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Need a GPS for driving, advice requested.

Liquid HellzLiquid Hellz Registered User regular
edited May 2010 in Help / Advice Forum
I am going to need a GPS for driving around unfamiliar areas on Tuesday all day to multiple homes.

I need a system that has fast loading times. I have used others before that takes a few seconds to respond to your inputs and I can't stand that.

I need a system that costs less than $200.

I need it to have good battery life and hopefully come with a car charger.

Most of all I need to be able to put multiple addresses into the GPS (10+) and have it take me to those addresses in order of the closest one. I don't want to be doing circles around town all day because I am not familiar with the area, wasting time and gas.

What I do for a living:
Home Inspection and Wind Mitigation
http://www.FairWindInspections.com/
Liquid Hellz on

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    mcdermottmcdermott Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    What do you mean by "loading times" and "respond to your inputs?" I ask only because all the modern Garmin units I've used are responsive enough...they'll take a second when searching, but that's largely because they're searching a bigass database of stuff.

    They also will, in general, recalculate directions quite quickly (the only issues I've run into involved long cross-country trips...it then recalculates the whole route...for cross-town they're fine).

    All the Garmin models that I've seen come with a car charger...average battery life is on the order of four hours or so.

    The last can be a bit of a pain. I don't know about others, but on the Garmin side when doing a search it will bring up locations in order of direct distance...so, for instance, when searching for theaters I get hits from Seattle before I get hits from Tacoma (despite the large body of water between me and Seattle). What they can do is, when you hit them, tell you time/distance by road...but the initial list will come up by straight-line distance. You can also have it just bring up "Favorites," which would be the 10+ addresses you punch in (you can also hook up through USB and use Google Maps to send the points to the GPS).

    Do you already have the 10+ addresses you're looking at? It'll be easier to use Google Maps to plan your route, then punch them into the GPS in order. Then just choose the next after you get to each house as your new destination.

    Anyway, what I guess I'm telling you is that there are a ton of GPS units in the sub-$200 range (some below $100), but I don't think any are geared toward your exact needs. Primarily the last...that's just not a normal usage. At which point I'd just grab the cheapest one that does most of what you need, but that's just me.

    I have the Garmin Nuvi 205. It's cheap. It gets the job done. For maybe $10 more, you can get the Nuvi 255, the primary difference being text-to-speech; the former will simply say "Turn left in 100 feet," whereas the latter will say "Turn left on Main Street" (or whatever approximation it can manage). Honestly I'm not sure how much I care about that.

    mcdermott on
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    SzechuanosaurusSzechuanosaurus Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited May 2010
    Planning the most effiicient route around multiple destinations is something you would think would be a common feature. I can imagine a lot of commercial applications for it from courier services to sales people.

    How do courier companies do that? Preplanned routes at the depot downloaded into the vans GPS?

    Szechuanosaurus on
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    SideAffectsSideAffects Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    I have an entry-level GPS, the magellan 1200 Roadmate. I am nearly positive that it can't do what you need a GPS to do, unfortunately.

    For Magellans, the yearly map updates cost about $80. I would definitely check whatever manufacturer you go with to see what the map update system is like.

    SideAffects on
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    Liquid HellzLiquid Hellz Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    My only previous experience was with an older gps system and when I would click zoom in or out it would take a few seconds to reload the picture. It would also take a few seconds to change from 1 screen to the next in the menu. Like a slow laptop that needed more ram/better processor. That just pissed me off. I went with the Magellan Maestro 4700, found it for $170 at hhgregg. It has the feature I was looking for in "Multi-destination Routing - Plan a trip with multiple stops in the order you want or will optimize it for the most efficient route. Easily reorganize, add, or remove destinations." Thanks for your input guys.

    Liquid Hellz on
    What I do for a living:
    Home Inspection and Wind Mitigation
    http://www.FairWindInspections.com/
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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    I have $150 tom tom and it's amazing, as for storing addresses, it does keep a list, not sure it goes up to 10 or organizes it and does all that stuff, I don't think any gps will let you input 10 destinations in order and advise you on how to get there after each stop.

    bowen on
    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    DaenrisDaenris Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    I have the Garmin Nuvi 755T that I bought recently. It's pretty decent, though the touchscreen leaves a bit to be desired in terms of accuracy.

    It has multi-destination routing, though I've never used it for more than like 2 or 3 locations, so I'm not sure how well it would handle 10+.

    The worst thing about it was the included windshield mount, which didn't work too well, so I got their friction mount which works great (if you have just a bit of flatish dash space).

    Daenris on
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    Protein ShakesProtein Shakes __BANNED USERS regular
    edited May 2010
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    DragonPupDragonPup Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    I have a Garmin Nuvi 205 that I got as a gift and it works fine. Sometimes the directions are not always the best route, but 90% they are perfectly fine.

    As an aside, make sure you never leave the GPS visable when you are note in the car of you may get a window smashed. Make sure you wipe off the suction cup mark, too.

    DragonPup on
    "I was there, I was there, the day Horus slew the Emperor." -Cpt Garviel Loken

    Currently painting: Slowly [flickr]
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    admanbadmanb unionize your workplace Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Planning the most effiicient route around multiple destinations is something you would think would be a common feature. I can imagine a lot of commercial applications for it from courier services to sales people.

    How do courier companies do that? Preplanned routes at the depot downloaded into the vans GPS?

    Planning the most efficient route around multiple destinations is as hard (CPU and time-intensive) as cracking encryption keys. That's why it's not a common feature.

    admanb on
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    a5ehrena5ehren AtlantaRegistered User regular
    edited May 2010

    This one is better and cheaper. The TomTom XL 340S is my default recommendation for a GPS - it has TomTom's IQ routes and lane guidance for most major interchanges, which are pretty cool.

    Edit: Just saw the multi-point routing request - for this, I'd get a Garmin 755.

    a5ehren on
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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    The lane guidance is the god damned best thing ever. Just saying.

    bowen on
    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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