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The [GNU/Linux] thread, where 'Windows' is always spelled properly.

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Posts

  • ImpersonatorImpersonator Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    God damnit, I managed to screw up Grub. I was trying to dual boot with Windows XP and Jolicloud (Ubuntu), but after trying to reinstall Grub1 whenever I boot I just get a grub minimal bash.

    Am I missing something? I've tried reinstalling it countless times but no dice. :(

    edit: I'm trying this guide but it doesn't seem to do anything. https://help.ubuntu.com/community/DualBoot/Grub#Ubuntu%209.10%20&%20earlier

    Impersonator on
    Bioptic wrote: »
    Lemmings was pro-Communist propeganda. All are created equal, sorted into specific jobs and roles that they will hold for the rest of their lives by a higher authority, and must sacrifice continuously for the good of the group. Success is measured by meeting quotas and nothing else. Also, nuclear holocaust.
  • AizawaAizawa Registered User
    edited June 2010
    I dunno if someone already said this, 'cause I haven't read all the posts, but you can add Warsow and Nexuiz to the game section of the OP. Both are quakelikes, run on a (very, I gather) modified Quake 2 engine, are free and very probably available on repos. I know they are in Ubuntu, can't speak for any other distro. Oh, and the engine is open source, but I believe the art and such have some restrictions. Not too read up on that, though.

    Apparently some people are making (or even about to release, I just found the new website while posting this) a console version of Nexuiz with updated graphics and such. Quakelike on mah PS3/360? No thanks. Anyway, the PC version is obviously still on.

    EDIT: And apparently some people got angry about the new take on Nexuiz and started making Xonotic, which is a more community-driven effort to continue development of Nexuiz. I don't know how that will go, but if anybody is interested they have a wobsite: http://www.xonotic.org/
    Apparently people are more serious about it than the average sourcemod effort, but I hope it just doesn't die off.

    Aizawa on
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    Please, excuse any socially awkward actions taken by me. I have autism.
  • SeeksSeeks Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    That actually looks kinda cool.

    And it turns out that Warsow is also surprisingly not bad, except for the shitty saran-wrap look they decided to go with for every model. Or maybe it's just my graphics card, who knows.

    Kinda wish someone would make something that wasn't just an arena shooter though.

    Seeks on
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  • theSquidtheSquid Sydney, AustraliaRegistered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Seeks wrote: »
    That actually looks kinda cool.

    And it turns out that Warsow is also surprisingly not bad, except for the shitty saran-wrap look they decided to go with for every model. Or maybe it's just my graphics card, who knows.

    Kinda wish someone would make something that wasn't just an arena shooter though.

    Well there's the five million rumours about Valve making Steam for Linux, which will include all the Source engine games.

    And while Portal on Linux would be pure awesome, I'd really rather Blizzard port an RTS over, because there is fuck-all on the RTS front for Linux.

    theSquid on
  • FremFrem Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    theSquid wrote: »
    Seeks wrote: »
    That actually looks kinda cool.

    And it turns out that Warsow is also surprisingly not bad, except for the shitty saran-wrap look they decided to go with for every model. Or maybe it's just my graphics card, who knows.

    Kinda wish someone would make something that wasn't just an arena shooter though.

    Well there's the five million rumours about Valve making Steam for Linux, which will include all the Source engine games.

    And while Portal on Linux would be pure awesome, I'd really rather Blizzard port an RTS over, because there is fuck-all on the RTS front for Linux.

    Blizzard had an in-house Linux WoW client. I suspect they've got something similar for StarCraft II.

    WarCraft III runs quite well in Wine, if you run it with the opengl flag. StarCraft runs decently too, although there's some bug that moves the battle.net graphics above the visible part of the screen.

    I expect that StarCraft II will probably run decently on Wine on day 1. Although it would be nice if they'd actually give us native support.

    Frem on
  • TincheTinche No dog food for Victor tonight. Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Starcraft II beta works in Wine just fine, at least on my box.

