The [GNU/Linux] thread, where 'Windows' is always spelled properly.

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  • Shorn Scrotum ManShorn Scrotum Man Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    That's fine. I think his point is that you shouldn't talk shit about distros you haven't used in a long time. It makes you say dumb things.

    Shorn Scrotum Man on
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  • darkphoenix22darkphoenix22 Registered User
    edited June 2010
    That's fine. I think his point is that you shouldn't talk shit about distros you haven't used in a long time. It makes you say dumb things.

    I was trying to be as objective as possible. The focus of Fedora and OpenSUSE is to provide testing for their enterprise distros. Ask any Red Hat or Novell dev and they'll freely admit it.

    Ubuntu is the closest thing to a fully desktop-oriented distro we have. And they have done great things, like Software Center, Jockey, and Update Manager. I just feel they are going in the wrong direction in terms of stability and need to focus more on making things work as opposed to making things pretty.

    Mostly because if Ubuntu works, it's less work for me. ;P

    darkphoenix22 on
  • FremFrem Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Ubuntu is the closest thing to a fully desktop-oriented distro we have. ... I just feel they are going in the wrong direction in terms of stability and need to focus more on making things work as opposed to making things pretty.

    So, basically, you think Ubuntu should be Debian + proprietary drivers + all the custom UI stuff Ubuntu does?

    Frem on
  • Shorn Scrotum ManShorn Scrotum Man Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Another post more about his distro and nothing about what he was claiming.

    ~yawn~

    Shorn Scrotum Man on
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  • darkphoenix22darkphoenix22 Registered User
    edited June 2010
    Frem wrote: »
    Ubuntu is the closest thing to a fully desktop-oriented distro we have. ... I just feel they are going in the wrong direction in terms of stability and need to focus more on making things work as opposed to making things pretty.

    So, basically, you think Ubuntu should be Debian + proprietary drivers + all the custom UI stuff Ubuntu does?

    Essentially, yes. Right on. :P

    darkphoenix22 on
  • darkphoenix22darkphoenix22 Registered User
    edited June 2010
    Another post more about his distro and nothing about what he was claiming.

    ~yawn~

    If you want examples of what I'm claiming, look back one page about the issues my friend had with Ubuntu Netbook Remix, look futher up and you'll see the problems I had with native games. Look a few more pages back and you'll see the problem zeeny had with Lucid blank screening, caused by Nouveau.

    There are lots of examples. Just because you haven't come up against these issues doesn't mean they don't exist. Get out of your bubble. :P

    darkphoenix22 on
  • VistiVisti Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Man, we had the potential to go an entire page without an avatar there.

    Visti on
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  • Shorn Scrotum ManShorn Scrotum Man Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Get out of your bubble. :P

    This, right here?

    Freaking golden coming from you.

    Shorn Scrotum Man on
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  • darkphoenix22darkphoenix22 Registered User
    edited June 2010
    I have a Mac. I used Mac OS X for 1.5 years then switched to Windows for another 1.5 years.

    I used RPM before there was fancy package mangers. I still have awlful memories of installing KDE 3.0 on Mandrake 8.2 and trying to compile Gnome 2.0 (didn't work out).

    I then used SuSE and experenced the inflexibility of Yast. I was forced to use apt-rpm so I could have a decent package manager. This was before Ubuntu even existed back in the Debian Woody days.

    I refuse to go back to RPM. Period.

    darkphoenix22 on
  • FremFrem Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    I used RPM before there was fancy package mangers. I still have awlful memories of installing KDE 3.0 on Mandrake 6.2 and trying to compile Gnome 2.0 (didn't work out).

    I then used SuSE and experenced the inflexibility of Yast. I was forced to use apt-rpm so I could have a decent package manager. This was before Ubuntu even existed back in the Debian Woody days.

    I refuse to go back to RPM. Period.

    That was what, close to ten years ago? Eons.

    Frem on
  • darkphoenix22darkphoenix22 Registered User
    edited June 2010
    Frem wrote: »
    That was what, close to ten years ago? Eons.

    I'm quite happy with apt. ;)

    darkphoenix22 on
  • ImpersonatorImpersonator Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Visti wrote: »
    Man, we had the potential to go an entire page without an avatar there.

