, then it's worth it. If you see Corollas and Civics everywhere, well...

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    dsplaisteddsplaisted Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Seattle usually doesn't get much snow.

    Of course that means it's not prepared for when it does get a lot of snow, which happened in winter 08/09, the first winter I was here. But that doesn't seem like enough of a reason to go AWD to me.

    dsplaisted on
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    KistraKistra Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    How stable is your situation? Is there any chance you will be moving?

    I had a friend that came to college with a car and ended up selling it less than 6 months after she bought it because she grew up in texas and didn't consider the fact that she was going to college in a place where it snows regularly and they completely suck at plowing.

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    Seattle ThreadSeattle Thread Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    dsplaisted wrote: »
    Seattle usually doesn't get much snow.

    Of course that means it's not prepared for when it does get a lot of snow, which happened in winter 08/09, the first winter I was here. But that doesn't seem like enough of a reason to go AWD to me.
    It's not. That snowstorm was an anomaly, and very poorly managed by the city. We might get snow every two or three years for amonth at a time, and paying extra for something that you only might use every two or three years for a month at a time seems ridiculous.

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    Iceman.USAFIceman.USAF Major East CoastRegistered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Djeet wrote: »
    Modern AWD systems are going to be running 90/10 f/r axle bias for the sake of fuel economy most of the time. Power gets directed to the rear axle or appropriate wheel when the computer decides it's best (when slip is detected).

    Thanks! I believe its the same as in "older" Chrysler cars though, meaning you can't simply select "2WD only" right? It's always on, so you don't get a choice.

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    GungHoGungHo Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    There's no real reason for you to get the AWD model unless you plan on driving east up into the mountains. You're going to be FWD most of the time, even with the AWD. Honda's AWD in that vehicle works sort of like a traction control system. If the system detects a slip on one of the forward wheels, the back wheels wil get some power to compensate and help you regain control. It doesn't really even do the 90/10 that you may see on other cars. It's pretty much 100/0 until shit happens, IIRC.

    Otherwise, all it does is put 100lbs in the rear of the car. It doesn't have any low-range gearing or any way to give you a 50/50 lock. You're not going to be able to rally that thing or really take it off road into rocks anyway. It's made for roads.

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    DjeetDjeet Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Djeet wrote: »
    Modern AWD systems are going to be running 90/10 f/r axle bias for the sake of fuel economy most of the time. Power gets directed to the rear axle or appropriate wheel when the computer decides it's best (when slip is detected).

    Thanks! I believe its the same as in "older" Chrysler cars though, meaning you can't simply select "2WD only" right? It's always on, so you don't get a choice.

    I should say there are multiple implementations and they work differently to affect how the wheels turn, and not all work the way I described earlier. Often the only user intervention (if available) is to turn off traction or vehicle stability control or whatever it's called. I could see a 2WD override or diff lock override on a truck or trucky suv but haven't seen it myself. It's transparent to the user, the AWD system decides how/when to direct power.

    All my vehicles are AWD and TC and it's nice, and you do get used to the perception of additional grip in the rain or on gravel, but I could live without it. I'm not even sure how effective it is in snow/ice as we get it so infrequently and a 1/2" of ice will pretty much shut down the city.

    Djeet on
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    SatsumomoSatsumomo Rated PG! Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    CR-V's have a little logo in the back that says "Full-time AWD".

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