    Tinche on
    We're marooned on a small island, in an endless sea,
    Confined to a tiny spit of sand, unable to escape,
    But tonight, it's heavy stuff.
  • DratatooDratatoo Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    I think there was a Linux version of the WoW Alpha or Beta for a very short time (I speak about the classic version). I think I read about it in one of the PA WoWChat threats as well...

    IMO a Linux version would be a nightmare to support on a consumer level with all the technological ignorant people which install Linux because its the cool thing to do at the time (which it is ;) ) or they found it on a CD of the local PC magazine:

    Examples:

    "What drivers are you using? Opensource1 (radeon) which blow, opensource 2 (radeonHD) which kindo blow, or closed source (fgrlx) which still blow but can at least do proper 3D?" "Make sure the kernel module is loaded at bootup, or else your 3D won't work (and maybe your X-Server)."

    "What version of the kernel you are using? Did you use native driver or did you use a ndiswrapper for your wifi card?" Ugh...
    Some of these answers (would) fill entire Wiki pages, not exactly as easy as telling them "Go there, download the latest driver, come back if you did so." - I know some distributions make things really easy, but I know from my experience that I was hunting through man pages, config files, Wikis, user forums for hours to solve some of my easier troubles with running things on Linux.

    Edit:

    I mean Blizzard could always chicken out and tell: "We offer it, but we don't support it." - But it would still generate a certain amount of requests I assume. and offering something with no support seems kinda dickish to me.

    Dratatoo on
  • FremFrem Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Dratatoo wrote: »
    I think there was a Linux version of the WoW Alpha or Beta for a very short time (I speak about the classic version). I think I read about it in one of the PA WoWChat threats as well...

    IMO a Linux version would be a nightmare to support on a consumer level with all the technological ignorant people which install Linux because its the cool thing to do at the time (which it is ;) ) or they found it on a CD of the local PC magazine:

    Examples:

    "What drivers are you using? Opensource1 (radeon) which blow, opensource 2 (radeonHD) which kindo blow, or closed source (fgrlx) which still blow but can at least do proper 3D?" "Make sure the kernel module is loaded at bootup, or else your 3D won't work (and maybe your X-Server)."

    "What version of the kernel you are using? Did you use native driver or did you use a ndiswrapper for your wifi card?" Ugh...
    Some of these answers (would) fill entire Wiki pages, not exactly as easy as telling them "Go there, download the latest driver, come back if you did so." - I know some distributions make things really easy, but I know from my experience that I was hunting through man pages, config files, Wikis, user forums for hours to solve some of my easier troubles with running things on Linux.

    Edit:

    I mean Blizzard could always chicken out and tell: "We offer it, but we don't support it." - But it would still generate a certain amount of requests I assume. and offering something with no support seems kinda dickish to me.

    Really, sound and 3D acceleration are the big ones. I'm pretty sure that if you can't even connect to the internet, any tech support person for an online product is going to laugh at you. I've had my share of headaces over the years, but about four years ago things really started shaping up. There have been regressions here and there every now and then, but it's not going to be long before many of these issues are a thing of the past.

    Offering something with no support only seems dickish until you consider that pretty much all non-business Linux use has thrived with very little to no commercial tech support.

    If Blizzard were going to do a Linux client of anything at this point, the best way to do it would be to have a very simple page with "Experimental" and "Unsupported" in big letters. Offer a small downloader on the page. When launched, the downloader would check to make sure the system actually has basic functionality like internet, drivers, decent hardware, etc. If the check fails, point the user to the most popular distro-specific support forum. (If the user isn't running a known Linux version, they probably know what they're doing anyway.) After the system has been OKed, it would inform the user and ask for a cdkey in order to start downloading the game. This would ensure that people could actually know if they could run the game or not before making a purchase and cut down on support calls.

    Nevertheless, I think we're not likely to see a Linux StarCraft II client in the near future. Maybe after the game has been out a few years. It's not like it's going anywhere. ;-) We've seen steady progress in the multimedia departments, and I expect the platform will become more attractive to game developers as improvements continue.