    I don't have avatars turned on so it's always like that to me. :P I'm thinking of actually turning off signatures as well, but then I'd lose good-looking dude with great hair holding a keyboard. :(

    Impersonator on
    Bioptic wrote: »
    Lemmings was pro-Communist propeganda. All are created equal, sorted into specific jobs and roles that they will hold for the rest of their lives by a higher authority, and must sacrifice continuously for the good of the group. Success is measured by meeting quotas and nothing else. Also, nuclear holocaust.
  • VistiVisti Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Visti wrote: »
    Man, we had the potential to go an entire page without an avatar there.

    I don't have avatars turned on so it's always like that to me. :P I'm thinking of actually turning off signatures as well, but then I'd lose good-looking dude with great hair holding a keyboard. :(

    That would be an unaccountable loss, for sure.

    Visti on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • DratatooDratatoo Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Whoa, I didn't try to initiate a "this distribution sucks" discussion. I was just disappointed that using the nvidia drivers resulted in me digging through config files figuring out how to get things working. Ubuntu is one of the first distros which enabled compiz by default and now I am left in the rain if I want to enable the pretty effects and run the thing a reasonable resolution. Changing the resolution shouldn't be more difficult than plugging in and automonting an USB drive, something which most Linux distros are able to do for years now. At least I solved the issue.

    In order to avoid that the discussion becomes one sided, here are some tibits which I like about Ubuntu:

    Linux flexibilty: I love UIDs for mounting partitions. In earlier linux distros you could really mess up your installation by just adding an additional drive. Especially if you had one of those Iomega Zip drives which were considered non-removal if not properly configured. Even inserted zip media during boot could mess up the device numbering. I spend many hours fixing these. It was like living in a street where parked cars would get house numbers over night - rearanging included. Because of this and the "monolith"-like, early kernel (compile for your HW configuration) linux felt inflexible in lots of parts and tailored for this specific system.

    A few weeks ago, the mainboard of my backup server died. Bought a new one, put the Hw back in, set the booting device. Ubuntu continued to work, like nothing happened.

    Dratatoo on
  • darkphoenix22darkphoenix22 Registered User
    edited June 2010
    I agree that UUIDs and many of Ubuntu's features are great. Software Center, Jockey, Update Manager, and most of all, Ubiquity are Ubuntu contributions that have made the lives of many users much easier. But many of Ubuntu's strengths also come from Debian and this has been often forgotten.

    The developers of Ubuntu have to understand that even though they are the largest Linux distribution, they still have to contribute back to the community. I go around and see Debian, Red Hat, and Novell developers everywhere contributing to the core projects and drivers. I have seen VERY few Ubuntu developers. They seem to be on their own little island and have pretty much stopped talking to the general Linux community.

    Ubuntu has to understand that even though Ubuntu is the largest Linux distribution, it is not the entirety of Linux. And they have to do more than just backport code.

    darkphoenix22 on
  • ImpersonatorImpersonator Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Wow, apparently the issue I had with bad framerates was due to the x264 codec or something being shit. I'm running Jolicloud from an USB stick and I'm getting sweet performance out of a high quality quicktime file. :D

    <3 Jolicloud

    Impersonator on
    Bioptic wrote: »
    Lemmings was pro-Communist propeganda. All are created equal, sorted into specific jobs and roles that they will hold for the rest of their lives by a higher authority, and must sacrifice continuously for the good of the group. Success is measured by meeting quotas and nothing else. Also, nuclear holocaust.
  • SeeksSeeks Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Visti wrote: »
    Man, we had the potential to go an entire page without an avatar there.

    Haha, I was thinking the same thing. Silly argumentative geese need to stop getting jailed, jeez.

    Seeks on
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  • darkphoenix22darkphoenix22 Registered User
    edited June 2010
    Well you guys can be happy that I'm done. All the pent up anger is now gone. ;)

    darkphoenix22 on
  • SeidkonaSeidkona Had an upgrade Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    It's almost like someone proclaimed Emacs better then Vi or something.

    In other news: Fedora 13 runs quite well on my netbook. I swear that little machine is destined as distro of the week tester, extrodinare.

    Seidkona on
    Mostly just huntin' monsters.
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  • VistiVisti Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Entaru wrote: »
    It's almost like someone proclaimed Emacs better then Vi or something.

    Lets kung fu fight!


    .. really, I have emacs-envy.

    Also, I just got eminent running on Awesome and dynamic tagging is actually pretty cool. I'm not sure if there's a way you're supposed to keep track of what your tags are named other than remembering, but I don't have a lot, so that's alright.

    Visti on
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  • zeenyzeeny Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    I don't get it.
    Why would anybody proclaim the obvious? :P

    zeeny on
  • FremFrem Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    After a brief jaunt using Windows, I've decided that I like how the Windows cmd prompt inserts a newline before each C:\> prompt. It helps me distinguish between the long lists of errors gcc likes to spit at me.

    I wanted to replicate it. Instead of
    [email protected]:~/Dropbox/code/afternoonCMS$ ls
    gfm.py          Markdown-2.0.3 python  shoutdown (javascript)  test.txt
    Markdown_1.0.1  replace.py             template_page.html
    [email protected]:~/Dropbox/code/afternoonCMS$ ls
    gfm.py          Markdown-2.0.3 python  shoutdown (javascript)  test.txt
    Markdown_1.0.1  replace.py             template_page.html
    

    I want to see
    [email protected]:~/Dropbox/code/afternoonCMS$ ls
    gfm.py          Markdown-2.0.3 python  shoutdown (javascript)  test.txt
    Markdown_1.0.1  replace.py             template_page.html
    
    [email protected]:~/Dropbox/code/afternoonCMS$ ls
    gfm.py          Markdown-2.0.3 python  shoutdown (javascript)  test.txt
    Markdown_1.0.1  replace.py             template_page.html
    

    So I'm all like: echo $PS1
    And bash is all like: \[\e]0;\[email protected]\h: \w\a\]\[email protected]\h:\w$
    So I go into my .bashrc and put in PS1="\n\[\e]0;\[email protected]\h: \w\a\]\[email protected]\h:\w$ "

    Now all is fine and dandy. But when I open a new terminal, it always starts with a newline. This bugs me. Have I erred? Is there a way to remove the newline, but only when it's the first prompt in the terminal? Or am I going about this completely the wrong way?

    Frem on
  • VistiVisti Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Well, now your prompt has a newline in it and of course it puts the prompt as you start a terminal. I don't think there's any way to distinguish between a new terminal and just the regular prompt.

    I guess you could put a clear in the bottom of your .bashrc and then just put the regular prompt without the newline there kind of like I have a calendar when I open a terminal, but I'm not sure.

    Visti on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Apothe0sisApothe0sis Have you ever questioned the nature of your reality? Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    I'm keen on migrating my current machine from Debian to VMWare ESXi so I can do things like run additional machines and OSs as is my wont.

    Unfortunately, I have run into the following issue - I'm not sure if it's possible to do an in place upgrade and not lose all of my data.

    Does anyone know if I can give a VM access to a physical, EXT3 formatted drive? If so, then I am away. Otherwise, I have to faff about.

    EDIT: Argh, looks like I need to purchase myself another external drive.

    Rats.

    Apothe0sis on
  • DedianDedian Registered User
    edited June 2010
    As an aside, you have everything checked off as far as hardware compatibility and ESXi? It's not nearly as comprehensive as the linux kernel for device support. It's possible to add device support to an extent, and while not hard, is done in a roundabout way.

    Dedian on
  • darkphoenix22darkphoenix22 Registered User
    edited June 2010
    This is tangental to Linux, but I got a letter published in my paper back home suggesting that the government mandate that all "digital lock" (a.k.a DRM) be based on open source technology.

    Society should hold the key to the methods of access to our media.

    http://infinityos.net/node/47
    http://www.thepeterboroughexaminer.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=2616726

    darkphoenix22 on
  • FremFrem Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    This is tangental to Linux, but I got a letter published in my paper back home suggesting that the government mandate that all "digital lock" (a.k.a DRM) be based on open source technology.