    Frem on
  • ImpersonatorImpersonator Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Linux is easy nowadays. Distributions like Ubuntu, Jolicloud and MeeGo are the future.

    Impersonator on
    Bioptic wrote: »
    Lemmings was pro-Communist propeganda. All are created equal, sorted into specific jobs and roles that they will hold for the rest of their lives by a higher authority, and must sacrifice continuously for the good of the group. Success is measured by meeting quotas and nothing else. Also, nuclear holocaust.
  • darkphoenix22darkphoenix22 Registered User
    edited June 2010
    Linux is easy nowadays. Distributions like Ubuntu, Jolicloud and MeeGo are the future.

    Heh. Yes, Linux is an order of magnitude easier to use then it was 10 years ago. Mostly because of half decent package managers.

    Installing KDE 3.0 manually on Mandrake 8.2 with just RPM was pure pain.

    darkphoenix22 on
  • krushkrush Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Linux is easy nowadays. Distributions like Ubuntu, Jolicloud and MeeGo are the future.

    Heh. Yes, Linux is an order of magnitude easier to use then it was 10 years ago. Mostly because of half decent package managers.

    Installing KDE 3.0 manually on Mandrake 8.2 with just RPM was pure pain.

    tell me about it...


    In fact, installing ANYTHING even remotely "new" on any older distro, at times even within minor revisions, is a royal pain in the ass.

    If you happen to like something about an older distro, you're usually stuck with using that distro, never upgrading anything for fear that one update could break your install. I once tried to update Mandrake 7.2's GTK from 1.2 to 2.0 so I could run the latest (at that time) Firefox. All manner of shit broke while installing all of these obscure libraries and crap.

    If there's one thing I can say I DON'T like about Linux, it's backwards compatibility with most distros sucks.

    krush on
  • darkphoenix22darkphoenix22 Registered User
    edited June 2010
    krush wrote: »
    If you happen to like something about an older distro, you're usually stuck with using that distro, never upgrading anything for fear that one update could break your install. I once tried to update Mandrake 7.2's GTK from 1.2 to 2.0 so I could run the latest (at that time) Firefox. All manner of shit broke while installing all of these obscure libraries and crap.

    Heh. I still remember having to manually install the nightly build of Firebird (one of Firefox's old names) each day in order to get GTK 2.0 support. The stable build used GTK+ 1.2 which looked horrible because there was no anti-aliasing.

    To be honest though, Firefox still doesn't respect my anti-aliasing and DPI settings on Linux. It's why I use Epiphany. :P

    darkphoenix22 on
  • krushkrush Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    krush wrote: »
    If you happen to like something about an older distro, you're usually stuck with using that distro, never upgrading anything for fear that one update could break your install. I once tried to update Mandrake 7.2's GTK from 1.2 to 2.0 so I could run the latest (at that time) Firefox. All manner of shit broke while installing all of these obscure libraries and crap.

    Heh. I still remember having to manually install the nightly build of Firebird (one of Firefox's old names) each day in order to get GTK 2.0 support. The stable build used GTK+ 1.2 which looked horrible because there was no anti-aliasing.

    To be honest though, Firefox still doesn't respect my anti-aliasing and DPI settings on Linux. It's why I use Epiphany. :P

    I use Opera, works great.

    And, anti aliasing is also something I've always hated in Linux. Made fonts too damned big. It wasn't like AA in Win2000 where fonts would stay the same size on screen, but got "fuzzy" around the edges. The first time I ran across this was using Fluxbox on an older Mandrake/Mandriva version. I managed to turn off AA and my fonts went back to their normal size (like BlackBox used to look)

    krush on
  • darkphoenix22darkphoenix22 Registered User
    edited June 2010
    You can adjust the level of anti-aliasing GTK+/X11 uses. Light anti-aliasing might be closer to what you want.

    darkphoenix22 on
  • krushkrush Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    You can adjust the level of anti-aliasing GTK+/X11 uses. Light anti-aliasing might be closer to what you want.

    honestly, I'd prefer none.

    krush on
  • darkphoenix22darkphoenix22 Registered User
    edited June 2010
    Ya, I'm one of those weirdos who turns up the antialiasing to the max on every OS.

    darkphoenix22 on
  • DratatooDratatoo Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    I was not shitting on the usability aspect of Linux - things got much better since the days when RPM was introduced and you were trapped in a world of circular dependencies.