    Society should hold the key to the methods of access to our media.

    http://infinityos.net/node/47
    http://www.thepeterboroughexaminer.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=2616726

    So, wait. It's just like DRM, except that the customer can potentially start distributing copies of the product at any time? I really see large companies jumping on that.

    Frem on
  • RSPRSP Registered User
    edited June 2010
    Frem wrote: »
    This is tangental to Linux, but I got a letter published in my paper back home suggesting that the government mandate that all "digital lock" (a.k.a DRM) be based on open source technology.

    Society should hold the key to the methods of access to our media.

    http://infinityos.net/node/47
    http://www.thepeterboroughexaminer.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=2616726

    So, wait. It's just like DRM, except that the customer can potentially start distributing copies of the product at any time? I really see large companies jumping on that.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kerckhoffs'_principle

    Regardless of one's agreement or disagreement with darkphoenix22's letter.

    RSP on
  • FremFrem Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    RSP wrote: »
    Frem wrote: »
    This is tangental to Linux, but I got a letter published in my paper back home suggesting that the government mandate that all "digital lock" (a.k.a DRM) be based on open source technology.

    Society should hold the key to the methods of access to our media.

    http://infinityos.net/node/47
    http://www.thepeterboroughexaminer.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=2616726

    So, wait. It's just like DRM, except that the customer can potentially start distributing copies of the product at any time? I really see large companies jumping on that.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kerckhoffs'_principle

    Regardless of one's agreement or disagreement with darkphoenix22's letter.

    Sure, but for the customer to use the encrypted product, they need to have a key. The key itself could be tied to an account or service like iTunes or Stream, but what's stopping the customer from unlocking the software/media with their key and just distributing it?

    It has all the flaws of DRM and it's even more trivial to crack.

    "Trying to make digital files uncopyable is like trying to make water not wet."
    -- Bruce Schneier

    Frem on
  • darkphoenix22darkphoenix22 Registered User
    edited June 2010
    Frem wrote: »
    "Trying to make digital files uncopyable is like trying to make water not wet."
    -- Bruce Schneier

    My goal isn't to discourage *reproduction*. It's to discourage *republication*, which is a MUCH easier task.

    I'm advocating strict fines for publishing a key or content that is known to have been encrypted without the permission of the author.


    The technology would work and be presented as exactly the same as iTunes, Xbox Live, NetFlix and similar services. The only difference is that the technology used would be free and open.

    It will be based on PGP keys: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pretty_Good_Privacy

    "To the best of publicly available information, there is no known method which will allow a person or group to break PGP encryption by cryptographic or computational means."


    I'm targetting public broadcasters at first. Most content produced by CBC and the BBC is funded by tax payers, so it will likely be free if you live in their broadcasting areas.

    It would be trivial as well to add a system where you have to pay a "license fee" to get access to the content outside of its original broadcasting area.

    darkphoenix22 on
  • darkphoenix22darkphoenix22 Registered User
    edited June 2010
    I'm considering organizing an old fashioned protest later this month in Queen's Park.

    With the following message:

    "09 F9 11 02 9D 74 E3 5B D8 41 56 C5 63 56 88 C0

    All digital locks should be free and open technology. The people should hold the keys to our media."

    darkphoenix22 on
  • FremFrem Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Frem wrote: »
    "Trying to make digital files uncopyable is like trying to make water not wet."
    -- Bruce Schneier

    My goal isn't to discourage *reproduction*. It's to discourage *republication*, which is a MUCH easier task.

    I'm advocating strict fines for publishing a key or content that is known to have been encrypted without the permission of the author.

    That's great. It makes the technical side of republication even easier, just with stricter legal punishments.

    Additionally the law this is in response to in general seems like it could have a negative impact on fair-use/dealing type stuff, regardless of how open the DRM system was.

    Frem on
  • AridholAridhol Daddliest Catch Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Just installed Ubuntu 10.4 in less than 10 minutes on my old machine :)
    I had been running vista for the last year and it eventually became so slow it took minutes to open programs

    core 2 duo 1.6ghz, 2gb ram, 8800gts.
    I had scanned it with malware bytes, f-secure etc.., nothing found. Defragged, msconfig, everything I could think of and I found no reason for slowdown at all, except Vista.