    I agree that the launcher idea sounds pretty good: An app which checks for supported audio systems, checks for internet connection, checks for 3D acceleration and the features of the installed HW and the necessary system files (It would be more feasible to compile the needed libs into the application - WoW itself, in order to prevent certain problems). If something is weird, the installer points out that certain problems with sound/grafic/could occur. Linux has lots of ways to determine which HW is installed and which versions of system files are used, I believe. Plus most of the graphic drivers aren't that bad, feature wise (nowadays).

    If Blizzard would then create a Linux subforum so that users had a platform to solve certain issues - this would be ideal. (I mean if they would go the route "no support" then there wouldn't be a need for a "blue Linux specialist" to post hints and tricks (if somebody like this exist then an ingame penguin avatar would be hilarious) but at least one moderator is needed to keep things civil there :P.

    Dratatoo on
  • FremFrem Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Dratatoo wrote: »
    If Blizzard would then create a Linux subforum so that users had a platform to solve certain issues - this would be ideal. (I mean if they would go the route "no support" then there wouldn't be a need for a "blue Linux specialist" to post hints and tricks (if somebody like this exist then an ingame penguin avatar would be hilarious) but at least one moderator is needed to keep things civil there :P.

    I almost something suggested that... but then I remembered the last time I visited the Battle.net forums. *shudder*

    I suppose it could work if they could limit it to people who were actually using the Linux client or something.

    Frem on
  • krushkrush Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Dratatoo wrote: »
    I was not shitting on the usability aspect of Linux - things got much better since the days when RPM was introduced and you were trapped in a world of circular dependencies.

    I agree that the launcher idea sounds pretty good: An app which checks for supported audio systems, checks for internet connection, checks for 3D acceleration and the features of the installed HW and the necessary system files (It would be more feasible to compile the needed libs into the application - WoW itself, in order to prevent certain problems). If something is weird, the installer points out that certain problems with sound/grafic/could occur. Linux has lots of ways to determine which HW is installed and which versions of system files are used, I believe. Plus most of the graphic drivers aren't that bad, feature wise (nowadays).

    If Blizzard would then create a Linux subforum so that users had a platform to solve certain issues - this would be ideal. (I mean if they would go the route "no support" then there wouldn't be a need for a "blue Linux specialist" to post hints and tricks (if somebody like this exist then an ingame penguin avatar would be hilarious) but at least one moderator is needed to keep things civil there :P.


    I still twitch when I think of trying to update stuff on my old RH 6.1 install, getting stuck in dep-hell every time.

    krush on
  • SeeksSeeks Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Just thought I'd pop in and mention that Sweep audio editor is actually a pretty decent alternative to Audacity. It's not the best thing ever but it gets the job done.

    As for why you'd need it, well, of the last five distros I've been on (not including dp's, since I didn't test Audacity there), four have been such that Audacity's had this issue with graphics drivers where sometimes it fucks up the display, like so:
    aud-fuckedup.jpg

    The Audacity people (at least on the forum) say it's the graphics drivers fault, and I guess that might be correct, but I dunno. Other programs don't seem to have that problem.


    Edit: On a completely separate note, I'm going to try installing the proprietary ATI drivers. Wish me luck.

    Seeks on
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  • SeeksSeeks Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Awesome, so that makes this the tenth or so distro I've kinda fucked by installing ATI's proprietary drivers. At least I'm not getting black-screened, so maybe I'll be able to fix the damage and revert back to the old driver.

    That being said, between this and the card's physical shortcomings (overheating), I think I'm pretty much done buying shit from ATI.

    Edit: Wow, that worked great. If only everything they made was half as efficient as their uninstaller, we'd be in business.