    Now with ubuntu installed it's back to being a snappy usable machine.

    I now come with program recommendations.

    Here is what I have so far:

    Development: Aptana, mysql server, apache.
    Video: VLC (anything else needed?)
    Browser: Chrome
    Work: Open office
    Email: Evolution


    What I need:
    Any iTunes quality media player that can sync with my iphone. Including podcasts/mp3's/video/etc.. (currently using itunes on my gaming machine).

    Image viewer as close to acdsee as possible. e.g. fast and configurable.
    Gui FTP client
    Native sql db client like HeidiSQL (I know phpmyadmin can do this but is slow as hell)
    MSN clone
    Twitter app (used tweetdeck but something more nimble would be nice)

    Themes! Never had luck with themes. I'm looking for complete overhauls, not just window borders and buttons.


    Also any other cool apps people are using :)

    Aridhol on
  • darkphoenix22darkphoenix22 Registered User
    edited June 2010
    Frem wrote: »
    That's great. It makes the technical side of republication even easier, just with stricter legal punishments.

    Additionally the law this is in response to in general seems like it could have a negative impact on fair-use/dealing type stuff, regardless of how open the DRM system was.

    Well it's primary purpose is for legal, protected content transfered over P2P.

    darkphoenix22 on
  • SeeksSeeks Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Alright folks, just added a small games section to the OP.

    Anyone have some suggestions for games I should add? Commercial, open-source, whatever... as long as it's a good game. None of that Tuxracer bullshit.

    Seeks on
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  • darkphoenix22darkphoenix22 Registered User
    edited June 2010
    Frets on Fire: Guitar Hero clone
    LinCity-NG: SimCity clone
    Frozen Bubble: Puzzle Bobble clone
    Neverball: Monkey Ball clone
    Secret Maryo Chronicles: Awesome Mario clone
    StepMania: DDR clone
    Wormux: Worms clone
    FreeCiv: Civilization clone

    darkphoenix22 on
  • darkphoenix22darkphoenix22 Registered User
    edited June 2010
    Aridhol wrote: »
    Also any other cool apps people are using :)

    Video: SMPlayer
    Music: Banshee (No player supports iPhone on Linux. Sorry :( )
    FTP: FileZilla
    MSN: emesene or Empathy
    MySQL GUI: MySQL Administrator
    Twitter: Pino

    darkphoenix22 on
  • FremFrem Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Aquaria: Indie Metroidvania. (Commercial)
    Unreal Tournament 2004: Best arena FPS of all time. (Commercial)
    Quake Wars: Best Battlefield clone. (Commercial)
    Dungeon Crawl: Stone Soup is a great roguelike. It has a really nice graphical tiled version, too. Getting it compiled can be a pain, though. You may want to reference the Arch Linux PKGBUILD.

    As far as random apps go, Gnome Do is one of the better QuickSilver clones we have. Tends to die after my laptop comes out of hibernation, though. Kupfer is similar but way more stable, way less pretty, and has a tendency to switch between programs instead of launch new instances of them.

    I can vouch for Pino's superiority. It even uses the Ubuntu messaging menu properly.

    Shotwell is a decent lightweight photo management program. There have been rumors that it's going to replace F-spot in future Ubuntu releases at some point.

    Frem on
  • darkphoenix22darkphoenix22 Registered User
    edited June 2010
    Frem wrote: »
    Shotwell is a decent lightweight photo management program. There have been rumors that it's going to replace F-spot in future Ubuntu releases at some point.

    Given what I've read on the mailing lists, it's essentially offical now. ;)

    darkphoenix22 on
  • ImpersonatorImpersonator Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    I prefer Kupfer when it comes to launchers. I can basically copy, cut, and paste files from one folder to the other without starting up my file manager. And it's incredibly lightweight. :)

    Wasn't there iPod/iPhone support already? Strange.

    Impersonator on
    Bioptic wrote: »
    Lemmings was pro-Communist propeganda. All are created equal, sorted into specific jobs and roles that they will hold for the rest of their lives by a higher authority, and must sacrifice continuously for the good of the group. Success is measured by meeting quotas and nothing else. Also, nuclear holocaust.
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