    Seeks on
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  • BarrakkethBarrakketh Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Seeks wrote: »
    Awesome, so that makes this the tenth or so distro I've kinda fucked by installing ATI's proprietary drivers. At least I'm not getting black-screened, so maybe I'll be able to fix the damage and revert back to the old driver.

    That being said, between this and the card's physical shortcomings (overheating), I think I'm pretty much done buying shit from ATI.

    Edit: Wow, that worked great. If only everything they made was half as efficient as their uninstaller, we'd be in business.

    ATI's drivers were easy to install and uninstall on Ubuntu.

    As far as cooling goes, the cooling solution varies between manufacturer and card. There are good ones and shitty ones, plus Nvidia's cards put out more heat than ATI's do so they aren't some magic solution to that problem, either.

    Barrakketh on
    Rollers are red, chargers are blue....omae wa mou shindeiru
  • darkphoenix22darkphoenix22 Registered User
    edited June 2010
    Barrakketh wrote: »

    ATI's drivers were easy to install and uninstall on Ubuntu.

    As far as cooling goes, the cooling solution varies between manufacturer and card. There are good ones and shitty ones, plus Nvidia's cards put out more heat than ATI's do so they aren't some magic solution to that problem, either.

    That's only if you use Jockey to install them. Also, the versions included with Ubuntu are always out of date (though that's more of a Ubuntu problem).

    I wish ATi would just make a PPA for their binary drivers like Nvidia so at least Ubuntu users won't have to screw around with their installer to use the latest versions.

    The open source Radeon drivers are a good alternative and even support things like XV video output and have decent 2D acceleration. Unfortunately, they don't support GPU throttling yet.

    darkphoenix22 on
  • BarrakkethBarrakketh Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Barrakketh wrote: »

    ATI's drivers were easy to install and uninstall on Ubuntu.

    As far as cooling goes, the cooling solution varies between manufacturer and card. There are good ones and shitty ones, plus Nvidia's cards put out more heat than ATI's do so they aren't some magic solution to that problem, either.

    That's only if you use Jockey to install them.

    False. I've never used any utility to help install the drivers. Just install them from the terminal. The --buildandinstallpkg switch (and the other options like it) accepts a string argument like Ubuntu/karmic, which will do exactly what it says it does. The GUI installer may list them by now, I've just always done it through the terminal.
    The open source Radeon drivers are a good alternative and even support things like XV video output and have decent 2D acceleration. Unfortunately, they don't support GPU throttling yet.

    They also don't properly support power management on my adapter, so I get two problems with them; either the monitor will try to go to standby after 5 five minutes of no activity, or it will never go into standby automatically. Trying to change the standby/suspend time with xset does nothing, though I can make it suspend with "xset dpms force suspend" when it won't do it itself.

    Barrakketh on
    Rollers are red, chargers are blue....omae wa mou shindeiru
  • darkphoenix22darkphoenix22 Registered User
    edited June 2010
    Barrakketh wrote: »
    False. I've never used any utility to help install the drivers. Just install them from the terminal. The --buildandinstallpkg switch (and the other options like it) accepts a string argument like Ubuntu/karmic, which will do exactly what it says it does. The GUI installer may list them by now, I've just always done it through the terminal.

    You and I have a very different definition of easy. ;)

    darkphoenix22 on
  • BarrakkethBarrakketh Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Barrakketh wrote: »
    False. I've never used any utility to help install the drivers. Just install them from the terminal. The --buildandinstallpkg switch (and the other options like it) accepts a string argument like Ubuntu/karmic, which will do exactly what it says it does. The GUI installer may list them by now, I've just always done it through the terminal.

    You and I have a very different definition of easy. ;)

    One line in the terminal is what I consider easy :P

    Barrakketh on
    Rollers are red, chargers are blue....omae wa mou shindeiru
  • darkphoenix22darkphoenix22 Registered User
    edited June 2010
    Barrakketh wrote: »
    One line in the terminal is what I consider easy :P

    Having it show up automatically in Jockey (the latest drivers too) and clicking enable is what I consider easy.

    darkphoenix22 on
  • Apothe0sisApothe0sis Have you ever questioned the nature of your reality? Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    I spent some time last night customising .screenrc to get something pretty and useful happening for my screen sessions.

    I'm still not sure about which colour to use for my active window, but here's what I have so far.
    backtick 1 0 0 ifstat
    
    hardstatus on
    
    caption always
    caption string "&#37;{= Kc}%H%{w}|%{-}Net: %1`%=%{w}|%{-}Load: %l%<"
    
    hardstatus alwayslastline  "%?%{Kc}%-Lw%?%{cK}%n*%f %t%?(%u)%?%{Kc}%+Lw%? %=%{w}
    %>|%{-}%D    %m/%d %C%a%<"
    
    bind f eval "caption splitonly"
    bind F eval "caption always"    "hardstatus alwayslastline"
    

    There are a few things I should change, I'd like a semi-intelligent handling of window titles, which I believe screen can handle. And I am also thinking I shall set up a script to use the blank space in between the network usage and cpu load to report on the current status of the daemons that I care about (i.e. are they running) MHdN (that sort of thing, where the letters change case based on whether the daemon is active or not). I also haven't tried this in split screen, and so it probably doesn't have proper focus controls yet, but I have some plans for that.

    Now, can anyone teach me to read the CPU load in a meaningful way? I believe it's cpu, ram, swap (or is it nice, unnice, system?)

    Apothe0sis on
  • TincheTinche No dog food for Victor tonight. Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    If you mean the three load numbers as produced by top, read this. Basically if the load number is below your number of cores, your system is underutilized. As for setting up fancy screen sessions, I just use byobu on my Ubuntu box. I find it nice.

    Tinche on
    We're marooned on a small island, in an endless sea,
    Confined to a tiny spit of sand, unable to escape,
    But tonight, it's heavy stuff.
  • darkphoenix22darkphoenix22 Registered User
    edited June 2010
    A nice overview I found of a bunch of useful command-line utilities for Linux. Great for SSHing.

    http://kmandla.wordpress.com/software/

    darkphoenix22 on
  • TincheTinche No dog food for Victor tonight. Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Out of all the listed programs, I've used Pine (upon which Alpine is based), Links (listed as ELinks), iftop, screen (not screen-vs) and vim (of course). Will look at htop. Some of those seem of dubious utility, though :P Too bad they didn't mention Finch, it's the terminal version of Pidgin (they even share account info). Since I learned what Unix command line I know by playing MUDs from the Uni mainframe 15 years ago, I'd have mentioned tintin++ too :lol:

    Tinche on
    We're marooned on a small island, in an endless sea,
    Confined to a tiny spit of sand, unable to escape,
    But tonight, it's heavy stuff.
  • SeeksSeeks Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    So, are there any good DV capturing alternatives to Kino out there?

    Kino would be fantastic, if not for the fact that it segfaults like a motherfucker. Literally everything I do is followed by ctrl+s because there's a constant 50/50 chance it'll crash. Very annoying.

    Seeks on
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  • FremFrem Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    So, this is kinda big news for Ubuntu users. It resolves an issue that darkphoenix22 mentioned not pages ago.

    Ubuntu 10.10 will potentially have a mechanism to allow users to update applications to new versions. No longer will users have to choice between using outdated software and tracking down 3rd parties repositories.

    It seems like a big undertaking, because they'll still be doing testing and such for new releases of core applications. They also won't be touching any system libraries to prevent breakage or regressions. But definitely lots of props for the change.

    Frem on
  • darkphoenix22darkphoenix22 Registered User
    edited June 2010
    Seeks wrote: »
    So, are there any good DV capturing alternatives to Kino out there?

    Kino would be fantastic, if not for the fact that it segfaults like a motherfucker. Literally everything I do is followed by ctrl+s because there's a constant 50/50 chance it'll crash. Very annoying.

    OpenShot is nice.

    http://www.openshotvideo.com/

    darkphoenix22 on
  • darkphoenix22darkphoenix22 Registered User
    edited June 2010
    Frem wrote: »
    So, this is kinda big news for Ubuntu users. It resolves an issue that darkphoenix22 mentioned not pages ago.

    Ubuntu 10.10 will potentially have a mechanism to allow users to update applications to new versions. No longer will users have to choice between using outdated software and tracking down 3rd parties repositories.

    It seems like a big undertaking, because they'll still be doing testing and such for new releases of core applications. They also won't be touching any system libraries to prevent breakage or regressions. But definitely lots of props for the change.

    I'm happy someone else is implementing my ideas. :P

    More info:

    https://lists.ubuntu.com/archives/ubuntu-devel-discuss/2010-June/011671.html
    https://blueprints.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+spec/desktop-maverick-opportunistic-apps-stable-release

    darkphoenix22 on
  • SeeksSeeks Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Seeks wrote: »
    So, are there any good DV capturing alternatives to Kino out there?

    Kino would be fantastic, if not for the fact that it segfaults like a motherfucker. Literally everything I do is followed by ctrl+s because there's a constant 50/50 chance it'll crash. Very annoying.

    OpenShot is nice.

    http://www.openshotvideo.com/

    Openshot won't capture DV (at least not in any way that's apparent to me), but it is a decent editor.

    Seeks on
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  • darkphoenix22darkphoenix22 Registered User
    edited June 2010
    More info on the testing and approval for the new application approval system:

    https://wiki.ubuntu.com/PostReleaseApps/Process

    It doesn't cover application updates, only *new* applications. It seems also a bit process and red-tape heavy ATM, but that stuff can be moderated later on.

    It's a step forward to say the least, but I'm disappointed that it doesn't cover application updates.


    I think leaving maintenance of the end-user applications to the developers will free up a ton of resources so the Ubuntu developers can focus on making the core OS stable. In addition, it also removes the major reason for having a new version of Ubuntu every 6 months. This will give the developers of Ubuntu more time to test the OS.

    Basically, I feel that having the applications updated and distributed separately from the core OS releases will result in a more stable distribution.


    I wrote a response to the mailing post I linked above, detailing my criticisms of the proposed application review process.

    https://lists.ubuntu.com/archives/ubuntu-devel-discuss/2010-June/011714.html

    darkphoenix22 on
  • KingthlayerKingthlayer Registered User
    edited June 2010
    So, a friend of mine told me, when I asked him a good way to learn more about Linux, that I should install Slackware from the first CD only on virtualbox and go from there.

    The problem is, I seem to have no ifconfig. Locate ifconfig turns up nothing, even if I run it as root. Is that something that's on another CD? Does anyone have any insight here?

    Kingthlayer on
    "And who are you," the proud lord said,
    "that I must bow so low?
    Only a cat of a different coat,
    that's all the truth I know.
    In a coat of gold or a coat of red
    a lion still has claws;
    And mine are long and sharp, my lord
    as long and sharp as yours."
    And so he spoke, and so he spoke,
    that lord of Castamere,
    but now the rains weep o'er his hall,
    with no one there to hear.
    Yes now the rains weep o'er his hall
    and not a soul to hear.
  • SeeksSeeks Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Honestly, I always download the giant "everything included" DVD... haven't dealt with the CDs in a long time. If I remember correctly, there are categories you can check/uncheck during the install process such as "network" or "desktop environments", etc. My guess is you just ended up not installing it by accident, and it may in fact be on the other CDs.

    I think the slackware website might list what's on each disc, software-wise. If not, try the FTPs and see if there's a contents text file or something.


    Where are you coming from, linux-wise? Fresh to it or semi-experienced?

    Seeks on
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  • EndEnd Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    How are you running it by root? I'd try running it as /sbin/ifconfig, although "running as root" would normally have /sbin/ included...

    That's strange if it really isn't installed. Slackware wouldn't really be my first choice for a someone new to Linux to try though.

    End on
    I wish that someway, somehow, that I could save every one of us
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